MARY KING

Nationality: United States


In 2001, Mary King, professor of peace and conflict studies, became a contributor to the revitalization of the University for Peace, working closely with UPEACE staff to help bolster its path-finding programme, including a new department based on the centrality of gender to the building of peace. She has since served in many capacities, including as an academic adviser to UPEACE's Africa Programme, now based in Addis Ababa.

In 2002, because of her experience working in sub-Saharan Africa while overseeing the U.S. Peace Corps for the administration of President Jimmy Carter, King was asked by UPEACE to serve on a team conducting consultative missions in fifteen countries in Africa. This UPEACE assignment took her to fifty universities in two years, and following upon discussions with African academicians and NGO leaders there, led to the establishment of the university's Africa Programme to meet the needs of classroom instructors working to institutionalize peace and conflict studies on the continent. As an academic adviser, King helped guide the Africa Programme's two dozen initial curriculum development workshops, partnering with key institutions among Africa's 800 universities. As a byproduct of these workshops and heeding the pleas of African faculty for teaching materials, she has edited or written eight publications for the programme. She currently serves as a member of the International Editorial Board for the programme’s Africa Peace and Conflict Journal.

In addition to teaching periodically at UPEACE, King is distinguished scholar with the American University Center for Global Peace, in Washington, D.C. She is also a Rothermere American Institute Fellow at the University of Oxford, in the United Kingdom. King continues to collaborate with President Jimmy Carter as a special adviser, a role she has played since the early 1970s.

King has won three juried prizes. She received a Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Book Award in 1988 for the chronicling of her personal experiences working for four years alongside the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (no relation) in the student wing of the U.S. civil rights movement. In its review of the book, Freedom Song: A Personal Story of the 1960s Civil Rights Movement (New York: William Morrow, 1987), the New York Times calls her one of a "tiny handful" of white, female "heroic, unsung organizers of the Southern civil rights movement." In 2003, she was given the Jamnalal Bajaj International Award, which recognizes the promotion of Gandhian values. The prize is named for the silent financial partner of Mohandas K. Gandhi who paid for his travel and telephone calls. In receiving this prize in Mumbai (Bombay), India, she joined the ranks of such previous winners as Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu of South Africa, Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat of the United Kingdom, and Professor Johan Galtung of Norway. Most recently, she was awarded the 2009 El-Hibri Peace Education Prize "in recognition of her life-long devotion to the field of peace education and her outstanding work toward peace in the Middle East." Fuad and Nancy El-Hibri founded the prize to honor an educator who has brought awareness of and promoted the expansion of the field of peace education.

The list of King's articles and books on nonviolent civil resistance is long and includes Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr: The Power of Nonviolent Action, a 1999 work commissioned by UNESCO examining nine contemporary nonviolent struggles. Its second edition was published in 2002 in New Delhi by Mehta Publishers and the Indian Council for Cultural Relations. A Quiet Revolution: The First Palestinian Intifada and Nonviolent Resistance (New York: Nation Books, 2007; London: Perseus Group, 2008) has received high acclaim.

King's latest work is a reference book, The New York Times and Emerging Democracies in Eastern Europe (Washington, D.C.: TimesReference and CQ Press/Sage, 2009). It concerns the nonviolent revolutions in the late 1980s and early 1990s that brought about democratic transitions in Poland, Hungary, East Germany, and Czechoslovakia in central Europe; the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania; and Serbia, Georgia, and Ukraine in the Balkans and Caucasus. In the book, she adds historical narrative to reports by New York Times correspondents, indentifying the ideas, strategies, and methods that shaped the popular movements of civil resistance in these ten nation-states that at the close of World War II had been occupied by the Soviet army or controlled by totalitarian communist governments.

In 1989, King's alma mater Ohio Wesleyan University bestowed on her its highest honor, the award for distinguished achievement. Her doctorate in international politics is from the University of Wales at Aberystwyth. With support from the United States Institute of Peace, she is completing the manuscript for a book tentatively titled Conversion and the Mechanisms of Change in Nonviolent Action: The 1924-25 Vykom Satyagraha Case. This study, which concerns a nonviolent struggle against untouchability, is based on original research in archives and newspaper morgues in what is modern-day Kerala, India.

Professor King was co-author, with Casey Hayden (Sandra Cason), of "Sex and Caste," a document now viewed as kindling for second-wave feminism. Published by the War Resisters League in 1966, the article has been anthologized countless times. It resulted from discussions among women in the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, at the heart of which King worked for four years. The Americanist historian Ruth Rosen in The World Split Open: How the Women's Movement Changed America asserts that this article makes King a central figure in starting the contemporary women's movement.

Several of Professor King's books, including some UPEACE publications, can be ordered via forms and links posted on her Web site: www.maryking.info.

 

Responsibilities at UPEACE

  • Academic adviser to the Africa Programme, including curriculum development, academic workshops, and planning
  • Teaching participants in the Gender and Peace Studies Department, and
  • Advise the Rector on a variety of issues as requested, including the Academic Advisory Council, research, outreach, and planning.

Education and Qualifications

OHIO WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY, DELAWARE, OHIO, USA

  • B.A. English Literature

UNIVERSITY OF WALES AT ABERYSTWYTH, UK

  • Ph.D. International Politics

Courses/Subjects Taught
History of nonviolent movements, theories and methods of nonviolent struggle, peace and conflict studies, gender studies, history of political ideas, gender and building peace, international politics, and U.S. civil rights movement.

Work Experience
Summary: Political scientist. Practitioner of international relations for twenty-five years, requiring personal contact with heads of state and government ministers in 120 developing countries. Since 1984, special adviser to former President Jimmy Carter on the Middle East. Former senior U.S. official with worldwide responsibility for the Peace Corps, then in 60 countries. Authority on nonviolent political movements─an outgrowth of her work a s a young student alongside the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (no relation) in the U.S. civil rights movement. Prize-winning nonfiction author. Her article, “Sex and Caste,” co-authored with Casey Hayden, appeared in Liberation magazine of the War Resisters League, in April 1966, and was a catalyst in spurring the contemporary U.S. women's movement. The American historian Ruth Rosen in The World Split Open: How the Women's Movement Changed America, calls King a central figure in starting the U.S. women's movement.

  • 2001– Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies, UPEACE.
  • 2004 Senior Fellow, University of Oxford, Rothermere American Institute, England.
  • 1997– Distinguished Scholar, American University Center for Global Peace, Washington, D.C.
  • 1999–2001 Professor of International Politics, St George's University, Grenada, West Indies.
  • 1996–98 Fellow, Albert Einstein Institution, Boston.
  • 1992– President, Global Action, Inc., Washington, D.C., nonprofit research organization
  • 1990–92 Expert consultant, ABC London News Bureau and BBC, London.
  • 1984– Special adviser to former President Jimmy Carter, acting as his personal emissary to political and business leaders in the Middle East of the region.
  • 1977–81 Deputy Director, Action, Washington, D.C. Global responsibility for the Peace Corps (60 countries), VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America), Foster Grandparents, Retired Senior Volunteer Program, other national volunteer-service corps programs. Managed $400 million in appropriations. Senate confirmation.
  • 1977–81 Member, United States delegations to five multilateral UN world conferences:
  • 1968–72 Program Officer (GS-13), U.S. Office of Economic Opportunity, or War on Poverty, Washington, D.C. Personally managed $30 million in federal grants.

Courses/Subjects Taught
History of nonviolent movements, theories and methods of nonviolent struggle, peace and conflict studies, gender studies, history of political ideas, gender and building peace, international politics, and U.S. civil rights movement.

Work Experience
Summary
: Political scientist. Practitioner of international relations for twenty-five years, requiring personal contact with heads of state and government ministers in 120 developing countries. Since 1984, special adviser to former President Jimmy Carter on the Middle East. Former senior U.S. official with worldwide responsibility for the Peace Corps, then in 60 countries. Authority on nonviolent political movements─an outgrowth of her work a s a young student alongside the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (no relation) in the U.S. civil rights movement. Prize-winning nonfiction author. Her article, “Sex and Caste,” co-authored with Casey Hayden, appeared in Liberation magazine of the War Resisters League, in April 1966, and was a catalyst in spurring the contemporary U.S. women's movement. The American historian Ruth Rosen in The World Split Open: How the Women's Movement Changed America, calls King a central figure in starting the U.S. women's movement.

  • 2001– Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies, UPEACE.
  • 2004 Senior Fellow, University of Oxford, Rothermere American Institute, England.
  • 1997– Distinguished Scholar, American University Center for Global Peace, Washington, D.C.
  • 1999–2001 Professor of International Politics, St George's University, Grenada, West Indies.
  • 1996–98 Fellow, Albert Einstein Institution, Boston.
  • 1992– President, Global Action, Inc., Washington, D.C., nonprofit research organization
  • 1990–92 Expert consultant, ABC London News Bureau and BBC, London.
  • 1984– Special adviser to former President Jimmy Carter, acting as his personal emissary to political and business leaders in the Middle East of the region.
  • 1977–81 Deputy Director, Action, Washington, D.C. Global responsibility for the Peace Corps (60 countries), VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America), Foster Grandparents, Retired Senior Volunteer Program, other national volunteer-service corps programs. Managed $400 million in appropriations. Senate confirmation.
  • 1977–81 Member, United States delegations to five multilateral UN world conferences:
  • 1968–72 Program Officer (GS-13), U.S. Office of Economic Opportunity, or War on Poverty, Washington, D.C. Personally managed $30 million in federal grants.

Selected Honors and Awards:

  • 2003 Awarded the Jamnalal Bajaj International Award in Mumbai (Bombay), India.
 
Professor Mary King receiving the Jamnalal Bajaj Foundation International Award for promoting Gandhian values outside India, in Mumbai (Bombay) on Tuesday, 4 November 2003. Previous winners of the International Award include Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu of South Africa, Nobel Peace prize winner Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat of the United Kingdom, and Professor Johan Galtung of Norway. Jamnalal Bajaj was Mahatma Gandhi's silent financial partner, during the Indian independence struggles. The Bajaj Prize consists of a citation, a trophy, and a cash prize. For more information about Mary King CLICK HERE
  • Named for Mahatma Gandhi's silent financial backer, the prize recognizes the promotion of Gandhian values outside India. Previous winners include Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu of South Africa, Nobel Peace Prize winner Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat of the United Kingdom, and Professor Johan Galtung of Norway.
  • 1992 Inducted into the National Women's Hall of Fame, Seneca Falls, New York.
  • 1989 Award for Distinguished Achievement—the highest recognition given by her Alma Mater, Ohio Wesleyan University.
  • 1988 Winner of a Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Book Award for her book, Freedom Song: A Personal Story of the 1960s Civil Rights Movement

Selected Boards and Commissions:

  • 1998– Adviser appointed by the Government of India.
  • 1989–94 Member, International Commission on Peace and Food (successor to the Brandt, Palme, and Brundtland Commissions).
  • 1980– Board of Directors, the Arca Foundation, private philanthropic foundation
  • 1993– Board of Selectors,The Jefferson Awards (American Institute for Public Service).
  • 1989– Board of Directors, Amideast Educational and Testing Service, Washington, DC
  • 1980–91 Board of Directors, Save the Children Community Development Federation.

Books:

  • Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr: The Power of Nonviolent Action. Paris, UNESCO, 1999. 529 pp. Second edition, New Delhi, Indian Council for Cultural Relations and Mehta Publishers, 2002.
  • Freedom Song: A Personal Story of the 1960s Civil Rights Movement. New York, William Morrow, 1987; Quill paperback, 1988. 546 pp. (A 1988 Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Book Award was given to the author for this book.)

Publications ─ Partial List of Articles, Chapters, and Special Lectures

  • Women's Policy Journal of Harvard (Summer 2002: 11-27), ‘Women and the Building of Peace: Muslim-Hindu Women's Resistance to Militarization of Kashmir, and Israeli Women Seeking an End to Military Occupation of Palestinians'.
  • Journal of American History (December 2000: 1127-28), review of Timothy B. Tyson's Radio Free Dixie: Robert F. Williams and the Roots of Black Power.
  • The [First] Palestinian Intifada: A Program of Nonviolent Struggle, chapter in The Middle East, ninth edition (Washington, D.C., Congressional Quarterly Press, 2000).
  • CNN's ‘Cold War' series, appearance, episode 19, Freeze, 28 February 1999; also on BBC.
  • ‘The Power of Nonviolent Action and the Culture of Peace', speech to XI World Congress of Psychiatry, Hamburg, Germany, 6 August 1999.
  • C-Span lecture, ‘Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham City Jail and Its Continuing Impact', C-Span tape no. 88840, 29 August 1997.
  • Los Angeles Times Book Review, 12 November 1989, review of Ralph Abernathy's And the Walls Came Tumbling Down.
  • ‘Nicaragua's Economy Still a Mystery to U.S.' San Jose Mercury News, 25 August 1985.
  • ‘So that the Sacrifices of 1964 Will Not Have Been in Vain', Los Angeles Times, 12 July 1984.
  • ‘Assault on World Hunger Begs for U.S. Attention', Washington Star, 7 April 1981.
  • ‘Peace Corps Health Programming and Health Policy in Developing Countries', American Journal of Public Health (April 1981: 408 B9).
  • ‘People Not Money Can Save Lives', Sunday Times [London], 24 February 1980.
  • ‘Responding to the Refugee Dilemma', Christian Century, 2 July 1980.
  • ‘A Nation Overwhelmed by Refugees', Newsday, 17 September 1980.
  • ________ and Casey Hayden, ‘Sex and Caste', Liberation (War Resisters League), April 1966.
  • Selected Biographical Listings and Memberships:
    Authors' Yearbook
  • Contemporary Authors
  • International Biographical Centre, Cambridge, England
  • From Suffrage to the Senate: An Encyclopedia of American Women, ed. Suzanne O'Dea Schenken (Santa Barbara, California: ABC-Clio, 1999, vol. 1, pp. 379-380).
  • Who's Who in the 21 st Century
  • Who's Who in America
  • Who's Who in American Politics
  • Middle East Studies Association
  • Women in International Security
  • Women's Foreign Policy Group