Academic Course Calendar - All Programmes - 2016 - 2017

Courses and Teachers
2016 - 2017 - All Programmes
Course listings are continously updated with new information
Courses Teacher Credits # Weeks Dates
Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Social Change (Online Course)
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
6 weeks
16 May-26 Jun 2016
Diploma in Social Innovation (Online Course)
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
18 months
16 Jun 16-16 Jun 17
Positive Leadership
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
0 weeks
25-27 Jul 2016
Change Management
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
1 day
28-28 Jul 2016
Designing Your Life: Innovating From the Inside Out (Online Course)
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
4 weeks
1-26 Aug 2016
Curso Introductorio UPAZ
Mandatory
Alonso Muñoz
(Costa Rica)
Jan Breitling
(Germany)
Juan Carlos Sainz-Borgo
(Venezuela)
Laura Arroyo

Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
Mónica Paniagua

Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
22 Aug-09 Sep 2016
8:45am. - 11:45am. At Earth Charter Auditorium
UPEACE Foundation Course
Mandatory
Gal Harmat
(Israel)
Jan Breitling
(Germany)
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
Mayumi Yamada
(Japan)
Mihir Kanade
(India)
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
22 Aug-09 Sep 2016
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Council Room
Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Social Change (Online Course)
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
6 weeks
05 Sep-14 Oct 2016
Social Media for Social Innovation (Online Course)
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
4 weeks
05 Sep-02 Oct 2016
United Nations System
Optional
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
3 credits
9 weeks
12 Sep-11 Nov 2016
Peace and Conflict Studies; The Foundation Course
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
Virginia Cawagas
(Philippines/Canada)
3 credits
9 weeks
12 Sep-11 Nov 2016
Environment, Conflicts, and Sustainability
Mandatory
Jan Breitling
(Germany)
3 credits
3 weeks
14 Sep-05 Oct 2016
8:45AM - 11:45 AM At Council Room
Foundation Course on Public International Law
Mandatory
Mihir Kanade
(India)
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
3 credits
3 weeks
14 Sep-05 Oct 2016
8:45 - 11:45 At Classroom #3
Gender Theories and Practices
Mandatory
Ellyn Kaschak
(United States)
3 credits
3 weeks (NOTE: 15 September - National Day)
14 Sep-05 Oct 2016
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #1
Introduction to International Peace Studies, from War to Peace
Mandatory
Jerry Sanders
(United States)
3 credits
3 weeks (NOTE: 15 September-National Day)
14 Sep-05 Oct 2016
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #2
Peace Education: Theory and Practice
Mandatory
David Ragland
(United States)
3 credits
3 weeks (NOTE: 15 September - National Day)
14 Sep-05 Oct 2016
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #4
Métodos de Negociación, Investigación y Monitoreo
Mandatory
Francisco Rojas
(Chile)
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
19 Sep-05 Oct 2016
8:45am. - 11:45am. At Classroom #5
Skills for Effective Negotiations (Online Course)
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
4 weeks
26 Sep-21 Oct 2016
Introducción al Estudio del Sistema de ONU
Mandatory
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
3 credits
3 weeks
10-28 Oct 2016
1:15pm. - 4:15pm. At Council Room
The United Nations System and UPMUNC (Part I)
Mandatory
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
2 credits
2 weeks (NOTE: including one double session -day TBA- 8:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. - Notice that 17 October - National Day)
10-21 Oct 2016
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Mission Impossible? Measuring Outcomes and Impact (Online Course)
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
4 weeks
17 Oct-11 Nov 2016
Water, Security and Peace
Recommended
Julie Ann Elkins Watson
(USA)
3 credits
3 weeks
26 Oct-15 Nov 2016
8:45 - 11:45 At Council Room
Gender in Peace Building and Human Security
Mandatory
Gal Harmat
(Israel)
3 credits
3 weeks
26 Oct-15 Nov 2016
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #1
Security Sector Reform
Mandatory
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
3 credits
3 weeks
26 Oct-15 Nov 2016
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #5
Media: Theories and Practices
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
26 Oct-15 Nov 2016
1:15 p.m. - 04:15 p.m. At Classroom #3
Forests, Forestry and Poverty
Recommended
Jan Breitling
(Germany)
3 credits
3 weeks
26 Oct-15 Nov 2016
1:15 - 4:15 At Classroom #4
Economic Development, Peace and Conflict
Mandatory
Jan Pronk
(Netherlands)
3 credits
3 weeks
26 Oct-15 Nov 2016
8:45 - 11:45 At Classroom #2
The Political Economy of International Development and Peace
Mandatory
Jan Pronk
(Netherlands)
3 credits
3 weeks
26 Oct-15 Nov 2016
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #4
Protection of Internally Displaced Persons
Optional
Jan Arno Hessbruegge
(Germany)
2 credits
2 weeks
26 Oct-06 Dec 2016
Foundation Course on Human Rights Law
Mandatory
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
3 credits
3 weeks
31 Oct-15 Nov 2016
1:15 - 4:15 At Council Room
Regenerative Leadership
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
4 weeks
2-30 Nov 2016
Gender, Development and Human Rights
Optional
Gal Harmat
(Israel)
2 credits
6 weeks
02 Nov-13 Dec 2016
Fundamentos de Estudio de Paz y Conflicto
Mandatory
Manuela Mesa
(Española)
3 credits
3 weeks
3-23 Nov 2016
1:15pm - 4:15pm At Classroom #1
Disarmament: Towards Maintenance of International Peace and Security
Mandatory
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
2 credits
6 weeks
07 Nov-16 Dec 2016
Workshop on Negotiation and Mediation Skills
Optional
Amr Abdalla
(Egypt)
Lilya Hazal Akay
(Germany)
2 credits
6 weeks
07 Nov-16 Dec 2016
Peace and Sports
Optional
Gal Harmat
(Israel)
Gal Peleg Laniado
(Israel)
2 credits
6 weeks
07 Nov-16 Dec 2016
Fundraising for Sustainable Development
Optional
Juergen Carls
(Germany)
2 credits
6 weeks
07 Nov-16 Dec 2016
Management of Coastal Resources
Recommended
Marco Quesada
(Costa Rica)
3 credits
3 weeks (NOTE: including double session on Dec 02
17 Nov-02 Dec 2016
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #4
Sustainable Agriculture
Recommended
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
21 Nov-09 Dec 2016
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #2
International Law Related to Armed Conflict
Mandatory
Héctor Olasolo Alonso
(Spain)
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
3 credits
3 weeks
21 Nov-02 Dec 2016
8:45am - 4:15pm At Classroom #3
Research Methodology
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
21 Nov-09 Dec 2016
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Review of Economic Theories and Concepts
Mandatory
Alonso Muñoz
(Costa Rica)
3 credits
3 weeks
21 Nov-09 Dec 2016
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #5
Global Law and Human Rights
Optional
Valentina Volpe
(Italy)
1 credits
1 weeks
28 Nov-02 Dec 2016
1:15pm - 4:15pm. At Classroom #1
Fundamentos de Derecho Internacional de los Derechos Humanos
Mandatory
Manuel Enrique Ventura Robles
(Costarricense)
3 credits
3 weeks
28 Nov-09 Dec 2016
8:45am - 11:45am At Other
Transitional Justice and International Criminal Law Part I
Mandatory
Cynthia Chamberlain
(Costarrican)
1 credits
1 weeks
5-9 Dec 2016
8:45am - 11:45am At Classroom #3
Hybrid Diploma in Social Innovation
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
18 months
5-7 Dec 2016
Positive Leadership
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
0 weeks
5-7 Dec 2016
Disaster Risk Reduction
Recommended
Urbano Fra
(Spain)
3 credits
3 weeks
9-27 Jan 2017
8:45 - 11:45 At Classroom #2
Climate Change Governnce
Recommended
Yolanda Ariadne Collins
(Guyana)
3 credits
3 weeks
9-27 Jan 2017
8:45 - 11:45 At Classroom #3
Research Methodology
Mandatory
Amr Abdalla
(Egypt)
3 credits
9 weeks
09 Jan-10 Mar 2017
Gender Mainstreaming in Peacekeeping Operations and in Humanitarian Assistance
Mandatory
Mayumi Yamada
(Japan)
3 credits
3 weeks
9-27 Jan 2017
1:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. At Classroom #1
Ethical Media Production and Peace Journalism
Mandatory
Saumava Mitra
(India)
3 credits
3 weeks
9-27 Jan 2017
1:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. At Classroom #4
Intercultural Education: Paradigms and Practices
Mandatory
María Celina Del Felice
(Argentina)
3 credits
3 weeks
9-27 Jan 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #5
Fundamentos de Ambiente y Desarrollo
Mandatory
Alonso Muñoz
(Costa Rica)
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
9-27 Jan 2017
8:45am. - 11:45am. At Classroom #4
The Kurds between Past and Present Genocides in Iraq: Fresh Hopes or New Tragedies?
Optional
María Rita Corticelli

Mohammed Ihsan

3 credits
3 weeks
9-13 Jan 2017
8:45am - 11:45am. At Classroom #1
Derechos Humanos e Internet
Optional
Mariateresa Garrido Villareal
(Venezuela)
1 credits
1 weeks
11-26 Jan 2017
1:15pm. - 4:15pm. At Classroom #2
Transitional Justice and International Criminal Law
Mandatory
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
2 credits
2 weeks
16-27 Jan 2017
1:15 - 4:15 At Council Room
Sustainable Development Goals
Optional
Mihir Kanade
(India)
2 credits
6 weeks
16 Jan-24 Feb 2017
Human Vulnerability and Climate Change Adaptation
Optional
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
2 credits
6 weeks
16 Jan-24 Feb 2017
Nonviolent Transformation of Conflicts
Optional
Mary E. King
(United States)
2 credits
6 weeks
16 Jan-24 Feb 2017
Indigenous Peoples’ Rights and Development
Optional
Mihir Kanade
(India)
2 credits
6 weeks
18 Jan-28 Feb 2017
Protection of Human Rights in the Contemporary World: Practices, Challenges and Prospects
Optional
Mihir Kanade
(India)
3 credits
9 weeks
18 Jan-21 Mar 2017
Human Rights, Dignity and Peace: Reconceptualizing the World Citizenship through the Work of Hannah Arendt
Optional
Jana Lozanoska
(Yugoslavia)
1 credits
1 weeks
23-27 Jan 2017
8:45am - 11:45am At Classroom #1
Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Social Change (Online Course)
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
0 weeks
25 Jan-07 Mar 2017
Designing Your Life: Innovating From the Inside Out (Online Course)
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
4 weeks
30 Jan-26 Feb 2017
Human Rights Education
Mandatory
Gal Harmat
(Israel)
3 credits
3 weeks (NOTE: including some double sessions on Feb 2, 6, 7, 8 and 9 - 8:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.)
30 Jan-10 Feb 2017
1:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. At Classroom #4
Research Methods
Mandatory
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
31 Jan-17 Feb 2017
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Council Room
Universal & Regional Mechanisms for Human Rights Protection
Mandatory
Frans Jacobus Viljoen
(South African)
Jorge Francisco Calderón Gamboa
(Mexican)
Julie Diane Recinos
(USA)
María Pía Carazo Ortiz
(Costa Rica)
3 credits
3 weeks
31 Jan-17 Feb 2017
1:15 - 4:15 At Classroom #1
International and Transnational Adjudication
Mandatory
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
3 credits
3 weeks
31 Jan-17 Feb 2017
8:45 - 11:45 At Classroom #6
Gender, Environment and Sustainable Development
Mandatory
Cordula Reimann
(Germany/Switzerland)
3 credits
3 weeks (NOTE: including one double session - day TBA - 8:45 a.m. - 4:15 p.m.)
31 Jan-17 Feb 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #3
Strategic Nonviolence Resistance
Mandatory
Maciej Bartkowski
(Poland/United States)
3 credits
3 weeks (NOTE: including three double sessions -on Thursday 2, 9 and 16 Feb- 8:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.)
31 Jan-17 Feb 2017
1:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. At Classroom #5
Seminario: Conceptos de Seguridad y Desarme en el entorno Internacional y Desarme
Mandatory
Ana Teresa Dengo Benavides
(Costa Rica)
José Antonio Sanahuja Perales
(Español)
3 credits
3 weeks
31 Jan-17 Feb 2017
8:45am. - 11:45am. At Classroom #1
Freedom of Expression in the Digital Age
Optional
Mariateresa Garrido Villareal
(Venezuela)
1 credits
1 weeks
1-16 Feb 2017
1:15pm - 4:15pm. At Classroom #2
Social Media for Social Innovation (Online Course)
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
4 weeks
13 Feb-12 Mar 2017
Género, Conflicto y Paz
Mandatory
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
3 credits
3 weeks
22 Feb-14 Mar 2017
1:15pm. - 4:15pm. At Council Room
Tools for Conflict Resolution and Transformation
Mandatory
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
22 Feb-14 Mar 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Monitoreo: Rol de la Sociedad Civil en temas de Derechos Humanos (1 crédito)
Mandatory
Marcia Aguiluz
(Costa Rica)
1 credits
1 weeks
1-3 Mar 2017
8:45am - 11:45am At Classroom #2
Global Governance
Optional
Mihir Kanade
(India)
2 credits
6 weeks
06 Mar-14 Apr 2017
Transitional Justice
Optional
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
2 credits
6 weeks
06 Mar-14 Apr 2017
International Law, Borders and Conflicts
Optional
Juan Carlos Sainz-Borgo
(Venezuela)
2 credits
6 weeks
06 Mar-14 Apr 2017
Security Sector Reform
Optional
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
2 credits
6 weeks
06 Mar-14 Apr 2017
Introduction to Responsible Management
Mandatory
Andre Nijhof
(Netherlands)
3 credits
3 weeks
20 Mar-07 Apr 2017
8:45 - 11:45 At Classroom #1
Food Security
Recommended
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
20 Mar-07 Apr 2017
1:15 - 4:15 At Classroom #5
International Refugee Law
Mandatory
Ana Belen Anguita

Luis Diego Obando

Marco Formesano

Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, Costa Rica

Pablo Rodriguez
(Costa Rica)
1 credits
1 week
20-24 Mar 2017
1:15pm - 4:15pm At Classroom #3
Disarmament Education
Mandatory
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
2 credits
2 weeks
20-31 Mar 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Gender and Media
Mandatory
Heather Kertyzia
(Canada)
2 credits
2 weeks
20-31 Mar 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #2
Operaciones de Mantenimiento de Paz
Mandatory
General Alberto Teófilo Asarta Cuevas
(Español)
Juan Carlos Sainz-Borgo
(Venezuela)
3 credits
3 weeks
20 Mar-07 Apr 2017
8:45am. - 11:45am. At Classroom #3
International Law and the International Labour Organization
Mandatory
Ana Catalina Ramirez

Francesco Carella

ILO Team -

Noortje Denker

Tania Caron

1 credits
1 weeks
27-31 Mar 2017
1:15PM - 4:15PM At Classroom #3
Working in Conflict and Post-Conflict Areas - Field Training
Mandatory
Alvaro Sierra
(Colombia)
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
2 credits
1 week
3-7 Apr 2017
8:45 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. At Council Room
Gender and Peacebuilding
Mandatory
Gal Harmat
(Israel)
3 credits
9 weeks
10 Apr-09 Jun 2017
Terrorism and Transnational Organized Crime
Optional
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
3 credits
9 weeks
10 Apr-09 Jun 2017
Religion/Faith, Conflict and Peacebuilding
Optional
Toh Swee-Hin (S. H. Toh)
(Australia/Canada)
2 credits
6 weeks
17 Apr-26 May 2017
Seminario Taller: Temas de la Agenda Internacional
Mandatory
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
1 credits
1 weeks
17 Apr-05 May 2017
1:15pm. - 4:15pm. At Classroom #2
The United Nations System and UPMUNC (Part II)
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
1 credits
3 days
19-21 Apr 2017
8:45 a.m. - 4:15 p.m. At Council Room
International Economic Law
Mandatory
Mihir Kanade
(India)
3 credits
3 weeks
24 Apr-12 May 2017
1:15 - 4:15 At Classroom #1
Human Rights Reporting, Monitoring, and Evaluation
Mandatory
Jan Arno Hessbruegge
(Germany)
3 credits
3 weeks
24 Apr-12 May 2017
8:45 - 11:45 At Classroom #1
Gender and people on the move: Trafficking, Refugees, Asylum Seekers and Migration
Mandatory
Adriana Salcedo
(United States)
3 credits
3 weeks (NOTE: including one double session - day TBA - 8:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. - Notice that May 1 - National Day)
24 Apr-12 May 2017
1:15 p.m. - 4:15 p.m. At Classroom #4
Transnational Organized Crime
Mandatory
Philip Reichel
(United States)
3 credits
3 weeks (NOTE: including one double session - day TBA - 8:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. - Notice that May 1 - National Day)
24 Apr-12 May 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Natural Resource Management Field Course
Recommended
Jan Breitling
(Germany)
3 credits
3 weeks
24 Apr-12 May 2017
1:15 PM - 4:15 PM At Classroom #5
Education for Sustainability
Mandatory
Mirian Vilela
(Brazil)
3 credits
3 weeks (NOTE: including one double session -day TBA- 8:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.) Notice that May 1 - National Day
24 Apr-12 May 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #3
Social Responsibility
Mandatory
Nika Salvetti
(Italy)
3 credits
3 weeks
24 Apr-12 May 2017
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #2
Mission Impossible? Measuring Outcomes and Impact (Online Course)
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
4 weeks
1-28 May 2017
Seminario de Investigación
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
15-31 May 2017
8:45am. - 11:45am. At Classroom #4
Religion and Violent Extremism: The Case of Terrorism in the Name of Islam
Optional
Amr Abdalla
(Egypt)
1 credits
1 week
15-19 May 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Human Vulnerability and Climate Change Adaptation
Recommended
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
17 May-06 Jun 2017
1:15 - 4:15 At Council Room
Globalization and Human Rights
Mandatory
Mihir Kanade
(India)
3 credits
3 weeks
17 May-06 Jun 2017
1:15 - 4:15 At Classroom #2
Maritime & Territorial Dispute Settlement
Mandatory
Gudmundur Eiriksson
(Iceland)
Juan Carlos Sainz-Borgo
(Venezuela)
3 credits
3 weeks
17 May-06 Jun 2017
8:45 - 11:45 At Classroom #3
Identity Politics, Inclusion and Peace Building
Mandatory
Arlinda Rrustemi
(Netherlands)
3 credits
3 weeks
17 May-06 Jun 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #1
Education in Emergencies: Armed Conflicts, Disasters and Health Crises
Mandatory
Kees Wiebering
(Netherlands)
3 credits
3 weeks
17 May-06 Jun 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #5
Social Enterpreneurship with Field Experience
Mandatory
Alonso Muñoz
(Costa Rica)
3 credits
3 weeks
17 May-06 Jun 2017
8:45 - 11:45 At Classroom #2
Terrorism and Conflict: Issues and Perspectives
Mandatory
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
2 credits
2 weeks
22 May-02 Jun 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Educating in Changing Times: Reflect, Rethink, Rebuild (Online Course)
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
4 weeks
29 May-25 Jun 2017
Hybrid Diploma in Social Innovation
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
18 months
5-7 Jun 2017
Positive Leadership
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
0 weeks
5-7 Jun 2017
World Politics
Mandatory
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
3 credits
9 weeks
12 Jun-11 Aug 2017
Graduation Project: ISP-Thesis (8 credits) or Internship (8 credits) or Capstone (5 credits).
Mandatory
UPEACE Resident Faculty

8 credits
8 weeks
12 Jun-31 Dec 2017
International Law Dimensions of Peace and Conflicts
Optional
Mihir Kanade
(India)
3 credits
9 weeks
12 Jun-11 Aug 2017
Graduation Project: Thesis (8 credits) or Internship (8 credits) or Capstone (5 credits)
Mandatory
UPEACE Resident Faculty

8 credits
-
12 Jun-31 Dec 2017
Graduation Project: Thesis (8 credits) or Internship (8 credits) or Capstone (5 credits)
Mandatory
UPEACE Resident Faculty

8 credits
-
12 Jun-31 Dec 2017
Graduation Project: Thesis (8 credits) or Internship (8 credits) or Capstone (5 credits)
Mandatory
UPEACE Resident Faculty

8 credits
-
12 Jun-31 Dec 2017
Graduation Project: Thesis (8 credits) or Internship (8 credits) or Capstone (5 credits)
Mandatory
UPEACE Resident Faculty

8 credits
-
12 Jun-31 Dec 2017
Trabajo de Graduación - Tesis -
Mandatory
Facultad Residente UPAZ

8 credits
8 weeks
12 Jun-31 Jul 2017
Trabajo de Graduación - Pasantía -
Mandatory
Facultad Residente UPAZ

8 credits
8 weeks
12 Jun-31 Jul 2017
Media, Peace, and Conflict
Optional
Daniela Ingruber
(Austria)
2 credits
6 weeks
19 Jun-28 Jul 2017
Human Security
Optional
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
2 credits
6 weeks
19 Jun-28 Jul 2017
Implementing Projects and Local Capacity Building
Optional
Gal Harmat
(Israel)
2 credits
6 weeks
07 Aug-15 Sep 2017
Conflict Analysis
Optional
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
3 credits
9 weeks
07 Aug-06 Oct 2017
Globalization and Human Rights
Optional
Mihir Kanade
(India)
2 credits
2 weeks
07 Aug-15 Sep 2017
Environment, Development and Peace
Optional
Jan Breitling
(Germany)
2 credits
6 weeks
07 Aug-15 Sep 2017
Leading Strategies for Change
Optional
Rolain Borel
(Switzerland)
2 credits
6 weeks
18 Sep-27 Oct 2017
Independent Research Project
Mandatory
TBD .

6 credits
1
20-20 Dec 2017



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COURSE DESCRIPTION

The Diploma in Social Innovation is awarded upon completing 5 of the UPEACE Centre’s courses within a period of 18 months.  The ‘Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Social Change’ is the only required course. Aside from that course, you may choose 4 more from the following options:

  • Skills for Effective Negotiations
  • Designing Your Life: Innovating From the Inside Out
  • Educating in Changing Times: Reflect, Rethink, Rebuild
  • Mission Impossible: Measuring Outcomes & Impact
  • Social Media for Social Innovation
  • Regenerative Leadership

These courses are offered several times during the year, so make sure to check our list of courses and their upcoming dates.  In order to enroll in these courses, just send us your choice of courses, so we can reserve your space. 

You may choose to complete your payment in one of the following ways:

  • Pay for each course as you enroll and the last 4-week online course will be free.
  • Pay for the Diploma at the beginning and receive a special price of $1,950 for the 5 courses in the Diploma (instead of $2,730).  If you choose this option, please follow the instructions below.

This course will cover the following themes:

  • Integral Leadership
  • Appreciative Inquiry
  • Self-Evaluation and energy audit
  • Conflict Style and Resolution
  • Practicing Innovative Thinking
  • Getting Things Done

By the end of this course, you will:

  • Identify and understand the purpose of change and its impact on you and others
  • Explore a user friendly model to understand our personal reaction to change and define what is required, personally and as a leader, to become change ready. Creating and cultivating a change ready mindset.
  • Engage in and experience practical techniques to identify strategies to effectively integrate and execute against new and/or shifting organizational priorities.
  • Identify and demonstrate the personal leadership skills that are necessary to work with confidence through change and coach others
  • Develop a personal action plan for continued personal and professional development.

El Curso Introductorio de Formación de la Universidad para la Paz ofrece una introducción crítica y concisa enfocada en el amplio campo de los "Estudios sobre la Paz, la Resolución de Conflictos y el Desarrollo", dirigida a todos los estudiantes de esta Maestría, la misma que ha sido aprobada en su creación según  Resolución del Consejo de la Universidad para la Paz - órgano de gobierno de la Universidad- adoptada durante su Vigésima Sexta Sesión Extraordinaria, los días  21 y 22 de Octubre del año 2015, en la sede de las Naciones Unidas, Nueva York.

Siguiendo el mandato de la Carta de Fundación de las Naciones Unidas, así como de la Carta de la Universidad para la Paz, el Curso Introductorio de Formación constituyeuna introducción a los estudios de paz, la resolución de conflictos y el desarrollo, en un contexto global, inclusivo y contemporáneo. Los estudiantes accederán a una visión universal sobre las cuestiones fundamentales, perspectivas y paradigmas para la comprensión de las causas fundamentales de la violencia, los conflictos y su resolución, y las estrategias constructivas para hacer frente a ellos y poder construir la paz en contextos contemporáneos tanto globales, como regionales, nacionales y locales.

El Curso abordará también principios básicos sobre el derecho internacional, el acceso a la justicia, el desarrollo económico y social equilibrado, la globalización, la seguridad humana, la militarización, el desarme y control de armamentos, la sostenibilidad del medio ambiente, el impacto de la pobreza, la desigualdad, el racismo, la xenofobia, y los prejuicios y estereotipos culturales negativos existentes en la sociedad actual.

The UPEACE Foundation Course provides a critical and concise introduction to the broad field of “Peace Studies” for students in all UPEACE programs. It initially addresses key conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of the origins and development of peace studies as an interdisciplinary area within the fields of international relations and political economy, as well as a basic understanding of conflict analysis. Based on a critical analysis of policies, strategies, policies, institutions, organizations and movements, the course then examines a range of core issues, dimensions, perspectives and paradigms for understanding the root causes of conflicts and violence and constructive strategies to address them and build peace in contemporary global, international, regional, national and local contexts, including: conflict management, conflict resolution and conflict transformation; alternative discourse analysis; militarization and disarmament; human rights violations and promotion; gender inequalities, gender-based violence and gender mainstreaming; structural violence, human security, development and globalization; environmental sustainability; corporate social responsibility; cultural and religious identities; media’s role in conflict and peacebuilding; strategies of nonviolence; and peace education. This Foundations course will be essential in catalyzing the awareness, understanding and motivation of UPEACE students from diverse academic programmes to relate, ground or intersect their specific areas of academic and practitioner interest with core theoretical, conceptual and analytical ideas in peace studies.

This course will cover the following topics:

  • Emotional Intelligence Explored/Defined
  • Where does EQ “show up” in the virtual world? Defining the virtual space and our communicative experiences
  • Emerging tools and strategies for developing a voice, support, and funding for your organization online
  • Strategies for organizational leadership using online tools
  • How the new information technology shift impacts our organization, its mission and message

Ever since its establishment in 1945, the United Nations has played a pivotal role in a great variety of affairs, large or small, international and national. As such, the UN has played an incisive role in the lives of people around the world. Much of what the UN does is taken for granted and even goes unnoticed by the larger public, even as an oft quoted saying argues that ‘if the UN did not exist it would have to be invented’. At the same time, millions around the world look to the UN expecting it to address many of the enormous challenges faced by humankind. These complex dynamics are complemented by the fact that the UN is both reliant on what the member states want, while at the same time, being much more than the sum of its members. This course provides a comprehensive and rigorous introduction into the UN system, including its origins and history, its organizational framework and the functioning of various organs, agencies, bodies and programmes. 

The UPEACE Foundation Course provides a critical and concise introduction to the broad field of “Peace Studies” for students in ALL UPEACE programmes. It initially addresses key conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of the origins and development of peace studies as an interdisciplinary area within the fields of international relations and political economy. Based on a critical analysis of policies, strategies, institutions, organizations and movements, the course then examines a range of core issues, dimensions, perspectives and paradigms for understanding the root causes of conflicts and violence and constructive strategies to address them and build peace in contemporary global, international, regional, national and local contexts. The core concepts include militarization, disarmament and arms control; human rights violations and promotion; gender inequalities, gender-based violence and gender mainstreaming; structural violence, human security, development and globalization; environmental sustainability; corporate social responsibility; international law in conflict and peacebuilding; cultural and religious identities; media’s role in conflict and peacebuilding; strategies of nonviolence; and peace education. This Foundations course will be essential in catalyzing the awareness, understanding and motivation of UPEACE students in diverse academic programmes to relate, ground and intersect their specific areas of academic and practitioner interest with core theoretical, conceptual and analytical ideas in peace studies.

This course will take a close look at the linkages between the environment and peace and conflict. First we will introduce the theme of global environmental change and its impacts on human security, development and life in general. We will discuss the different root causes of these environmental and social or development crises as they come forward in the literature, focusing on overpopulation, industrial development, and free market capitalism and globalization. Part of this discussion will be an analysis of the responses to this crisis and what can, should and is being done to stop it.

A second theme we will discuss is the way sustainability is defined and measured, analyzing different aspects of the political characteristics of measuring, and of the complexities around coming up and using indicators to measure something as complex as sustainability. We will analyze the often proposed focus based on the faith on technological efficiency, and demonstrate that technology by itself won’t solve the sustainability problem with regards to the environmental and social dimensions.

A third main theme of this course is to look at the different linkages between environment and violent conflicts. We will discuss the literature on environmental security, going from older frameworks of scarcity induced conflicts to more complex notions of natural resource abundance, globalization, and historical, political, ecological and economic issues that influence peace and conflicts. The topic of environmental peacebuilding will be presented and critically analyzed. We will make use of specific case studies that give insights into the often contradictory roles of the environment and natural resources when analyzing peace and conflicts.

Contemporary international life has become unthinkable without the existence of public international law. Increasingly, international relations have become juridified, while more and more actors (international organizations, individuals, groups, NGOs, and corporations) participate in norm creation, implementation and enforcement. And, as humanity faces unprecedented challenges, the call for more cooperation and regulation is undiminished. This course offers a general overview of the topic of public international law. It provides students with a broad introduction that will focus on laying a firm foundation of knowledge about the most important doctrines and topics in this field. It will provide students with a solid grasp of the vocabulary of international law (sources, jurisdiction, responsibility, enforcement, etc.), as well as a sense of the context in which international law originates and operates and an understanding of the legal and political institutions that play a role in international law. Finally, the course will give a bird’s-eye view of a broad range of issues that are dealt with using international legal tools, such as peace and security, the use of force, human rights, international criminal law, international environmental law, and international economic law.

This course intends to familiarize students with diverse gender theories and systems of domination and oppression. The course explores the central tenets and critiques of the main debates in feminism. The course will introduce the students to various conceptual and theoretical frameworks within feminism, honoring women’s agency and active participation. The course will stimulate critical thinking while providing an understanding of the processes involved in gender discrimination and oppression. Students will explore different frameworks for analyzing the differential impacts of power imbalances. This course will allow students to become familiarized with the central theories and frameworks within feminism and understand some of the core mechanisms that instill and perpetuate oppression. The course will cover the intersection of oppressed identities such as race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, among others; and it will explore some of the mechanisms that create and perpetuate social inequality, such as privilege, structural oppression, gender stereotyping, socialization, discrimination, stigma and microaggression. The course will explore gender imbalance beyond victimhood to discuss women’s agency, as well as the role of feminism in creating social change.

This course will present a comprehensive and critical overview of key conceptual and theoretical ideas, themes and alternative paradigms in International Peace Studies, including a conceptual grounding in the interrelated fields of international relations/security, conflict analysis, resolution and transformation, militarization and disarmament, and the related roles of international organizations.  The core themes and concepts outlined above will be introduced through a historical and comparative analysis of traditional and critical approaches to international peace and security encompassing the dominance of hegemonic peace following the second world war; the ascendance of liberal peace at the end of the cold war; and the emergence of cosmopolitan peace at the turn of the 21st century. Students will examine the work of  several theorists and analysts in various disciplines and interdisciplinary fields including political science, international relations and political economy to understand how each of these orientations has added a new revisionist understanding of peace and security, reinterpreting old orthodoxies to meet the demands of changing circumstances and new challenges.

The course explores a range of conceptual/analytical perspectives for a holistic and critical understanding of the theory and practice of peace education and encourages participants to reflect on the possibilities of educating for peace in a world of complex and escalating conflicts and violence. The multiple strands and dimensions of peace education such as disarmament education, development education, environment education, human rights education, global education, futures education, etc. will be clarified in both historical and contemporary contexts. The course offers a brief description of the UNESCO Culture of Peace, various perspectives of peace education including Indigenous, Islamic, African, Asian experiences; an introduction to a holistic framework of peace education identifying six inter-related dimensions and themes of issues underpinning violence and conflicts namely: educating for (i) dismantling a culture of war, (ii) living with justice and compassion, (iii) promoting human rights and responsibilities, (iv) building cultural respect, reconciliation and solidarity, (v)  living in harmony with the earth, and (vi) cultivating inner peace. Throughout the course, participants will experience peaceful pedagogy based on the principles of holism, dialogue, values formation and critical empowerment.

En la primera parte de este curso, haremos un examen crítico de la metodología de investigación, métodos de negociación y métodos de monitoreo. Primero vamos a explorar la estructura básica de un programa de investigación y examinar los orígenes teóricos y filosóficos de diferentes enfoques de investigación. Vamos a guiar a los estudiantes a medida que aprenden a vincular diferentes métodos de recopilación de información a un enfoque de investigación dado. Para asegurar que los estudiantes adquieren experiencia práctica, complementaremos charlas con talleres prácticos. 

En la segunda parte, se enfocará en el desarrollo de un Taller sobre Teoría y Práctica de Negociación. Este se desarrollará sobre la base de ejercicios prácticos.                                                                                                                                           

Como institución del sistema de ONU, el conocimiento y comprensión de su historia, instituciones y protocolos
de actuación en las más importantes áreas del sistema universal, constituyen una parte fundamental del programa.
En este curso se contará con la participación de los representantes de las agencias de la ONU como PNUD,
ACNUR, UNESCO, UN WOMAN, UNICEF y la sede regional de la OEA, que se encuentran representadas en
Costa Rica. La Organización de las Naciones Unidas en el contexto histórico, socio-político y económico en el mundo.

Ever since its establishment in 1945, the United Nations has played a pivotal role in a great variety of affairs, large or small, international and national. As such the UN has played an incisive role in the lives of people around the world. Much of what the UN does is taken for granted and even goes unnoticed by the larger public, even as an oft quoted saying argues that ‘if the UN did not exist it would have to be invented’. At the same time, millions around the world look to the UN expecting it to address many of the enormous challenges faced by humankind. This complex dynamics is complemented by the fact that the UN is both reliant on what the member states want, while at the same time being much more than the sum of its members. This course provides a comprehensive and rigorous introduction into the UN system, including its origins and history, its organizational framework  and the  functioning of various organs, agencies, bodies and programmes.  Students will critically examine the most important areas of the UN mission including the key Charter pillars of international peace and security, economic and social progress and development and human rights as well as a growing list of priorities and initiatives (e.g., gender equality and  mainstreaming; eliminating gender-based violence; environmental protection; addressing climate change; post-2015 development agenda; Global Education First Initiative; action to counter terrorism; R2P, etc). In addition, the course offers a close look at some of the challenges the UN faces, and discusses various proposals for its reform. Students will also be encouraged to reflect on how UN priorities and initiatives can be constructively addressed in their respective fields and programmes of peace studies.

This course will cover the following topics:

  • What problem is your organization addressing, and how?
  • How can you implement a program to help you measure the impact and outputs that your organization is generating?  What tools should you be using to do so?
  • How can you institutionalize the monitoring of your organization, and use the information gathered to influence your planning, decision-making and communications in the future?

This course explores conflict, insecurity and collaboration in relation to scarcity, poor quality, and variability of freshwater resources. Students will examine disputes and conflict over access to fresh water resources and rivers, including dam construction.  

A special focus will be on how conflict over transboundary freshwater resources has fostered peace building through cooperative co-management. Throughout the course, mechanisms and instruments will be introduced to assist the resolution and prevention of water-related conflict and insecurity including: international law; institutional arrangements; governance and policy reform; and involvement of civil society organizations.

This course constitutes an advanced seminar in Gender Studies specifically as it applies to peace building, violence, conflict creation and resolution. It examines the complex relationships between gender(s), race, ethnicity, nationalism, religion, militarization and masculinities-femininities both in the domestic and the public spheres. The entire focus of the course is in assessing the possibilities of engendering, from a   power dynamics perspective, notions of peace, security conflict, justice, reconstruction, reparations, pre-post conflict gender arrangements and in challenging discourses and practices which invisibilize, minimize or justify the domination of women worldwide. It intends to give students a theoretical lens from which to examine Gender and Peace Building. The course also examines Gender equality as a prerequisite for Human Security as it allows for the capture of its socio- cultural dimension and strengthens the contributions to Peace Education. The course will also clarify education as a system involved in maintaining gender inequality. In addition, exemplars will be provided of how a critical and transformative education paradigm is essential in overcoming patriarchy and thereby contribute to the goals of peace building.

This course provides a basic introduction to the concept of “Security Sector Reform” (SSR) which is widely recognized as a vital component of building sustainable peace in societies in post-conflict contexts. Such reform is necessary to enhance the security and safety of people and for preventing emerging or recurring crises and conflicts. Through a critical analysis of policies, procedures, programs, activities and case studies in global, regional and local contexts, the course will clarify how Governments and intergovernmental agencies can improve the provision of security, safety and justice to citizens and institutions based on the rule of law and related standards or principles of human rights, gender equality, human security, transparency, accountability, democratic participation and good governance. Specific security sector reforms to be examined include disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) programs vital in the transition from the ending of armed conflict to a peaceful societal order; reform of various law and order and defense agencies (e.g. armed forces; police; justice, national security) and the establishment of effective civilian oversight of the security system. Emphasis will also be placed in this course on major UN policy and operational areas for supporting SSR, including peacekeeping, DDR and post-conflict peacebuilding, and the role of the United Nations Inter-Agency Security Sector Reform Task Force (IASSRTF) to “promote an integrated, holistic and coherent United Nations security sector reform (SSR) approach that envisages to assist States and societies in establishing effective, inclusive and accountable security”. The civil society-led initiative of a United Nations Emergency Peace Service (UNEPS) will also be explored in terms of its potential positive contributions to international Security Sector Reform.

This course serves as a specialized introduction to the field of media and peace studies and establishes the historical context and thematic focus that will be developed throughout the IPS-MPCS programme. Key concepts from journalism, communications, and media studies are reviewed and evaluated in light of their contributions to our understanding of peace and war, and discussed in the context of 21st century media networks and technologies. Course content addresses contemporary concerns related to propaganda and conflict escalation, censorship and freedom of speech, privacy and surveillance, as well as the potential for greater cross-cultural exchange, collective problem-solving, global civic engagement, and individual empowerment through open access to information. Participants are also equipped with practical tools for critical analysis and media literacy.

Deforestation is seen by many as one of the main global environmental challenges of our times, because of its significant impact on biodiversity and its important contribution to Global Warming. This course analyzes the way deforestation has been and is being explained by both mainstream and alternative narratives, critically engages with the way it is defined and measured, and discusses the various attempts in stopping or reducing it. Additionally, this course takes a look at the links between poverty and deforestation, some of the possible strategies to reduce poverty through forest-based activities, and analyzes and discusses the importance of forests for humans and the challenges faced by those who try to manage them sustainably.

This course is a broad examination of the notion of economic development: its theory, practice as well as policies but with a specific emphasis on the concept of sustainability, at social, economic, cultural and political level. It will offer students an opportunity to better understand the concept of economic development from the traditional point of view where the analysis of the economic progress of nations was only measured by economic growth, to the present debate concerning development, which is focusing more on poverty and inequality as well as on questions concerning governance. 

During the course special attention will be given to the role of conflict in development.  

The course will discuss both national and international development issues, such as international trade, finance and climate change. Special attention will be given to various aspects of globalisation, including international governance and international negotiations.  

During the course both development theories will be discussed as well as practical experiences in development policy making and peace building.

This course is a broad examination of the notion of (economic) development: theory, practice and politics. Special attention will be given to sustainability, inequality and conflict. Both economic, social, cultural and political dimensions will be discussed.  

Main topics are: 

  • Theories of growth and development

  • Poverty

  • Conflict in processes of development.

  • Governance and policy making

  • Globalisation

  • Peacekeeping and peacebuilding 

    The course will discuss both national and international development issues, such as international finance and trade, climate change, and the 2030 Global Agenda for Sustainable Development. Special attention will be given to international governance, international cooperation and international negotiations. 

    During the course both theory and practice of policy making will be discussed. Due attention will be given to political dimensions.

This certificate course introduces learners to the various dimensions of human rights protection as it applies to Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs). The rise of internal conflicts in the last couple of decades, accompanied with natural disasters in many poorest parts of the world, has led to emergence of more than 27 million IDPs today. It is obvious that their particularly vulnerable situation creates deep inroads into their human rights. This course addresses the international legal principles and guidelines for protection of IDPs, and the operational challenges to their protection and durable solutions. The course is designed to provide a contemporary flavour to the topic using recent and emerging crises situations around the world as case examples. The course begins with an overview of the contexts in which IDPs emerge in today’s world, before addressing the international and regional legal frameworks for the protection of their human rights. The institutional dimension of operational responses is then analyzed by understanding and deconstructing the Cluster Approach, as well as the role of UNHCR in the protection of IDPs. The role of civil society as well as gender dimensions of protection of IDPs is then analyzed. Finally, the course looks at the possible durable solutions and contemporary challenges thereto in the context of IDPs.
More information at http://www.hrc.upeace.org/2015/09/protection-of-internally-displaced-persons-2015/

Human Rights form one of the most important branches of international law and policy in the contemporary world. The experience of the 'scourge of war' during and in the immediate aftermath of World War II brought a new international recognition and focus to the rights of human beings. Today, there are several international treaties guaranteeing a wide range of rights to human beings, both in times of peace and in conflicts. These instruments also impose obligations upon States to respect, protect and fulfill those rights. Under the aegis of the United Nations and regional organizations, several bodies have been established to monitor violations of the rights of human beings. Despite these efforts, we continue to live in a world where these rights are structurally abused. Today, like never before, there is an amplified need for students and professionals from all spheres of life to not only understand and mainstream human rights into their activities, but also to be prepared to meet the growing challenges posed by current and emerging global issues. This course therefore introduces participants to the international legal human rights regime, including bottom-up approaches for the promotion of human rights and accountability for violations thereof. The course will cover a broad spectrum of foundational issues in the field of human rights, beginning with the diverse legal and non-legal approaches to the field and ending with contemporary challenges thereto.

 

 

It will cover the following topic areas:

  • Week 1: Sustainability and Sustainable Development
  • Week 2: The Power of Regenerative Leaders
  • Week 3: Other Sustainability Frameworks and Tools
  • Week 4: Strategic Planning for Sustainability: The Pyramid Process

This six week specialized online course introduces participants to the gender dimensions of the interface between development and human rights. Social constructions shape our identity, and thus, have critical impact on our daily lives. Diverse gender identities and concepts are taught in formal and informal educational institutions and determine our past, present and future, and may lead to inequality. Gender inequality and inequity then, may lead to human (and women’s) rights violations. This course will give an introduction to the solutions suggested by Gender Mainstreaming to gender inequality in human rights and development work based on the analysis of social constructions and through gender sensitive educational tools. By means of e-conversations and dialogue, the training will combine academic theory with participants’ lived and work experiences. The course will provide participants with the skills to conduct gender analysis in order to ensure gender mainstreaming in human rights and development work. It will also explore mechanisms for human rights sensitive development intervention with a strong focus on gender equality. Finally, the course will explore the intersections between human rights and gender through an analysis of contemporary issues such as gender based violence, trafficking, sex work, contemporary slavery etc, which impede the quest for sustainable development.
More information at http://www.hrc.upeace.org/2015/09/gender-development-and-human-rights-2016/

This six week specialized online course introduces participants to the gender dimensions of the interface between development and human rights. Social constructions shape our identity, and thus, have critical impact on our daily lives. Diverse gender identities and concepts are taught in formal and informal educational institutions and determine our past, present and future, and may lead to inequality. Gender inequality and inequity then, may lead to human (and women’s) rights violations. This course will give an introduction to the solutions suggested by Gender Mainstreaming to gender inequality in human rights and development work based on the analysis of social constructions and through gender sensitive educational tools. By means of e-conversations and dialogue, the training will combine academic theory with participants’ lived and work experiences. The course will provide participants with the skills to conduct gender analysis in order to ensure gender mainstreaming in human rights and development work. It will also explore mechanisms for human rights sensitive development intervention with a strong focus on gender equality. Finally, the course will explore the intersections between human rights and gender through an analysis of contemporary issues such as gender based violence, trafficking, sex work, contemporary slavery etc, which impede the quest for sustainable development.

More information at http://www.hrc.upeace.org/2015/09/gender-development-and-human-rights-2016/

Siguiendo el mandato de la Carta de la Universidad para la Paz, se presenta una introducción a los estudios de paz y conflicto en el contexto global, inclusivo y contemporáneo actual, entregando a l@s cursantes una visión general del mismo, lo que les dará las herramientas básicas para profundizar posteriormente y en el transcurso del programa sobre los mismos elementos. Tomando en cuenta que la Carta de la UPAZ le otorga el mandato de incluir en sus programas el estudio de la irenologia, utilizándola como método de análisis de las relaciones internacionales, se evaluaran las definiciones de paz, de conflictos declarados y no declarados, de potenciales soluciones y transformaciones de estos conflictos, así como los fundamentos teóricos de la paz; aproximando sus fundamentos doctrinarios al análisis del contexto político internacional actual. Esta gestión académica permite abordar el concepto sobre la Paz en los términos de la UNESCO, esto es, que la Paz no es solo la ausencia de la guerra si no también la satisfacción de todas las necesidades humanas, incluyendo la realización de la justicia, el desarrollo económico y social equilibrado, la desaparición de la violencia estructural, la pobreza, la desigualdad, el racismo, la xenofobia, y los prejuicios y estereotipos culturales negativos. Filosofía de la paz y de la no violencia.

This course on Disarmament and Peace constitutes the first effort for approaching, in a comprehensive fashion, one of the most sensitive issues threatening the very existence of Humanity: the tangible danger of nuclear, biological, chemical and small or light weapons along with international conventions related to weapons of mass destructions, cluster Munitions and land mines, their relations with terrorism and the economic and social consequences of the arms race, as the resources devoted to huge arsenals, both-- nuclear and conventional-- restrict the amount of funds that can be devoted to science, education, environmental protection and development.

These subjects will be approached, essentially, from the role of that academia, human rights defenders and civil society must play for having a saying to  control the destruction of Humanity.

All social interactions, from personal relationships to international arena, experience opposing preferences. Hence an introductory course on the theory and practice of negotiation and mediation is essential for understanding topics as diverse as marital disputes, organizational relations, community conflicts, group decision-making and international relations. It will enhance one's ability to critically review situations in order to find and adopt a mutually accepted solution to a given situation. This course is therefore designed to serve as a broad introduction to the nature, scope, theories and practices of negotiation and mediation. The course will examine the complex and yet essential roles of negotiation and mediation as part of the main procedures of dealing with opposing preferences and as models of constructive conflict transformation. The course will set the context with a discussion on the nature, assumptions, emotions and decision-making approaches involved in negotiations, the dynamics revolving around it and the gender perspective to it. It will also examine the various objectives, considerations, essences and processes of mediation.  The course utilizes participatory and interactive pedagogies.

The course will challenge and examine the role that sports play in conflict resolution, as part of the methodology of Peace Education at large. Sport has played a constructive role in bringing two conflicting sides together. The course will confront with the questions:  What is Sport for development (and conflict resolution as a branch of this field)? What can Sport contribute to Peacbuilding? How sport can play a constructive role in conflict prevention and conflict transformation? What examples in the world should we carefully look at and learn from and is Sport alone is enough? Finally, the students will have the chance to set their own “recipe for success” through building a toolkit for using sport as a tool for conflict transformation or analyzing an international conflict zone and how sport plays (or played) a role in breaking those barriers.

The course aims at strengthening the capacity of scientists, administrators and students to respond to specific donor demands, to achieve complementary funding for projects (Project Funding) and institutions (Endowment Fund).

This is an instrumental course and systematically develops a logical framework-based project matrix, which is used by most international agencies, a concept paper, and provides an overview of potential funding sources and options.

The course is oriented towards the needs of the participants. They start the course with their own project idea in which external funding is required and finalize with concrete results such as a project planning matrix, project profile and potential donors identified to launch the project.

This course will provide a brief introduction to the particularities of coastal and oceanic resources and ecologies. Second, we will investigate the unique attributes of the human economic, social, and cultural systems (i.e. fishing, fisherman and fishing cultures) that are most directly dependent upon them. Among the many topics within this section, the course will specifically focus on understanding artisanal fisheries, large-scale/industrial fishing, and aquaculture, as well as the differences and conflicts that exist between these methods of resource extraction. Third, a broad overview of the development of the current resource crises and conflicts will be presented and examined via case studies from throughout the globe. Fourth, the evolution of and trends in coastal and marine management over the last century will also be a central aspect of this course.  

Thus, we will explore the evolution from traditional top-down models to the implementation of stakeholder inclusion participation, and comanagment. We will also thoroughly review the role of marine parks, protected areas, and no-take reserves in the management and conservation of coastal resources. Finally, through practical exercises, guest lectures, and field visits, students will be able to explore the complex nexus of relations between humans and coastal/marine resources as it applies to Latin America and the case of Costa Rica.  

In sum, students in this course will gain insight into and knowledge of how we have moved from the naïve perspectives of Mare Liberum and the inexhaustibility of oceanic resources, which were predominant in the 19th century, to the increasingly complex layers of marine tenure systems, marine protected areas, and precautionary approaches that characterize contemporary 21st century marine and coastal resource management regimes.

This course explores contemporary trends in sustainable agriculture and agroecology. The course begins by building a framework of the different ways in which sustainable agriculture is practiced. We relate these contemporary practices to the capitalist transformation of agriculture in the 20th century. We then ground our academic study of the transformation of agricultural practices in actual existing famers and agribusiness. We will visit a Dole banana plantation, the Corsicana organic pineapple plantation and two small organic farms all in the Caribbean plain of Costa Rica. The field trip gives an opportunity to view how course topics inform contemporary agricultural practices. In the second week of class we examine how trade, globalization and hybrid / GM technologies have accelerated the transformation of agriculture. We pay particular attention to the role of science in this transformation via case studies of organics, transgenics, and the IAASTD report. We end with a focus on population and its role in agricultural transformation, institutional projects to promote agro-ecology, and a move towards local food production and consumption.

This course introduces students to the public international law dimensions of conflicts and peace. It explores the international legal standards, both in treaty law and in customary international law, that underpin the prevention, management and resolution of inter-state and intra-state conflicts. Students will specifically be introduced to jus ad bellum (Law of War and use of force), jus in bello (International Humanitarian Law), and the responsibility to protect (R2P) doctrine. The course adopts a diverse range of approaches in order to examine the rules, procedures, successes and failures of key international organizations, including the United Nations, as well as regional organizations, in responding to peace and conflict situations. The course will explore several case studies of actual policy responses, or lack thereof. Participants will also learn about the limits that international law places on states and non-state actors in peace and conflict situations, before moving into a critical discussion on the debates surrounding enforcement of those standards in international law. Finally, the course will explore how international law intersects with other areas of inquiry related to peace and conflict studies, in order to promote multi-pronged responses to peace and conflict situations.

The central goal of this course is to provide the students with a critical understanding of research methodologies used in the social sciences, particularly those that are relevant to peace and conflict studies and peace-building. Students will also get an introduction into the field of peace education as a tool for various research fields in peace studies. Initially, students will explore conceptual and theoretical perspectives underlying various paradigms in research methodology, including modern and post-modern as well as quantitative and qualitative approaches. Informed by post-positivist concerns, the course will raise students’ awareness of their relational and ethical position vis-à-vis their research. Drawing on examples of studies in diverse conflict and peacebuilding contexts, students will also be introduced to the design and conduct of a research study including a range of specific research methods such as surveys, interviews, content analysis, case-studies, participatory action research, evaluation research, ethnography, and feminist and indigenous approaches. The orientation, process and potential of these approaches to enact change towards social justice will be examined. Drawing from several exemplars, some ethical considerations, accountability, strengths and limitations for making a difference in terms of social justice will also be discussed. Throughout the research process, ethical issues will be emphasised, especially gender equity and rights of subordinated groups.

Economics play an important role in organising human activity. This course is an introduction to the histories, actualities, and futures of economic thinking. The purpose is to review the most influential economic theories, and related concepts, in the light of contemporary ecosocial challenges. While reviewing the spectrum of theories from growth to non-growth, and degrowth economics, we analyse the following questions: what is economics; how do economic processes work; what and who is economics for; who are the economic actors, and what kinds of roles have they been assigned (and by whom); why and when is economics important; and what are the underlying assumptions behind different economic theories? The course will provide the students with an understanding of, and ability to operate with, main economic theories and concepts.

Global governance deals with the complexity of current international relations and new developments of public international law and administrative law. In a progressively more fragmented international framework, global governance seeks to improve the capacity of the international community to face common challenges and global problems, given the absence of a world government. The paradox of ‘governance’ without ‘government’ lies at its core, looking “for order in disorder, for coherence in contradiction, and for continuity in change” (J. N. Rosenau).
Through the lenses of four important non-state actors, the course will introduce some of the fundamental concepts of the “law of global governance”, focusing in particular on the role that non-state actors can play in promoting higher human rights and democracy standards at the national level. The overcoming of the nation-state paradigm has been indeed one of the most important developments in the contemporary legal ‘brave new world’. In the last decade of the XX century, numerous non-state actors emerged as meaningful players in global governance issues, flanking states on the international scene. International/supranational organizations, international courts, legal experts, non-governmental organizations represent as many voices in the global governance discourse, which may in turn complement, threaten or reinforces state’s action in the global arena. After having introduced what global governance is (or should be), the course will analyze, through concrete case-studies, the role of the European Union, the Venice Commission, the UN Democracy Fund and the European Court of Human Rights in addressing new global governance challenges related with human rights protection and democracy promotion. In the conclusion it will examine the potential limits and possibility of rethinking global governance.

El curso tiene como objetivo sentar bases teóricas sobre los derechos humanos, abordando los aspéctos históricos, contemporáneos, filosóficos, jurídicos e institucionales de su desarrollo. Se evaluará criticamente la implementación tanto de las convenciones y tratados internacionales, así como sus correspondientes mecanismos de monitoreo y los regimenes especiales creados con propósitos de seguir problemas de derechos humanos de carácter específico. Se analizarán, además, las diversas resoluciones tomadas por las Naciones Unidas en los esfuerzos para fomentar un mundo más pacífico e inclusivo y se estudiará --de breve manera-- los retos actuales que se le prsentan a la Organización. Durante este curso se desarrollará una visita a la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos y a una audiencia de uno de los casos, en concordancia con la agenda del máximo órgano jurídico en la materia en el hemisferio. Concepto y evolución de los derechos humanos y su importancia histórica y socio-política en el desarrollo de la sociedad.

Gross violations of human rights, including war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide are have characterized a number of contemporary conflicts and authoritarian regimes. In such contexts, questions of impunity and accountability become central to peacebuilding and reconstruction of post-conflict societies. Yet, criminal prosecution of persecutors poses challenges for post-conflict reconciliation, particularly when such reconciliation is contingent upon demands for amnesty. This course takes a holistic view on the debates surrounding linkages between serious crimes and justice.

The first part of the course provides a general introduction to the field of international criminal law. It focuses on the evolution of international crimes under international law and the role of international criminal courts in the prosecution of international crimes. Students will analyze the jurisdictional reach of international criminal courts, their relationship with national jurisdictions (primacy v. complementarity) and the impact of the interests of justice and peace in the exercise of their jurisdiction. Students will also explore the objective and subjective elements of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. Particular attention will be placed on those elements of international crimes that make them distinguishable from ordinary crimes, and on the manner in which criminal responsibility is determined by international criminal courts.

The second part of the course focuses on transitional justice, which includes the study of justice in times of transition following periods of widespread human rights abuse. These transitional periods raise a wide range of legal, ethical, and political questions that are central to the peace versus justice debate. Students will explore the strengths and limits of criminal prosecutions and the alternative mechanisms available to address the commission of international crimes. Using numerous case studies from around the world, the course will provide students with analytical tools to grapple with and to discuss the most salient issues decision-makers face in the context of transitional democracies and other situations of dealing with the past.

The Hybrid Diploma in Social Innovation is awarded upon completing 5 of the UPEACE Centre’s courses within a period of 18 months, including one onsite professional development workshop.  You will begin the program in Costa Rica from December 5-7, 2016 for the Positive Leadership seminar. Also required is the online course ‘Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Social Change.’ 

In addition to these courses, you may choose 3 more from the following options:

  • Skills for Effective Negotiations
  • Designing Your Life: Innovating From the Inside Out
  • Educating in Changing Times: Reflect, Rethink, Rebuild
  • Mission Impossible: Measuring Outcomes & Impact
  • Social Media for Social Innovation

These courses are offered several times during the year, so make sure to check our list of courses and their upcoming dates.  In order to enroll in these courses, just send us your choice of courses, so we can reserve your space. 

Please note that travel expenses to and in Costa Rica for the Positive Leadership workshop are not included in the Hybrid Diploma cost of $2,395.

This course will cover the following themes:

  • Integral Leadership
  • Appreciative Inquiry
  • Self-Evaluation and energy audit
  • Conflict Style and Resolution
  • Practicing Innovative Thinking
  • Getting Things Done

The physical risk reduction capacity of ecosystems depends on their health and structure, and the intensity of the hazard event. Degraded ecosystems can still play a buffering role, although to a much lesser extent than fully functioning ecosystems. Healthy ecosystems reduce social-economic vulnerability by sustaining human livelihoods and providing essential goods such as food, fibre, medicines and construction materials. For example, in addition to providing coastal hazard protection, mangroves and seagrass beds support fishing and tourism activities and store high amounts of carbon.  Ecosystems can reduce physical exposure to common natural hazards, namely landslides, flooding, avalanches, storm surges, wildfires and drought, by serving as natural infrastructure, protective barriers or buffers. For example, in the European Alps, mountain forests have a long history of being managed for protection against avalanches and rockfall. Protection forests in Switzerland, have been valued at USD $1,000 per hectare per year along mountain roads and the state provides considerable financial incentives to manage forests for hazard protection.

This course analyzes the nature and evolution of systems of governance to address climate change at the international, national, and local levels, charting the changing history of climate policy from the issue's initial introduction into political discussion to its recent ascension to become the new "master concept" of environmental governance generally.  The roles of various stakeholders in the negotiation, including transnational institutions, nation states, nongovernmental organizations, private businesses, and municipal governments, will be examined, as will the efficacy of different mechanisms (state-led, market-based, hybrid, etc.) for enacting climate policy.  The potential impact of climate policy on particular environmental issues (e.g., hydroelectric and nuclear power) and social groups (e.g., women, minorities, indigenous peoples) will be discussed as well.  Case studies will examine specific instances of climate policy and negotiation, including recent UNFCCC conferences, Costa Rica's own payment for environmental services (PES) and "Peace with Nature" climate neutrality initiative, and the emerging debate over proposed REDD (Reduced Emissions through Deforestation and Degradation) mechanisms.

The central goal of this course is to provide an introduction to a variety of research approaches and methods in the social sciences. The aim of the course is to enable students to develop their own research designs as well as be able to critique the research designs of others. Students will be exposed to different research methodologies (quantitative and qualitative), and data analysis techniques.

The student in this course will be required:  to read compulsory readings and optional ones, to interact with fellow participants and instructors, listening to weekly presentations by the Instructors and most importantly, critical self-reflection. At the end of the Course, the student will have a research design that should be conducted as part of their professional work and is  an academic requirement for a course.

This course is designed to provide theoretical as well as field-based knowledge on the gender dimensions of peacekeeping and humanitarian assistance. Throughout the three weeks, the students will be exposed to the major trends that have been used for the integration of a gender perspective in peacekeeping and humanitarian fields. Students will critically examine the theories and policies that underpin programming to gain a thorough understanding of gender integration as an essential element in the delivery of effective programming in peacekeeping and humanitarian assistance. Students will also learn from the on-the-ground experience and knowledge of practitioners on how these theories and policies are put into practice in the field. At the end of the three-week course, the students shall have a deeper understanding and overview of the theory and praxis of gender mainstreaming in peacekeeping operations and humanitarian assistance as well as the ability to analyse any current situation from a gender perspective.

This course examines theories of media ethics and their relationship to contemporary media production. Lectures and course materials explore and question concepts such as objectivity, neutrality, and truth, as well as various “alternative” ethical paradigms that value “immersion” and “advocacy” on the part of media professionals. In this context, the concept of peace journalism is introduced and analyzed in depth. Participants will learn to recognize, analyze, and practice Peace Journalism, and discuss its potential for creating an informational context conducive to peace and supportive of peace initiatives and peacemakers, without compromising the basic principles of good journalism.

In a holistic framework of peace education, one key dimension emphasizes factors, relationships, structures and processes encompassing the broad concept of “culture”.  This course clarifies the concept of cultural identity and its role in influencing the dynamics of conflicts and strategies for resolving or transforming such conflicts. The consequences of various forms of discrimination, including prejudices, stereotyping, ethnocentrism and racism, on building a culture of peace will also be examined. The course also focuses on marginalized groups facing discrimination and other facets of cultural and structural violence, including indigenous peoples, women, sexual minorities and persons with disabilities. Exemplars from local, national and regional case-studies will provide insights on the vital role of education in transcending such discrimination and violence. The course also contrasts alternative paradigms of multiculturalism and related strategies of multicultural education. Finally, the emergent roles played by the dialogue of civilizations and interfaith dialogue in fostering and educating for a culture of peace in diverse countries and regions as well as at international levels, will be examined.

Desde el inicio del debate internacional sobre la necesidad de un desarrollo con responsabilidad intergeneracional, la agenda en la materia se ha complejizado en todos los aspectos, políticos, sociales, jurídicos e institucionales. El curso abordará los diversos aspectos del tema, incluido los últimos desafíos del cambio climático y el impacto diferencial sobre mujeres y hombres que este tiene. Se examinará la agenda para el 2030 del Desarrollo Sostenible acordado en New York en el 2015 por las Naciones Unidas que consolidará los Objetivos del Milenio que finalizan en el 2015 La eliminación de la pobreza y el hambre, la desigualdad en y entre países; la construcción de sociedades pacificas; la protección de los derechos humanos; la promoción la igualdad de género y asegurar a largo plazo la protección del planeta y sus recursos son centrales en esta nueva propuesta. Consolidando los Objetivos del Milenio para asegurar un futuro de Paz para la Humanidad.

This course introduces students to the struggles of Kurds in the context of genocides committed against them in the past as well as in the current ongoing conflict against ISIS. It explores the Kurdish national movement and its prospects and challenges. At the end of the course, the students will have an understanding of the history of the Kurds in the Middle East with specific emphasis on the Kurds of Iraq from the birth of Kurdish nationalism to the present day. The first session will offer an overview of the history of the Kurds and their relation with the succeeding Iraqi governments. The second session will cover the history of genocides in Iraq against the Kurds and other minorities exploring the causes and the consequences for the political and social stability of the area. The third session will focus on the heritage that this culture of violence has created in the area and the genocides committed by ISIS. The fourth session will discuss the future of Iraq and the Kurds in the context of the Middle East. The last session will explore which is the future of Iraq as a country after the liberation of Mosul and the new balance of power born from the end of the war with ISIS and the definitive collapse of the order established in 1916 with the Sykes-Picot Agreement.

Hoy en día el Internet presenta diferentes desafíos para la promoción y protección de los derechos humanos. La disponibilidad de diversas plataformas digitales favorece la búsqueda y distribución de información sin limitaciones y sin considerar las fronteras, lo que a su vez promueve el ejercicio de los derechos humanos y transforma las obligaciones de los estados. Esta situación está modificando nuestro entendimiento de lo que significa proteger, respetar y garantizar los derechos humanos en la era digital.
Tomando en consideración estos cambios, este curso está diseñado para que los estudiantes consideren de forma crítica y desde una perspectiva legal como los cambios tecnológicos afectan sus derechos. El curso será impartido en 5 sesiones que de forma progresiva introducirán los principales temas de discusión en torno al ejercicio de los derechos humanos a través del uso de plataformas digitales.
En primer lugar el curso estará enfocado en los aspectos sociales que favorecen el desarrollo de nuevas tecnologías, y otorgará las herramientas necesarias para considerar porqué la sociedad contemporánea depende de la disponibilidad de tecnologías con acceso al Internet. En las siguientes tres sesiones, los estudiantes evaluarán los principales tratados internacionales de protección de derechos humanos a fin de reconocer cómo se encuentran protegidos estos derechos, cuáles son las obligaciones de los estados, y qué tipo de limitaciones pueden ser impuestas por los estados. Finalmente, los estudiantes discutirán algunos de los temas contemporáneos más relevantes respecto de la promoción de los derechos humanos en Internet, tales como protección de periodistas, el rol de los Proveedores de Servicios de Internet, y la guerra contra el terrorismo.

Gross violations of human rights, including war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide are have characterized a number of contemporary conflicts and authoritarian regimes. In such contexts, questions of impunity and accountability become central to peacebuilding and reconstruction of post-conflict societies. Yet, criminal prosecution of persecutors poses challenges for post-conflict reconciliation, particularly when such reconciliation is contingent upon demands for amnesty. This course takes a holistic view on the debates surrounding linkages between serious crimes and justice.

The first part of the course provides a general introduction to the field of international criminal law. It focuses on the evolution of international crimes under international law and the role of international criminal courts in the prosecution of international crimes. Students will analyze the jurisdictional reach of international criminal courts, their relationship with national jurisdictions (primacy v. complementarity) and the impact of the interests of justice and peace in the exercise of their jurisdiction. Students will also explore the objective and subjective elements of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. Particular attention will be placed on those elements of international crimes that make them distinguishable from ordinary crimes, and on the manner in which criminal responsibility is determined by international criminal courts.

The second part of the course focuses on transitional justice, which includes the study of justice in times of transition following periods of widespread human rights abuse. These transitional periods raise a wide range of legal, ethical, and political questions that are central to the peace versus justice debate. Students will explore the strengths and limits of criminal prosecutions and the alternative mechanisms available to address the commission of international crimes. Using numerous case studies from around the world, the course will provide students with analytical tools to grapple with and to discuss the most salient issues decision-makers face in the context of transitional democracies and other situations of dealing with the past.

On 25 September, 2015, the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted a new and ambitious collective global plan of action for transforming our world by 2030 through the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The SDGs, which are part and parcel of the 2030 Agenda, replace and build upon the previous Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) which ran their course in 2015. The advancement of the SDGs over the MDGs is not only in its scope – there are now 17 Goals as against the previous 8 – but also in some of the known structural shortcomings in the design of targets and indicators of the MDGs.

The global agenda for development, including development aid, financing, and international cooperation, for the next 15 years will likely gravitate around the SDGs. Indeed, the 2030 Agenda calls for a convergence around the SDGs of responses to several contemporary issues of global concern, whether related to climate change, human rights, peace and security, gender equality, migration, safe cities, rule of law, good governance, education, health, multilateral trade, investment, amongst others. However, a successful implementation of the SDGs can only result from learning the lessons from the MDG story where despite admirable progress in some goals, some others unfortunately remained off-track.

This course introduces participants to the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs, their improvements over the MDGs, the means of implementation, and the challenges thereto. Participants working in, or interested in working in, fields related to development, peace, human rights, environment, gender etc. will gain a comprehensive overview of this new global agenda, which more than ever, requires practitioners with the necessary knowledge, skills and tools to implement it.

The course aims at understanding the impact of climate change on the global environment and on human activity.  Climate change increases risks to human livelihoods and as such may endanger the security of individuals and groups. This in turn could increase the propensity for conflict within and between states.

Components of the course will include a critical examination of the drivers of climate change, largely induced by human activity, and a review of international efforts to limit the magnitude of climate changes, including those concluded in Kyoto and Copenhagen. Consequences of climate change for human health, for economic activity, for resource use and resource availability will also be examined, as will be the options for adapting to climate change.

The examination of climate changes will be viewed within the broader context of the current demographic, economic and political global reality. Introductory comments and discussions led by the instructor will be followed by seminars with broad student input.

Revolutionary armed conflict was once considered the only way for oppressed peoples to change severe injustice and oppression. Bloodshed was deemed necessary, often justified by the cliché that what was taken by violence can only be retrieved by violence. In the last decades of the 20th century, however, it became clear that armed insurrection is not the only choice for aggrieved groups and societies, and that nonviolent civil resistance, relying on a variety of forms of nonviolent action, could bring some impressive results. Some failures also occurred. Although this phenomenon has been coherently utilized to achieve political and social change for well over a century by groups, peoples, and societies in differing cultures and political systems, only recently has it gained respect as a potentially formidable strategic force by policy makers, political analysts, scholars, peacemakers, and international specialists of many fields.

Contemporary dictatorships and tyrants have collapsed from the pressure exerted by popular mass movements of nonviolent action, in countries such as the former Czechoslovakia, Chile, East Germany, Georgia on the Black Sea, the Philippines, Poland, Serbia, South Africa, or Ukraine, to name a few. In 2010–11, national nonviolent movements in Tunisia and Egypt changed the face of North Africa and the Middle East. Evidence  shows that countries that experience bottom-up, grass-roots nonviolent struggle are more likely to sustain human rights and democracy once established than when armed insurrection is used, and that nonviolent movements succeed more often than violent insurrections. Given this record, it is important for would-be peacemakers to explore systematically the theories, methods, dynamics, and strategies of such movements.

This certificate course offered by the Human Rights Center of the University for Peace will introduce participants to the increasingly significant field of indigenous peoples’ rights and looks at the contemporary issues that have paradoxically led to a recognition of those rights on the one hand, while simultaneously challenging their implementation on the other. The course will address the broad spectrum of issues involved in the field of indigenous peoples’ rights, beginning with who qualifies to be “indigenous peoples”, the scope of their right to self-determination, the international and regional legal frameworks for the protection of their rights and the challenges associated therewith, and the debates surrounding the concept of indigenous governance. The course will also look closely into human security and human development issues relating to indigenous peoples, the role of investment, extractive industries and other business corporations in indigenous reservations/areas, and the effect of intellectual property rights on the traditional knowledge of indigenous peoples. Strong emphasis will be placed throughout the course on case studies from around the world. Participants will explore debates on mainstreaming versus autonomy, participatory governance, scope of ‘free and prior consent’ and the right to development, amongst others.
More information at http://www.hrc.upeace.org/2015/10/indigenous-peoples-rights-and-development-2016/

The experience of the ‘scourge of war’ during and in the immediate aftermath of World War II brought about a new international recognition and focus to the rights of human beings. Today, there are several international treaties guaranteeing a wide range of human rights. International and regional mechanisms to monitor and enforce compliance of human rights have proliferated. Despite these efforts, we continue to live in a world where human rights are rampantly abused at all levels. Contemporary global events have in fact led to a significant rise in xenophobia and racism, which are in turn posing challenges to the universality of international human rights norms. Today, like never before, there is an amplified need for professionals from all spheres of life to not only understand and mainstream human rights into their activities and policies, but also to be prepared to meet the growing challenges posed by current and emerging global issues.
This 9 week specialized certificate course consciously adopts a contemporary focus for unpacking the diverse dimensions of international human rights law, practice and advocacy. It begins with a juxtaposition of human rights in theory and in practice, and situates the very concept on a spectrum of competing approaches adopted by contemporary thinkers. Having thus set the tone for a critical and realistic analysis of contemporary human rights issues, the course examines the notion of universality of human rights with the use of case studies from recent global events. Participants will thereafter analyze human rights norms encompassed within the two International Covenants viz. on Civil and Political Rights, and on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and after critically evaluating the falsity of these distinctions in their applicability to the modern globalized world, will also examine specific challenges to their implementation. The course will further analyze human rights in the context of lived realities of women, before moving on to examining challenges to the protection of vulnerable groups and persons such as children, forced migrants, and indigenous persons, as well as the politicization of collective rights. Finally, participants will discuss and debate on challenges to the enforcement and compliance of human rights as well as the role of civil society and non-state actors in the promotion of human rights in a globalized world.
More information at http://www.hrc.upeace.org/2016/07/protection-of-human-rights-in-the-contemporary-world-practices-challenges-and-prospects-18-jan-to-21-mar-2017/

The course follows an interdisciplinary approach involving several fields of studies such as: human rights (political and philosophical origins); gender, cultural and peace studies. It offers a re-examination of concepts such as human rights, dignity, justice, equality and peace along with the idea of “world citizenship” - worldliness or the cosmopolitan idea of humanity, as an answer to the ongoing challenges, discourses and trends. The main aim of the course will be to provide a re-thinking of human rights in the 21st century, as a way of addressing not only the growing “rightlessness” and “statelessness” and massive violations of human rights, but also to offer an understanding of the importance of the concepts of “dignity” and “world citizenship”, as central to human rights and peace. The course structure will be both theoretical and practical, and will involve lectures, interactions, discussions and movie and documentary screenings. It will be based on an innovative and creative approach to teaching and learning that fosters lively critical discussions, and opens up possibilities of applying the learned material outside of the classroom, providing students with skills and tools for further analysis of complex issues that basically are relevant to 21st century.

The basic theme to be addressed relates to the questions: What are human rights and how do they play a role in formal and informal educational systems? And, how can we assist educators integrate a human rights discourse into school and educational curriculums and how human rights can change the future of schooling?
The course explores the notion of human rights and the educational practices of human rights, including legal instruments, the educational work of human rights organizations and activists and the ways of advocating for human rights.

We will begin with an overview of the methodologies of human right education, while covering a wide range of civil and political rights, economic and social rights, and women’s rights and their expression in educational (formal and informal) curriculums. We will explore human rights as a governing principle for dialog and as a basic principal of living together. We will focus on human rights education as a means to working towards the materialization of the cosmopolitan ideals of justice and peace. 

More specifically, this course will set a foundation of human rights education, and will explore the potential of human rights frameworks for the everyday context in and beyond schooling.

The central goal of this course is to provide the students with a basic variety of research tools, methods and approaches used in the social sciences.  The final goal of this course is to enable them to formulate research problems, select a research approach, develop and implement a research design, and review and criticize investigations executed by peers and colleagues in the wider research community.
This course offers students with foundational knowledge of qualitative and quantitative methods, elements to discern how and when they should be used, and the benefits and drawbacks of each specific method. It will develop students’ theoretical knowledge and applied skills in conducting qualitative and participatory research with ample field examples from the social and natural sciences, addressing issues, challenges and emerging trends in a globalized world.

The contemporary human rights project that began in the aftermath of World War II with the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights has seen the emergence and proliferation of several specialized mechanisms at the global and regional levels for the protection of human rights. This course seeks to provide students with a solid theoretical and practical understanding of such universal and regional human rights mechanisms. Within the universal system, this course will explore the procedures and practices of the principal organs of the United Nations, the UN Charter bodies and Treaty bodies, the role of the Human Rights Council and its special procedures, as well as the role of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights. It will also introduce students to the regional systems for protection of human rights in Europe, Africa and the Americas. It will analyze the successes, failures and challenges of these procedures using a comparative approach, by means of several case studies. It will also explore the important role of civil society organizations within each of the universal and regional mechanisms. In addition, the course will train students as human rights advocates to draft complaints before each of these bodies, in light of their respective rules, procedures, strengths, and limitations.  

This course offers a general overview of the international legal system of courts and tribunals. It provides students with a thorough understanding of the role as well as the limitations and potential of international adjudicatory bodies in international law and international relations. The coursefirst looks at the historical and political context in which international adjudication was first developed and later expanded. It then analyzes the specific position that international adjudicatory bodies hold in the global governance system. In this quest for understanding, it begins by exploringthe most salient characteristics of the International Court of Justice (ICJ), the prime example of a ‘world court’. The course will pay close attention to rules of jurisdiction and competence, as well as procedure. It will then turn to regional courts and how they have played and continue to play a role in the establishment of solid regional political identities. After this, the course will look at courts that are meant to protect the dignity and fundamental rights of individuals and considers the characteristics of human rights courts as well as international criminal courts. It will also examine economic tribunals, including the development of international claims tribunals and arbitration mechanisms for investment disputes and dispute settlement mechanisms in the context of free trade agreements, which have taken flight and are reshaping the global picture of adjudication and formal dispute settlement mechanisms. Additionally, the course will consider the role of domestic courts and the transnational dimension of domestic litigation. Finally, it will consider the implications of the growth and proliferation of international adjudication for international law as a whole.

Based on theories and experiences from diverse cultural contexts, this course will provide students with a holistic and critical understanding of the linkages between gender, sustainable development, environment, and classic economic approaches. The notion of “development” itself will be critically analysed. The inequality between women’s and men’s access to and ownership of resources, along with power differentials in decision-making will be considered. Students will then focus on a more gender inclusive, eco-feminist model for participatory action. This directs the focus to issues of environmental justice, corporate and social responsibility and ethics, while raising questions about current strategies. The course also makes visible the differential impacts of global warming , climate change and scarcity of resources given that already women are the poorest in the planet an yet they are pivotal actors for survival and change.

In a world still beset with militarized violence and multiple other forms of conflicts, a meaningful question is whether nonviolence can be an effective strategy for resolving these conflicts. This course seeks to provide a critical understanding of the growing movements and communities of people using principles, concepts and methods of nonviolence in addressing conflicts and challenging political violence/repression and economic, social and cultural injustices to build a culture of peace in diverse societies. Drawing on the ideas and philosophies of various nonviolence advocates as well as  national and local case studies, a comparison of these strategic nonviolent movements  will clarify  reasons for their success and/or failures and their possibilities and challenges in bringing about political and social transformation.  In sum, the course  seeks to provide some key conceptual and practical insights on the role of strategic nonviolent resistance in peacebuilding. 

A partir del año 1994, el sistema ONU presentó el Informe sobre Desarrollo Humano, como una respuesta a los conceptos de seguridad nacional e internacional. Este Informe acuñó el Índice de Desarrollo Humano (IDH) que facilita la medición de los índices de desarrollo frente a otras mediciones como el PBI. El enfoque entonces se fijaba principalmente en la seguridad de y entre los estados. Desde entonces el énfasis ha evolucionado a un enfoque centrado en el ser humano. Actualmente se les agregan a estos índices aquellos referidos a la seguridad alimentaria, la nutrición y la agricultura sostenible, la erradicación de la pobreza, los sistemas alimentarios, la administración medioambiental y la gestión sostenible de los recursos naturales. Así mismo, los índices relativos a la igualdad de género y a la violencia contra la mujer se han desarrollado formando parte de las metas e indicadores de las diferentes entidades de las Naciones Unidas para ayudar la comunidad internacional y a los gobiernos nacionales a recopilar información y movilizar los diferentes tipos de recursos que se necesitan para alcanzar los objetivos acordados en la Agenda de Desarrollo Post-2015. El curso provee las herramientas necesarias para comprender el tema y aplicarlo en forma práctica. Seguridad Humana una Exigencia de la Humanidad.

Every communication technology presents different benefits and challenges for the protection of the right to freedom of expression, and the Internet is not the exception to this rule. Internet-based platforms provide innumerable possibilities to seek, receive, and impart information without limitations and regardless the frontiers. Thus, a reexamination of the right to freedom of expression is required. This course will introduce students to the major themes regarding the exercise and the protection of this right in the digital era.
The first part of the course will be focused on the understanding of the current social organization, and its dependency on Internet-based platforms. This contextual framework will set the basis for the legal examination of the right to freedom of expression. For this, the course will not only deal with the identification of states obligations but also with the protection of competing rights (i.e. privacy). Finally, students will be introduced to current trends regarding the exercise of the right such as protection of journalists, dissemination of hate speech, war on terror, and the role of Internet Services Providers.

This course will cover the following topics:

  • Emotional Intelligence Explored/Defined
  • Where does EQ “show up” in the virtual world? Defining the virtual space and our communicative experiences
  • Emerging tools and strategies for developing a voice, support, and funding for your organization online
  • Strategies for organizational leadership using online tools
  • How the new information technology shift impacts our organization, its mission and message

Este curso se enfoca, esencialmente, en el impacto y las implicaciones de las relaciones de género dentro del
contexto de un conflicto armado y las subsecuentes articulaciones de las mismas relaciones en las estructuras
socio-económicas, históricas, legales y políticas de un post conflicto, incluyendo los elementos requeridos para
establecer el proceso del desarme, la desmovilización y la reintegración, en concordancia con los principios de
la construcción y el sostenimiento de la paz establecidos por las Naciones Unidas. Se examinarán conceptos
fundamentales relativos a los estereotipos de género y como estos se profundizan durante y después de un
conflicto. Se escrutarán los patrones relativos al uso de la violencia sexual como arma de guerra y como estas
agresiones han sido elevadas a la categoría de crímenes de guerra y crímenes en contra de la humanidad. Se prestará especial atención a la participación y al rol específico que juegan las mujeres en el proceso de reconstrucción y sostenimiento de la paz, en la mesa de negociaciones de la misma y en la construcción de la nueva sociedad.
Se considerará al sistema de reparaciones para aquell@s víctim@s de agresiones sexuales en conflicto tal como
establecidas por las Naciones Unidas. Mujeres, Paz y Seguridad.

Designed as an advanced workshop, this course provides a conceptual, theoretical and analytical understanding of, as well as practical skills in conflict analysis, negotiation, resolution and transformation essential in peacebuilding within and between states. Drawing on examples of complex conflicts involving nation-states, non-state groups, communities and citizens, students will examine various frameworks and tools for analyzing those conflicts, including the drivers, processes of escalation and conditions for de-escalation. The course will also provide basic knowledge, tools and skills in the vital strategy of negotiation in managing and resolving conflicts. It focuses on how the process of conducting diplomatic negotiations and other informal processes aimed at managing inter-state and intra-state conflicts have an impact on the outcomes of those conflicts, laying the foundations for outcomes ranging from stable peace to further escalation of violence. The workshop will also introduce students to various types and strategies of mediation as an important means of alternative conflict or dispute resolution. In the concluding sessions, students will examine the differences between conflict resolution and conflict transformation which focuses especially on addressing the root causes of conflicts, transforming and building long-term relationships with grassroots and community empowerment and fostering reconciliation.

The contemporary global order is founded upon the principle of sovereignty of States and non-interference in each other’s domestic affairs. At the same time, there is an ever-increasing push for 'global governance' as the key to resolving issues of common concern to humanity, especially those which are transboundary in nature. But how should global governance work in the absence of a global government? Is global governance a good thing or a bad thing for humanity and the planet anyway? Recent world events have demonstrated that while elements of global governance on issues such as climate change and forced displacement might be necessary, grassroots organizations and civil society have simultaneously pushed back against ‘too much’ global governance in other areas such as trade and finance. Should we then move towards more global governance by identifying the gaps and plugging them? Or should we rather move towards restricting global governance because it is invasive and shrinks ‘governance space’ of States? This course introduces students to the various dimensions of global governance, debates on its lack of effectiveness in some areas, as well as debates on its over-regulation in some others. The course adopts a multi-disciplinary approach to unpacking this important and emerging area of global policy making. It also adopts a dynamic pedagogy included readings, multi-media content, lectures, and discussion forums.

Over the past decades, transitional justice has emerged as an interdisciplinary field of research and practice that aims to understand and advance a complex range of goals, from strengthening democratic transitions and peacebuilding processes to enabling reconciliation.

The objective of this Course is twofold: to analyse the mechanisms and trends of transitional justice in the UN post-conflict peacebuilding processes, and to clarify some of their possible impacts on the international legal order. From an inter-disciplinary perspective, the course will briefly analise the different approaches to transitional justice along with its mechanisms including trials, truth commissions, compensation programs, apologies and commemorations. 
Similarly, the course will address the investigate normative utilised by transitional justice processes and assess its effects and efficacy of the transitional justice processes. The course will finish examining the always controversial subject of amnesty.

Establishing limits between sovereignty states and its management between neighboring countries, constitutes today an unlimited source of tensions and conflicts around the world. The course provides an historical overview of the legal methods of establishing limits and the way international community deals with these situations around the globe, including law of the sea, international rivers, lakes and the International Court of Justice and International Tribunal of the Law of the Sea jurisprudence on the area.

This course provides a basic introduction to the concept of “Security Sector Reform” (SSR) which is widely recognized as a vital component of building sustainable peace in societies in post-conflict contexts. Such reform is necessary to enhance the security and safety of people and for preventing emerging or recurring crises and conflicts. Through a critical analysis of policies, procedures, programs, activities and case studies in global, regional and local contexts, the course will clarify how Governments and intergovernmental agencies can improve the provision of security, safety and justice to citizens and institutions based on the rule of law and related standards or principles of human rights, gender equality, human security, transparency, accountability, democratic participation and good governance. Specific security sector reforms to be examined include disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) programs vital in the transition from the ending of armed conflict to a peaceful societal order; reform of various law and order and defense agencies (e.g. armed forces; police; justice, national security) and the establishment of effective civilian oversight of the security system. Emphasis will also be placed in this course on major UN policy and operational areas for supporting SSR, including peacekeeping, DDR and post-conflict peacebuilding, and the role of the United Nations Inter-Agency Security Sector Reform Task Force (IASSRTF) to “promote an integrated, holistic and coherent United Nations security sector reform (SSR) approach that envisages to assist States and societies in establishing effective, inclusive and accountable security”. The civil society-led initiative of a United Nations Emergency Peace Service (UNEPS) will also be explored in terms of its potential positive contributions to international Security Sector Reform.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a toolkit to support responsible management and decision-making in private, public, and third sector organisations of different sizes. The course offers an understanding of how different strategic and operational decisions in organisations influence the actors, practices, and structures in the spheres of business, society, and the natural environment. Lectures will focus on studying and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the contemporary management literature, including the shareholder primacy model, enlightened self-interest, institutional theory, stakeholder approach, corporate social responsibility, environmental management, corporate citizenship, public-private partnership, sustainable supply chain management, humanitarian logistics, sustainable organisation, and ecocentric organisation theory. In the course students will be working with several case studies and describing the current state of the managerial praxis, as well as evaluating the suggested implications to develop the organisational practices for sustainable development. As the main benefits, students will attain skills and knowledge that enables them to make their own judgements of what responsible management is, and what is not, in varying kinds of organisational settings.

The objective of this course is to first explore the nature of our food systems and the paradox of why, despite the apparent scientific and technological developments in agriculture enabling production of a worldwide food surplus, food insecurity is increasing globally. Secondly, students will explore what needs to change in our food systems in order to reach a goal of sustainable food security.

To achieve these two objectives, students will be encouraged to explore food security from a household and community perspective in order to understand the environmental factors that contribute to food insecurity. This knowledge-building process will be done through group tasks in the classroom and in the field. Students will be expected to undertake practical work to assess the situation of households vulnerable to food insecurity, hopefully in two locations, one urban and one rural. The course emphasizes “learning by doing” and so there will be field trips to two locations to meet vulnerable households and to assess successful local research initiatives which are increasing household and community food security.

Group work in the class will address defining food security and what constitutes a healthy sustainable food system. In addition, there will be group work, for example, in exploring the causes of famines, the issue of food justice and a right to food, the problems of food aid, and the implications of commoditization of our food systems. To bring out opposing viewpoints on food issues, part of the group work will be organized as debates. The intention of the course is to emphasise experiential learning rather than focus on formal lectures although there will be an initial presentation by the instructor on a food security topic prior to each workshop session. Hopefully, students will have gained both practical skills and theoretical knowledge about hunger, famine and food security and will feel confident and empowered to address these issues directly or indirectly in their future work.

This course provides a basic framework of international refugee law, policy and practice. The course focuses on the institutional framework of refugee protection and its relationship to the broader human rights system. The Course will be taught by a training group comprised by staff members of the United Nations High Commissioner of Refugees (UNHCR) office in San José.

In an age where a world war involving nuclear weapons could eliminate the entire human species, disarmament education is a necessary and invaluable tool for change. The purpose of this course is to raise awareness, that we live in an era of military security that takes precedence over human security. Disarmament disappeared as an element of university studies with the end of the Cold War. Education is a critically important element of sustainable peace. Disarmament education focuses on reducing, controlling, and eliminating weapons of all kinds in order to undermine militarism and prevent armed conflict and armed violence. It is a cross-cutting form of education that reinforces and learns from conflict resolution, communication, cross-cultural understanding, tolerance of diversity, non-violence, economic justice, gender equity, environmental preservation, demilitarization, development, human rights, and international humanitarian law.

As we have established in previous courses, media (in both its traditional and “new” forms) shapes our past, present, and future, and contributes in significant ways to the escalation of conflict and to practices of peace building. Here, we emphasize the gendered aspects of these processes.

In this course, we approach the media as a space for the negotiation of gendered identities, and interrogate the politics of representation from a multi-cultural and trans-disciplinary perspective. Our gender-focused analysis will address both the content of media messaging, and the wider social context of media production, activism, and advocacy. The agency of women in the media industry and the integration of gender in media NGOs will be considered in detail. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to engage with feminist critiques of media and communication studies, and to add their voices to contemporary debates on media, power, and gender.

Media is both an influential tool of socio-political and structural change, and an authoritative force for maintaining the status quo, and it is therefore essential to understand the full implications of its gendered dimensions.

La actuación de las organizaciones internacionales, tanto universales como regionales se está convirtiendo en una práctica diaria de la agenda internacional, desde los cascos azules de la ONU, los cascos verdes de la Unión Africana, hasta las misiones de observación electoral de la Unión Europea o la OEA representan un desafío político, jurídico y humanitario. La importancia del impacto diferencial para mujeres y hombres es central en el desarrollo de estas operaciones. Este curso abordará la historia, evolución y prácticas recientes de esta actuación colectiva de la comunidad internacional así como las numerosas resoluciones de las Naciones Unidas para hacer estos procesos más inclusivos y con un combate directo en contra de las diferentes formas de violencia que se manifiestan en un contexto de conflicto y post-conflicto, las violaciones masivas de derechos humanos que se producen, los diferentes crímenes que podrían cometerse en este contexto y que las operaciones de promoción de la paz tratan de contener o subsanar, entre ellos el de la violencia sexual, la violación de los derechos de niñas y niños y el reclutamiento de los niños y niñas como soldados. Manteniendo la Paz, valor fundamental para la raza humana.

This course is intended as a practical field exercise in conflict situations, as well as an academic seminar. The students will receive a basic training on how situations of stress or crisis influence them in a mental, physical, and professional ways. A series of scenarios drawn from contemporary conflict situations are presented to the participants as they simulate the work of journalists, NGO personnel and members of international organisations.

The course constitutes an advanced course dealing with central structural arrangements conducive towards war, militarism, hegemonic masculinities, Femininities, nationalism, conflict creation and resolution, greed, and competitiveness and its consequent violence, including violence against women. The impediments specifically created by lack of gender equity will be analyzed, an analysis that is seen as pivotal for peacekeeping in times of rapid globalization.

Some of the material assigned for the course offers specific strategies for empowerment and achieving gender equity, while representing the necessity for these strategies to be connected to a structural changes and a drastic shift away from the discourses concerning women with the terms “vulnerabilities” and victimization and about males as innately aggressive. It examines the complex relationships between gender, biology, race, class, ethnicity, nationalism, religion, sexual orientation, militarization, both in the domestic and the public spheres. The former is analyzed as a pillar for the latter. Global gender indicators will complement the above material.

The definitions of what constitutes human security have been shifting, specifically when analyzed from a clear gender perspective, assuming that: a) there is no clear boundary between war and peace for women worldwide; and b) security considerations go beyond that of relationships between States and focus on the human. The course will thus focus on peace building and peace education, as well as Gender analysis to Security and peace building.

The course will focus on terrorism and related forms of political violence from a comparative and global perspective. It will look at definitions, the prevalence of terrorism, techniques, the choice of targets, the effects of the media, and sources of support. The course will also look at different types of terrorist organizations including ones that are primarily seeking to attain ideological objectives, groups with an ethnic or nationalist agenda, organizations with religious motivations, and those groups with a mixture of motives that are difficult to disentangle. A portion of the course will also look at governmental support of local terrorist groups that target citizens of their own state. In addition, it will look at counterterrorism and counterinsurgency techniques, including the effects that such activities can have on civil liberties. Finally, the relative success or failure of terrorist groups in achieving their objectives will be evaluated as part of the process of determining what the future is likely to hold.

The second part of the course will be dedicated to provide a comprehensive and critical understanding of the expanding global problem of transnational organized crime which is undermining peace and human security, fueling internal and international conflicts or violence, accentuating human rights violations and impacting negatively on the political, economic, social and cultural development of societies worldwide. Students will draw on conceptual/theoretical and policy analyses, research findings and case studies from diverse regions and countries to examine various forms of transnational organized crime including the illicit arms trade, money laundering, illicit drug trafficking, theft of art and cultural objects, theft of intellectual property, piracy, cybercrime, trafficking in persons, trade in human body parts, environmental crime, organized fraud, infiltration of legal business, and graft and corruption.

Among the diverse conflicts that have led to divisions and violence in historical times and in the contemporary world, some clearly involve peoples  who belong to different religions or faiths.  Such conflicts have popularly created the assumption and conclusion that religion or faith has been or is  a primary “cause” of violence and even wars. However, on careful analysis of the dynamics and complexities of the conflicts, this perspective is now being increasingly challenged. Drawing on exemplars from diverse regions and societies, this course seeks to clarify how religious and faith identities, beliefs and practices can motivate followers to engage in violent conflicts, albeit often in intersections  with diverse economic, political and social factors.  The potential for exclusivist interpretations of religious or faith “truths” to fuel extremism, intolerances, discrimination  and even violence, including “terrorism”, will also be critically analyzed .  On the other hand, there is a widening  recognition   that religion, faith and diverse spirituality traditions can play a positive role in building a culture of peace at local, national and global levels of life. The course hence will highlight the  creative nonviolent contributions of  faiths and religions in resolving and transforming conflicts and violence . Insights and lessons from strategies such as the expanding movements of interfaith and intra-faith dialogue as well as faith-based initiatives in peacebuilding will also be explored.   The course will be especially relevant to peacebuilders working in contexts of cultural and faith or religious  complexities and diversities. 

En formato de seminario, el programa revisará la agenda internacional global, presentando de forma actual los
principales desafíos a la paz y la seguridad internacional. Este análisis se centrará en el estudio de los casos
que han sido resueltos por los diferentes tribunales internacionales. Después de una breve introducción a esta
jurisprudencia, los estudiantes podrán escoger – para profundizar posteriormente – entre casos decididos por
la Corte Penal Internacional, la Corte Europea de Derechos Humanos, la Corte Interamericana de Derechos
Humanos y los Tribunales de Ruanda y Yugoeslavia. Retos para la Paz en la Problemática Contemporánea.

The UPEACE Model United Nations Conference (UPMUNC) is a graduate-level simulation of the real United Nations Organization, its most important specialized agencies, and other associated organizations. UPMUNC provides a common platform for UPEACE students and participants from several other universities to discuss international affairs and to gain a greater understanding of the procedures of the United Nations. Participants become familiar with key global issues by becoming part of the international decision making process to resolve them, and in so doing, are given an opportunity to apply their skills in negotiations, public speaking, and diplomacy.

International economic relations between states, in the post WWII period, have increasingly become subject to a diverse range of bilateral, plurilateral and multilateral treaty and institutional arrangements. These include not only transnational trade and investment rules, but also rules for finance and development. In the face of such proliferation of international economic treaties and institutions, it is imperative that dispute settlement mechanisms be robust and effective, lest unresolved disputes lead to the same circumstances that contributed to the emergence of WWII. The main objective of this course is to explore the international legal dimensions of contemporary transnational economic relations, with the specific objective of understanding how dispute settlement mechanisms within the discipline work. The course will adopt a trans-disciplinary approach which encompasses not only international law, but also the fields of economics and finance, development studies, human rights and intellectual property rights. Students will look closely at the economic and legal principles of the multilateral trade system, the case for the liberalization of trade, the exceptions to the principles of liberalization, the judicial mechanisms that have been established to facilitate the settlement of trade disputes, and current initiatives for making trade work for development. Similarly, students will also look at the law governing bilateral and regional free trade and investment agreements and the legal debates emerging from the ‘spaghetti bowl’ of criss-crossing trade agreements. Finally, the course will also analyze the international legal dimensions of the Bretton Woods Institutions related to finance and development.

This course introduces students to the practical tools and techniques required by field-based human rights practitioners, whether working with the United Nations, other inter-governmental organizations, governments, or NGOs. Students will gain the necessary skills required in human rights reporting, monitoring and evaluation by using Human Rights Based Approaches (HRBA) – a conceptual framework which focuses on integrating the norms, standards and principles of the international human rights system into the plans, policies and processes of human rights field work. Techniques for information gathering or ‘fact-finding’, and mainstreaming HRBA in analyzing and reporting will be introduced to the students. Students will also learn about the strategic uses of reporting in a range of formal and informal settings, including in human rights advocacy, naming and shaming, policy making, and monitoring situations. Special attention is given to human rights based programming, as well as the tools for monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of interventions or projects aimed at protecting or promoting human rights. The course is hands-on and will be based on a number of practical exercises.

Contemporary gendered trafficking in persons for sexual exploitation and force labour, has been radically increasing and has become of the mayor economic enterprises worldwide. This course will focus on the structural factors interacting with gender inequality, such as other discriminatory practices, poverty, globalization, demand for prostitutes and sex tourism focusing on children, and the related issues of internally displaced individuals, migration and refugees. Women and children are highly represented among these populations. Additionally, proximate factors such as corruption, impunity, increased technological advances, lack of political will contribute to the understanding of sources  of this growing exploitation of vulnerable individuals. The course will also include a focus on international and national efforts to prevent, protect and punish human trafficking and manners in which to assess the effectiveness of these measures, as well as to   consider future challenges.

The course seeks to provide  a comprehensive and critical understanding of the expanding global problem of transnational organized crime which is undermining peace and human security, fuelling internal and international conflicts or violence, accentuating human rights violations and impacting negatively on the political, economic, social and cultural development of societies worldwide. Students will draw on conceptual/ theoretical and policy analyses, research findings and case studies from diverse regions and countries to examine various forms of transnational organized crime including the illicit arms trade, money laundering, illicit drug trafficking , theft of art and cultural objects, theft of intellectual property, piracy, cyber crime, trafficking in persons, trade in human body parts, environmental crime, intellectual property theft, organized fraud, infiltration of legal business, and graft and corruption.  The course will highlight the negative impact of transnational organized crime on state institutions and good governance (e.g., political, health, social, legal, justice, commercial and financial systems) and on  legal and social norms. Students will also examine recent initiatives by governments and international organizations, in particular the United Nations, to address and overcome such transnational organized criminality, such as notably the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its related protocols on Trafficking in Persons, Smuggling of Migrants and Trafficking of Firearms.

This class is an opportunity to explore in-depth how different land-uses and conservation approaches intermingle in one particular region: the South of Costa Rica.  The purpose of the field trip is to obtain critical direct experience and knowledge of important natural resources management issues in a developing country, given the real political, economic and ecological context of the same. This course enables students to assess the contextual factors that affect natural resource management. Over the course of the trip, we will visit and be exposed to projects and issues with various resources, different actors involved in the management and different institutional settings.

This course introduces and explores the critically important notion of sustainability and the implications that the sustainable development agenda has for education, learning and social change. Sustainability embraces ecological mindfulness, competence, equity, social justice (intragenerational and  inter-generational), peaceful relationships and action for transformation. The aim of the course is to develop a sound understanding and appreciation of the scope and complexity of sustainability issues and their significance; an understanding of the role of education, and of the kinds of learning and education needed to help realize a safer and more liveable future at local, national and international scales; and to encourage a personal engaged response to these issues.  Key themes include: the concept of sustainable development (SD); responses to sustainability at personal, organisational, and community level including barriers and drivers; the role of worldviews and perception in relation to addressing sustainability issues; ecological perspectives and Gaian thinking; systems thinking and sustainability intelligence; exploring futures scenarios; re-thinking education for our times; transformative learning and sustainability pedagogy; sustainability literacy; the role of the Earth Charter; the transition movement, resilience, design and strategy for change.

In the last decades of the XX century, within the context of globalization, the need to look at new economic paradigms more in line with sustainable development became evident and notorious.

The triple bottom line approach is becoming the common language in every organization and the social pressure on both corporations, as well as governmental actors, civil society organization in providing ecofriendly goods and services, complying with International standards and codes of conduct as well as respecting and advocating for human rights, is rising day by day. 

Therefore there is a urgent need to reflect on the current practices and trends in responding to the world most urgent demands and at the same time challenge the most renowned models and framework to attempt looking beyond corporate social responsibilities approach as analyzing the social responsibilities of all stakeholders and promote a common understanding and synergy of actions which lead to the building of a new society which is more respectful and responsible in responding to needs and priorities of all citizens. 

The course will lead the students towards a critical review of the current approaches to CSR and looking beyond it to analyze the society as a whole, as per each actor involved.  

This is because it is the author’s belief that all stakeholders are equally responsible of market failure, for un respectful behaviors towards the environment and the society, and there is a collective need to look for answers and align policies and strategies to achieve common goals for the benefit of all. 

The course will be an interactive course built on theories and practical experiences of students, guest speakers and the instructor.

This course will cover the following topics:

  • What problem is your organization addressing, and how?
  • How can you implement a program to help you measure the impact and outputs that your organization is generating?  What tools should you be using to do so?
  • How can you institutionalize the monitoring of your organization, and use the information gathered to influence your planning, decision-making and communications in the future?

El curso familiariza a los estudiantes con las herramientas prácticas para la investigación, junto con las metodologías para la elaboración de análisis sociales, de derechos humanos y jurídicos. De esta manera el curso no se limita tan solo a las herramientas de negociación, sino que además proveerá a l@s participantes con las técnicas para convertir estas negociaciones en elementos de políticas que pueden ser elaboradas, presentadas y difundidas para su validación. Además, los estudiantes también serán introducidos a las distintas bases de datos disponibles en línea y a los sistemas físicos y la e-biblioteca de la UPAZ; de esta forma podrán desarrollar de forma articulada la propuesta de investigación, para la tesis o para preparar la propuesta de trabajo para la pasantía de grado.

The course aims to develop knowledge of the religious, social, cultural and political roots of terrorism in the Muslim context, providing balanced frameworks that may lead to peaceful transformation.

The course does not start with a simplistic assumption that “religion has been the cause of all conflicts”.  Instead, the course studies critically the role of religion (along with other factors, such as nationalism, ethnicity, race, class, gender, among others) in contributing to conflict causes, influencing its persisting negative and destructive dynamics,  and in peacefully resolving and transforming conflicts.  

The course will be studied from the vantage point of the field of peace and conflict studies, using frameworks and models intended to deeply analyze several case studies from different parts of the world.  The course materials and activities will culminate in an exploration of methods and processes that would advance the positive peaceful role of religion and religious institutions in various types and levels of conflicts, and which are suitable for the realities of the 21st century.

The course will target a wide range of participants, including graduate students of The University for Peace and professionals interested in the topic of religion, conflict and peace.

The course aims at understanding the impact of climate change on the global environment and on human activity.  Climate change increases risks to human livelihoods and as such may endanger the security of individuals and groups. This in turn could increase the propensity for conflict within and between states.
Components of the course will include a critical examination of the drivers of climate change, largely induced by human activity, and a review of international efforts to limit the magnitude of climate changes, including those concluded in Kyoto and Copenhagen. Consequences of climate change for human health, for economic activity, for resource use and resource availability will also be examined, as will be the options for adapting to climate change.
The examination of climate changes will be viewed within the broader context of the current demographic, economic and political global reality.   Introductory comments and discussions led by the instructor will be followed by seminars with broad student input.

The 20th and 21st centuries have been described as the age of globalization, a phenomenon which is increasingly affecting human beings in every aspect of our lives. While globalization has undoubtedly resulted in significant economic and social integration at the global level, it has also brought with it unintended consequences for the respect and promotion of human rights. The principal institutions facilitating this phenomenon, such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization (WTO), have often been accused of keeping human rights issues out of their respective domains. Corporations also have been accused of undermining human rights, and at times even of being complicit in their violation. An important feature of globalization is its nexus with development policies, including the MDGs/SDGs and development aid, often with regressive effects. The critical challenge facing the present world order, therefore, lies in ensuring that the vehicles of globalization are oriented towards the development and promotion of human rights, through appropriate laws and policies. This course will introduce students to the major themes and debates concerning the linkages between globalization and human rights and explore the new streams of critique that have enabled a confluence as well as a questioning of the globalization-human rights interface.

The geographical integrity of sovereign states is at the core of the contemporary notion of statehood itself. Therefore, when it comes to the specific delimitation of national territories, or the management of specific trans-boundary situations, there are a wealth of large and small maritime and territorial disputes. This course provides a historical overview of how international law has established the boundaries and limits of state jurisdiction, and the ways in which the international community has responded to territorial and maritime disputes around the globe. Close attention shall be given to a key player in this history: the International Court of Justice (ICJ). Additionally, this course will provide an elaborate treatment of the law of the sea and its court, the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (ITLOS). This part of international law regulates the activities of states and persons at sea as well as maritime boundaries. Its rules are to a large extent laid down in the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. The Convention, which has properly been called the “Constitution for the Oceans,” can be regarded as one of the major accomplishments of the United Nations, in that it deals in a comprehensive manner with all aspects of the uses of the seas, which cover over 70% of the world’s surface.

This course will the complexity of genders, ethnicities races, sexual orientations, religions and their intersectionlity in contemporary peace keeping and peace building work. The course aims to deal with practical and theoretical aspects of identity and its effect on peace building and keeping in the field of conflict transformation and prevention. While notions of Hegemonic masculinies and feminities are questioning what constitute gender vs sex. The course will explore contemporary concepts that attempt to bridge conflicting identities and politicize the process of identity fluidity and development.

This course seeks to clarify the range of purposes that education can and should fulfil before, during and after wars and other emergency situations as part of a humanitarian response and the transformative process of building a culture of peace.

The course focuses on (1) on the different educational challenges in various emergency contexts, (2) on participatory teaching-learning methodologies applicable in such contexts, and (3) on carefully designing education projects in relation to its impact on target groups and society at large.

Central to the course are examples from various conflicts, natural disasters and health crises. The examples show possibilities for formal and non-formal educational strategies and pedagogical methods for helping different kinds of vulnerable groups, the preventive role of education in improving survival and health prospects during or prior to emergencies. The examples are also used to show the conceptual insights, practices and guidelines on which international and local humanitarian agencies and civil society organizations base their work.

The course will be relevant to peace educators and peacebuilders, who want to contribute to educational initiatives and programs designed to meet the needs and enhance the well-being of peoples affected by situations of armed conflicts and other emergencies, whether natural or human–made.

The worlds of ‘working for the betterment of society’ and ‘private enterprise’ are often seen as incompatible. This course will attempt to breakdown that perception in order for participants to see the social sector as a place of opportunity, both to ‘do good’ but also to innovate and build a financially sustainable social enterprise, whether non-profit, for-profit, or some combination of the two. The course suggests that in order to get a socially beneficial idea off the ground, effectively grow it, and make it financially sustainable, social entrepreneurs need to think creatively beyond models of traditional non profits or for-profits. 

This hands-on and dynamic course will expose participants to a number of cases of social entrepreneurs who have converted their desire of building a better world into a reality. The course will include a field-based case where participants will experience first hand a social enterprise in Costa Rica. The course hopes to inspire participants with an entrepreneurial spirit, help gain an understanding of the challenges of the start-up process, and think about the complexities of growing and managing it.

The course will focus on terrorism and related forms of political violence from a comparative and global perspective.  It will look at definitions, the prevalence of terrorism, techniques, the choice of targets, the effects of the media, and sources of support.  The course will also look at different types of terrorist organizations including ones that are primarily seeking to attain ideological objectives, groups with an ethnic or nationalist agenda, organizations with religious motivations, and those groups with a mixture of motives that are difficult to disentangle.  A portion of the course will also look at governmental support of local terrorist groups that target citizens of their own state.  In addition, it will look at counterterrorism and counterinsurgency techniques, including the effects that such activities can have on civil liberties. Finally, the relative success or failure of terrorist groups in achieving their objectives will be evaluated as part of the process of determining what the future is likely to hold.

This course will cover the following topics:

  • In our fast-changing world, what knowledge, values, skills will be critical for the ‘success’ of your learners?
  • How can we help develop innovative mindsets, both for ourselves and our learners, using the breakthrough approaches of design thinking?
  • How can we help contribute to increasing the well-being of our learners in a culture of over-achievement?
  • Given our globalizing world, what does it mean to be a ‘global citizen’ and contribute to building a more sustainable, just, and equitable world?

The Hybrid Diploma in Social Innovation is awarded upon completing 5 of the UPEACE Centre’s courses within a period of 18 months, including one onsite professional development workshop.  You will begin the program in Costa Rica from June 5-7, 2017 for the Positive Leadership seminar. Also required is the online course ‘Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Social Change.’ 

In addition to these courses, you may choose 3 more from the following options:

  • Skills for Effective Negotiations
  • Designing Your Life: Innovating From the Inside Out
  • Educating in Changing Times: Reflect, Rethink, Rebuild
  • Mission Impossible: Measuring Outcomes & Impact
  • Social Media for Social Innovation
  • Regenerative Leadership

These courses are offered several times during the year, so make sure to check our list of courses and their upcoming dates.  In order to enroll in these courses, just send us your choice of courses, so we can reserve your space. 

Please note that travel expenses to and in Costa Rica for the Positive Leadership workshop are not included in the Hybrid Diploma cost of $2,395.

This course will cover the following themes:

  • Integral Leadership
  • Appreciative Inquiry
  • Self-Evaluation and energy audit
  • Conflict Style and Resolution
  • Practicing Innovative Thinking
  • Getting Things Done

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to global politics, focusing in particular on its origins and historical evolution, its key concepts, major theoretical frameworks, main actors and institutions, the global architecture of power, and its dynamic nature in the process of globalization. More specifically, the course introduces concepts of power, statecraft, diplomacy, foreign policy, political economy and international security, and examines the evolution of global politics in the 20th and 21st centuries. The course combines the study of concepts and theories with a range of questions about global politics, such as: Why bother with theory? Why is the world divided in nation-states? How do institutions modify interests and interactions? Is the nation-state in decline? Why do wars occur? What are the causes of terrorism? What are the main global threats of the 21st century? Why war? What is the role of the United Nations in resolving conflict? These and other central questions about the nature of global political relations are examined in this course.

The Graduation Project is a concluding academic requirement intended to be a comprehensive and capstone outcome of the student educational performance. It is a higher academic exercise that enables the student to demonstrate the ability to identify a problem, determine an academic objective to address it and utilize an appropriate methodology to attain such objective. The Graduation Project is also intended to demonstrate the student’s ability to write and critically develop a professional and scholarly report. 

The Graduation Project can be fulfilled through one of the following modalities:

•Thesis:  8 credits
•Internship: 8 credits (3 months)
•Capstone: 5 credits*

Graduation Project Guidelines with detail information of each modality will be provided by your Academic Department.

*NOTE: Students who choose Capstone as Graduation Project must take an extra 3-credit course according the following options:
1.One additional course (face to face modality), which means taking 2 parallel regular master courses (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) if approved by the student's MA Programme Coordinator
2.One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality), which means taking 2 or 3 parallel courses (one face-to-face master course and one 3 credit course or two 2-credit courses approved by the student's Programme Coordinator) before June 2016
3.One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality) extended from June 2016 until December 2016 (the online course or courses must be approved by the student's Programme Coordinator)

This course introduces participants to the international law dimensions of peace and conflicts. It explores the international legal standards, both in treaty law and in customary international law, that underpin the prevention, management and resolution of inter-state and intra-state conflicts. The course adopts a diverse range of approaches to examine the rules, procedures, successes and failures of key international organizations, including the United Nations, as well as regional organizations, in responding to peace and conflict situations. Several case studies of actual policy responses, or lack thereof, will be explored in the course. Participants will also learn about the limits that international law places on States and non-state actors in peace and conflict situations, before moving into a critical discussion on the debates surrounding lack of enforcement of those standards in international law. Finally, the course will explore how international law intersects with other areas of inquiry related to peace and conflict studies, in order to promote multi-pronged responses to peace and conflict situations.

The Graduation Project is a concluding academic requirement intended to be a comprehensive and capstone outcome of the student educational performance. It is a higher academic exercise that enables the student to demonstrate the ability to identify a problem, determine an academic objective to address it and utilize an appropriate methodology to attain such objective. The Graduation Project is also intended to demonstrate the student’s ability to write and critically develop a professional and scholarly report.  The Graduation Project can be fulfilled through one of the following modalities:

  • Thesis:  8 credits
  • Internship: 8 credits (3 months)
  • Capstone: 5 credits*

Graduation Project Guidelines with detail information of each modality will be provided by your Academic Department.

*NOTE: Students who choose Capstone as Graduation Project must take an extra 3-credit course according the following options:

  1. One additional course (face to face modality), which means taking 2 parallel regular master courses (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) if approved by the student's MA Programme Coordinator
  2. One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality), which means taking 2 or 3 parallel courses (one face-to-face master course and one 3 credit course or two 2-credit courses approved by the student's Programme Coordinator) before June 2017
  3. One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality) extended from June 2017 until December 2017 (the online course or courses must be approved by the student's Programme Coordinator)

The Graduation Project is a concluding academic requirement intended to be a comprehensive and capstone outcome of the student educational performance. It is a higher academic exercise that enables the student to demonstrate the ability to identify a problem, determine an academic objective to address it and utilize an appropriate methodology to attain such objective. The Graduation Project is also intended to demonstrate the student’s ability to write and critically develop a professional and scholarly report.  The Graduation Project can be fulfilled through one of the following modalities:

  • Thesis:  8 credits
  • Internship: 8 credits (3 months)
  • Capstone: 5 credits*

Graduation Project Guidelines with detail information of each modality will be provided by your Academic Department.

*NOTE: Students who choose Capstone as Graduation Project must take an extra 3-credit course according the following options:

  1. One additional course (face to face modality), which means taking 2 parallel regular master courses (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) if approved by the student's MA Programme Coordinator
  2. One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality), which means taking 2 or 3 parallel courses (one face-to-face master course and one 3 credit course or two 2-credit courses approved by the student's Programme Coordinator) before June 2017
  3. One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality) extended from June 2017 until December 2017 (the online course or courses must be approved by the student's Programme Coordinator)

The Graduation Project is a concluding academic requirement intended to be a comprehensive and capstone outcome of the student educational performance. It is a higher academic exercise that enables the student to demonstrate the ability to identify a problem, determine an academic objective to address it and utilize an appropriate methodology to attain such objective. The Graduation Project is also intended to demonstrate the student’s ability to write and critically develop a professional and scholarly report.  The Graduation Project can be fulfilled through one of the following modalities:

  • Thesis:  8 credits
  • Internship: 8 credits (3 months)
  • Capstone: 5 credits*

Graduation Project Guidelines with detail information of each modality will be provided by your Academic Department.

*NOTE: Students who choose Capstone as Graduation Project must take an extra 3-credit course according the following options:

  1. One additional course (face to face modality), which means taking 2 parallel regular master courses (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) if approved by the student's MA Programme Coordinator
  2. One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality), which means taking 2 or 3 parallel courses (one face-to-face master course and one 3 credit course or two 2-credit courses approved by the student's Programme Coordinator) before June 2017
  3. One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality) extended from June 2017until December 2017

The Graduation Project is a concluding academic requirement intended to be a comprehensive and capstone outcome of the student educational performance. It is a higher academic exercise that enables the student to demonstrate the ability to identify a problem, determine an academic objective to address it and utilize an appropriate methodology to attain such objective. The Graduation Project is also intended to demonstrate the student’s ability to write and critically develop a professional and scholarly report.  The Graduation Project can be fulfilled through one of the following modalities:

  • Thesis:  8 credits
  • Internship: 8 credits (3 months)
  • Capstone: 5 credits*

Graduation Project Guidelines with detail information of each modality will be provided by your Academic Department.

*NOTE: Students who choose Capstone as Graduation Project must take an extra 3-credit course according the following options:

  1. One additional course (face to face modality), which means taking 2 parallel regular master courses (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) if approved by the student's MA Programme Coordinator
  2. One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality), which means taking 2 or 3 parallel courses (one face-to-face master course and one 3 credit course or two 2-credit courses approved by the student's Programme Coordinator) before June 2016
  3. One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality) extended from June 2016 until December 2016 (the online course or courses must be approved by the student's Programme Coordinator)

El Trabajo Final de Graduación - Tesis - se pretende alcanzar con la concentración en el segundo semestre, bajo la supervisión de un asesor ya sea en residencia en la Universidad o según lo determine el Departamento. La Facultad del Departamento coordinará el proceso de tutoría-investigación y escritura de los estudiantes, para ayudar a los estudiantes en la producción de una obra de calidad y perspicacia. Aunque la Facultad estará involucrada en cada etapa de la preparación del documento, se insiste en que los alumnos deben trabajar por su cuenta.

El aprendizaje, por experiencia, ayuda a los estudiantes a desarrollar estrategias creativas para la aplicación y práctica de su educación. Se ofrece a los estudiantes la oportunidad de concentrar la atención y sentido a su experiencia. Las prácticas académicas proporcionan experiencias sin precedentes para que los estudiantes, que toman los conocimientos y habilidades de pensamiento crítico que están aprendiendo en el aula y las aplican en un entorno profesional. Además, proporciona una excelente oportunidad para que el estudiante crea una red social con eventuales colegas en sus respectivas áreas de interés o profesión.

El modelo preferido de la educación experimental se basa en la filosofía de "educación cooperativa", reconociendo el papel respectivo de los estudiantes, universidades y organizaciones de acogida que trabajan juntos para permitir a los estudiantes a explorar sus metas profesionales. En el ámbito del derecho internacional, en particular, una experiencia de primera mano en el trabajo de organización es un complemento perfecto para los cursos académicos durante el programa de maestría.

El periodo de prácticas es una actividad académica y puede ser llevada a cabo por los estudiantes en lugar de una tesis. A la finalización con éxito de las prácticas en términos de los requisitos, con un valor de 8 créditos académicos, contando de esta manera con los requisitos de graduación finales de la misma manera que una tesis.

One of the most important tasks of the media is to inform. Objectivity, neutrality and truth are three of the core terms of reference for this task, but in respective to conflicts this is not that easy. How is objectivity possible when it comes to crimes? How can one stay neutral when people suffer?
It is quite easy to state that the media are not neutral enough, and that they take sides and manipulate. Indeed, journalists are not necessarily immune towards propaganda – and yet, it would be short sided to see only this side of war journalism. There is much more to detect than only that. In Peace Journalism reporters are invited to take sides, to write in favour of Human Rights and to look for other perspectives than the usual negative ones. Thus, also Peace Journalism has its clear ethical rules.
During this course we will look at different forms of journalism in conflict situations. Ethical frameworks will give us an idea of the regulations that reporters have to deal with. At the same time this is only one part of the reality. Journalists in war situations and political conflicts are in constant danger. The space for the freedom of expression seems to diminish constantly. How is it possible to work under these circumstances?
Another challenge is the lack of money that the majority of the international media outlets have to deal with, which results in less and less official war correspondents. For journalists this means to work on a freelance basis and be less protected but freer at the same time. What does this mean for the daily work?
This course will give us a glance into a world that is often described in a far too romantic or adventurous way. We will look at examples of text, photography and videos, from mainstream media to bloggers and grassroot journalism, which we will try to analyse from diverse sides, bearing in mind that journalism finally is mostly this: a modern form of storytelling.

Empowering Transformation: Strategies, Methods and Tools for Effective Capacity Building
This theoretical and practice online course is for people actively engaged in peacebuilding projects, community, national and international organizations and social movements.
Developed for peace workers, practitioners and activists, teachers engaged in community and social work, national and local people’s movements and struggles, and working to transcend direct forms of violence, inequality, social and community conflicts, gender discrimination, human rights violations, and social, economic and political repression. The course aims to teach how to build capacity and to work together with and train participants in concrete skills, tools and methods for social action and transformation, building social movements and empowering organizations and communities.
The online course will examine strategies and lessons that can be learned from successful community interventions and social movements and people’s struggles, grass-roots and global movements. Participants will analyses and learn wide-range of social, political, economic, cultural and other point of views to community project development.

Conflict analysis is the systematic study of the profile, causes, actors, and dynamics of conflict. It helps development, humanitarian and peacebuilding practitioners to gain a better understanding of the context in which they work and their role in that context. This course presents an introduction to the subject of conflict analysis, illustrating analytical tools used, with reference multitude case studies to understand the dynamics of conflict. This course examines theoretical and practical frameworks for understanding conflict, with particular attention to structures and dynamics inhibiting peace. The course provides participants with some of the analytical skills needed to understand how conflicts develop and escalate, to identify factors that can lead to or sustain violence, and to map root causes of conflict (e.g., human rights violations, needs deprivation, cultural and religious differences, inequality, resource misuse and environmental degradation) at interpersonal, intergroup, and international levels.

The 21st century is described as the age of globalization, a phenomenon which is increasingly affecting human beings in every aspect of their lives. While globalization has undoubtedly resulted in significant economic and social integration at the global level, the pace at which it is occurring has also brought with it several unintended consequences for the respect and promotion of human rights at other levels. The principal institutions facilitating this phenomenon such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, the World Trade Organization and business corporations, have often been accused of keeping human rights issues out of their respective domains. The critical challenge, therefore, facing the present world order lies in ensuring that the vehicles of globalization are oriented towards development and promotion of human rights, through appropriate laws and policies. This course will introduce students to the major themes and debates concerning these different linkages between globalization and human rights and explore the new streams of critique that have enabled a confluence as well as a questioning of the globalization-human rights interface. The course will begin with a critique of the traditional understanding of ‘development as economic growth’ using scholarship from both economists and human rights practitioners. With this foundation, the course will critically examine the contemporary issues in our globalized world and their nexus with human rights, by focusing on topics such as the MDGs, development aid, international trade, investment, international financial institutions, intellectual property rights and businesses.

This course will introduce students to the relations between the environment, development, and peace and conflict. We will discuss the concepts of Global Environmental Change, Sustainable Development, Green Economy, and Environmental Security. We will draw on the examples of Climate Change and Deforestation, as two of the main environmental challenges the world is facing. We will analyze the different approaches to development inside the sustainable development discourse, and link it to the emerging Green Economy discourse arising in addressing Global Environmental Change and Poverty reduction. These themes will be explained and critically analyzed.

A second theme of this course is Environmental Security. We will discuss and analyze this field emphasizing on its complexity and some underlying neo-Malthusian ideas that still prevail in much of this literature. Specifically, we will look at the linkages between natural resources and conflicts focusing not only on environmental scarcities, but also on the resource curse and resource abundance approaches to so-called “environmental conflicts”. Similarly, we will discuss the role of the environment and of natural resources for sustainable peace, and how natural resources can or could be used in initiating a peace process.

Finally, the students will examine the Rwanda genocide and the different approaches used to analyze and explain this conflict. This case study will serve to bring all the concepts of this course together and to draw general conclusions.

This course offers a deeper understanding of the change processes that lead to more effective projects and impacts within organizations. It is intended to increase the students’ capacities to formulate strategies and to design, implement and evaluate projects within a development and conflict prevention perspective. The students learn and critically discuss the theories of change as well as the processes of strategic planning, and project design and evaluation. They apply these notions to the study of concrete cases and to the preparation of their own strategic development and projects. The course delves deeper on such tools as: all the steps leading to the formulation of strategic plans; context, problem and stakeholders’ analysis; project cycle; logical framework; outcome mapping; adaptive management; project implementation; phasing out; project monitoring and impact assessment.



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FACULTY

Adriana Salcedo is an anthropologist focusing on conflict analysis, identity, migration and peacebuilding. She holds a Doctorate in Conflict Analysis and Resolution from George Mason University, in Virginia, United States, for which she conducted extensive research on forced migration, human rights and conflict in the Colombian-Ecuadorian borderlands and inner cities in Ecuador. With more than twelve years of experience in the analyzing social conflicts, her professional practice covers the Amazon basin, the Galapagos Islands and the Andean region (Ecuador, Colombia and Bolivia), the United States and the Dominican Republic. She has researched for and worked with various public, private and civil society institutions, including international organizations, NGOs, etc., as well as grass-roots organizations, including indigenous communities, women and minority groups (e.g. LGBT organizations). In the academic field, she has taught courses at the Simón Bolívar Andean University, at the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO) in Quito, Ecuador and at George Mason University in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area on conflict analysis, participatory methodologies for building peace, and human rights and conflict. She has several publications in indexed books and journals in English and Spanish, exploring issues of human displacement, conflict, migrant s’ rights and their link to public policies. Additionally, she has conducted numerous training courses and seminars for the Northern Virginia Mediation Center (as a Certified Instructor/Mediator), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the Ministry of Education of the Dominican Republic (DR) and the Canadian Embassy in the DR. She is fluent in English and Spanish, and possesses a good command of Portuguese, French and Quichua. She has traveled extensively in the Latin America and the Caribbean region, as well as in North America, Asia and Europe.
Alonso Muñoz is Instructor in the Department of Environment and Development at the University for Peace, where he coordinates the Master of Arts (MA) degree in Responsible Management and Sustainable Economic Development (RMSED). He holds a BSc. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Costa Rica and a Msc. in Business Administration. He has worked in the private sector as a consultant and as an entrepreneur, and has volunteered on various national and international projects regarding peace education, migration, environmental impact of systems and Social Enterprises. He is a novelist, a blogger, a peace advocate, an entrepreneur and passionate about social and environmental development.
Alvaro Sierra has been a journalist for more than 25 years and has worked for the past years as a senior editor and editorial adviser of the daily El Tiempo, Bogota. He was president of the board of Medios para la Paz (Media for Peace), a major Colombian NGO of journalists that designs and teaches courses and seminars for journalists working in conditions of armed conflict. For the past eight years he has designed courses and trained local journalists in Colombia, and also in Haiti, Mexico and Ecuador. He teaches for the Knight Center of Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin courses on conflict coverage and on coverage of the drug business. He has extensive experience covering armed conflicts both as a local reporter and a foreign correspondent. In the past 20 years he has worked in Nicaragua, the former Soviet Union, Russia, the Baltic States, Ukraine, Central Asia, the Caucasus, China, Hong Kong and Colombia, among other places. He’s fluent in Spanish, French, Russian and English. From 2008 and 2010 he was Associate Professor at UPEACE, in charge of the MA on Media, Peace and Conflict Studies. Since January 2011 he’s back in Colombia, where he works as chief editor at Semana, the main newsweekly in the country.
Dr. Abdalla is the Senior Advisor on Policy Analysis and Research at the Institute for Peace and Security Studies (IPSS) of Addis Ababa University, and the Senior Advisor on Conflict Resolution at KARAMAH (Muslim Women Lawyers for Human Rights). In 2013-2014, he was Vice President of SALAM Institute for Peace and Justice in Washington, D.C. From 2004-2013 he was Professor, Dean and Vice Rector at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace (UPEACE) in Costa Rica. Prior to that, he was a Senior Fellow with the Peace Operations Policy Program, School of Public Policy, at George Mason University, Virginia. He was also a Professor of Conflict Analysis and Resolution at the Graduate School of Islamic and Social Sciences in Leesburg, Virginia. He practiced law as a prosecuting attorney from 1978 to 1987 in Egypt. He then emigrated to the U.S. where he obtained a Master's degree in Sociology and a Ph.D. in Conflict Analysis and Resolution from George Mason University. He has been teaching graduate classes in conflict analysis and resolution, and has conducted training, research and evaluation of conflict resolution and peacebuilding programs in several countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. He teaches regularly (face-to-face and online) at American University in Washington, D.C., University for Peace, University of Addis Ababa, and Open University of Catalonia. Dr. Abdalla pioneered the development of the first conflict resolution training manual for the Muslim communities in the United States titled (“…Say Peace”). He also founded Project LIGHT (Learning Islamic Guidance for Human Tolerance), a community peer-based anti-discrimination project funded by the National Conference for Community and Justice (NCCJ). In 2011, he established with Egyptian UPEACE graduates a program for community prevention of sectarian violence in Egypt (Ahl el Hetta).
Recientemente nombrada como Representante Permanente en la nueva Oficina de Enlace ante Austria y Naciones Unidas, Ana Teresa Dengo cuenta con amplia experiencia internacional tanto en el sector público como privado. Más de tres décadas trabajando en temas de desarrollo internacional, desarme y no proliferacion nuclear. Sus principals areas de expertise incluyen diplomacia y Negociación, Gerencia y Planeamiento estratégico, Capacitación y entrenamiento y Liderazgo y conducción de equipos. Durante ocho años ocupó el puesto de Embajadora de Costa Rica ante Austria, Bosnia y Herzegovina, Eslovaquia, Eslovenia, Croacia, Montenegro y Serbia, asi como Representante Permanente ante el Organismo de Energia Atomica (OEIA), la Organización para la Prohibicion Completa de los Ensayos Nucleares (OTPCE), la Organización de Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo Industrial (ONUDI) y la Oficina de Naciones Unidas en Viena (UNOV). Anteriormente, tuvo los cargos de oficial de relaciones externas y luego de cooperacion internacional en la Comisión Preparatoria para el Tratado de Prohibición Completa de los Ensayos Nucleares, Viena, Austria. Estuvo destacada en la Misión de Costa Rica ante la Organización de Estados Americanos y luego paso a ser consultora del Fondo de las Américas en dicha organización. Durante la Presidencia de Costa Rica del G-77 y China, Grupo de 77 y China, Naciones Unidas, New York, fue llamada como negociadora y asesora del Presidente en temas económicos. Anteriormente, trabajo como consultora en el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo y de Agricultural Cooperative Development International (ACDI) en Washington, DC. Fue Directora Asociada y Gerente del Programa de Pequena Empresa del Cuerpo de Paz en Costa Rica, puesto que dejo para obtener su Maestria en Administracion Publica en la Universidad de Harvard, en Estados Unidos. Domina el inglés y el español y tiene bastante conocimiento del alemán.

André Nijhof (1969) has a masters degree in Business Administration from the University of Twente. He started his working life as a researcher of organisational change in multinational companies like Akzo Nobel, Asito, Shell Pernis, Stegeman Sara Lee and Vredestein. Based on his research he finished his PhD at the University of Twente just before the turn of the century (1999). Next he became a senior consultant at Q-Consult, where he specialized in corporate social responsibility and the implementation of management systems. Andre is former chairman of the Dutch Network on Business Ethics. Since 2007 he has been associate professor at the European Institute for Business Ethics, part of Nyenrode Business Universiteit.

Arlinda Rrustemi born in Pristina, Kosovo. She is a researcher and lecturer at Leiden University and she also assists in the Global Affairs minor. She was a research assistant to Prof. Jaap de Hoop Scheffer. She was involved in courses taught at the Advanced LL.M. programme in Public International Law and at Leiden University College. She holds a B.A. (cum laude) from the Roosevelt Academy and an LL.M. degree in Public International Law from Utrecht University. Arlinda is pursuing a doctoral degree in the interdisciplinary research of law and politics called "State-Building through Life Stories: Incorporating Local Perspectives”, supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). She has previously worked as a project intern at the Youth Initiative for Human Rights (YIHR) in Kosovo, as a legal intern at the International Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), as an external relations intern at the International Criminal Court (ICC) and as intern at various Ministries in the Republic of Kosovo. Her research interests are in post-conflict reconstruction, state, nation and peace building, the accountability of international organizations, international relations and diplomacy. Her research interests are in post-conflict reconstruction, state, nation and peace building, storytelling, humanitarian intervention and the accountability of international organizations.

Dr. Cordula Reimann has worked for nearly twenty years as consultant, facilitator, trainer, researcher and lecturer in gender, peacebuilding and conflict and peace studies. She has worked for different international and Swiss governmental agencies and non-governmental organisations like Crisis Management Initiative (CMI), amnesty international in London, the Institute for Multi-track Diplomacy (IMTD) in Washington, DC, GIZ (Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit) and the Berghof Research Center for Constructive Conflict Management in Berlin and for nearly ten years at swisspeace, where she was head of analysis and impact of peacebuilding. In that capacity, she conducted and led various trainings and evaluations on gender and peacebuilding, conflict sensitivity and the effectiveness and impact of peacebuilding programs. Cordula has field experiences mainly in South (East) Asia, sub-Saharan Africa and in the Middle East. With a doctorate in "Peace Studies" on gender, conflict and peacebuilding from the University of Bradford, Cordula was senior lecturer at different European and Swiss universities and visiting professor at the University of Graz, Austria. Her main areas of expertise are conflict sensitivity, strategic conflict analysis, impact assessment, gender, conflict, development and conflict transformation. Cordula is a trained mediator and has widely published on gender, conflict and peacebuilding and conflict transformation theory. In May 2011, Cordula set up her own consultancy, coaching and training business called “core. consultancy & training in conflict transformation”.

Cynthia Chamberlain is Legal Officer of the Trial Division at the International Criminal Court (ICC).  She has a Masters in International Law from the Universidad Autónoma and Universidad Complutense of Madrid, Spain and is currently writing her Ph.D. thesis in Leiden University, The Netherlands. Previously to her work in the ICC, she worked alongside Alda Facio, in the Women’s Justice and Gender Programme and as Professor in the University of Costa Rica.

Daniela Ingruber is an Austrian war researcher, journalist and editor, also working as a consultant for film productions and film festivals. Since 2008 she has been a core faculty member of the UNESCO Chair for Peace at the University of Innsbruck/Austria. From March 2017 on she will be Program Coordinator of the respective Peace Studies Master Program. Besides she lectures at the UN-mandated University for Peace (Upeace) in Costa Rica, in Thailand and at different Universities in Austria. Her main fields of research are conflict transformation through art, ethical journalism, war photography, storytelling as well as social hubs and their role in peaceful resistance. It is important for her to combine theory with practical work, thus she tries to combine academic research with experiences in art as well as in field work of conflict regions. Currently Daniela Ingruber is preparing 3 publications as a co-editor, one on transrational resonances of the many peaces (USA), one on art & politics (Austria) as well as one on endings (Singapore). www.nomadin.at nomadin@nomadin.at
David Ragland is Co-Founder and Co-director for the Truth Telling project of Ferguson and an Assistant Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at Juniata College. He researches and thinks about the moral dimensions of violence and trauma against vulnerable populations in the U.S as well as envisioning a world with reduced violence on all levels. As an activist, educator and scholar, his recent and past work is the ground level- in his home community near Ferguson, Mo. David's analysis is drawn from the radical teaching and scholarship of MLK, particularly in his description of the Triple evils of Militarism, Racism and Materials, as an ever present part of American life- calling us to a shift in values Dr. Ragland focuses specifically on how our society conceives justice as retributive and proposes a shift toward restorative justice to transform communities and criminal justice system and take the America's turbulent history and lives experiences into account for policies at all levels. David has recently written a chapter titled “Peace Education as an Ethical Framework to Situate Restorative Justice: Locating the Concerns of Communities of Color in Peace and Justice Discourse” in Peace Studies between Tradition and Innovation. David is a blogger for the Huffington Post and writes frequently for PeaceVoice and is currently working on a volume entitled “The Intellectual and Political History of Peacemakers of Color”. He is on the board of the directors for the Peace and Justice Studies Association and he is a member of the National Council for the Fellowship of Reconciliation. David studied critical race issues, peace education, philosophy and philosophy of education at University of Toledo, Teachers College Columbia University, The New School for Social Research, and Washington University of St. Louis.

Dr. Ellyn Kaschak has been widely recognized as one of the founders of the field of Feminist Psychology and Psychotherapy. As such, she has been honored with many awards in the field for her continuing intellectual and epistemological contributions, including many articles and presentations, keynote speeches, 12 edited books and her two groundbreaking books, Engendered Lives: A New Psychology of Women’s Experience (1992) and Sight Unseen: Gender and Race through Blind Eyes (2015). Dr. Kaschak has been Professor of Psychology at San Jose State University since 1974, where she has also been the Chairperson of the graduate program in Marriage, Family and Child Counseling and Director of the University's Family Counseling Service. Dr. Kaschak is also the editor of the Journal of Women and Therapy and has published numerous edited anthologies including Minding the Body, A New View of Women's Sexual Problems, Intimate Betrayal: Domestic Violence in Lesbian Relationships and Assault on the Soul: Women in the former Yugoslavia, co-edited with Dr. Sara Sharratt. Dr. Kaschak is the past Chair of the Feminist Therapy Institute and a Fellow of Division 35, the Psychology of Women, Division 12, Clinical Psychology, Division 44, LGBT Concerns, Division 45, Ethnic Minority Issues and Division 52, International Psychology of the American Psychological Association. She has been the recipient of highest honors including The Heritage Award and The Carolyn Wood Sherif Award of Division 35, The Distinguished Leader Award of the APA Committee on Women in Psychology and the Feminist Therapy Institute, as well as the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Division on LGBT issues. Website: http://www.ellynkaschak.com/

Rector Francisco Rojas Aravena, Chilean, PhD in Political Science from the University of Utrecht (Netherlands) and MS in Political Science from the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO). He specializes in international relations, human security, integration, Latin American political systems, negotiations –theory and practice- and international security and defense, and was the Secretary General of FLACSO (2004-2012) and Director of FLACSO Chile (1996-2004). He was also professor at the School of International Relations of the National University of Costa Rica (UNA) (1980-1990); Fulbright Professor at the Latin American and Caribbean Center (LACC) at Florida International University, Miami, United States. He is board member of the Spanish edition of Foreign Affairs, México; Advisory Board Member of Pensamiento Iberoamericano, Spain, also member of the Editorial Committee of Ciencia Política Magazine from the National University of Colombia. He also has done advisory and consulting works for various international agencies and governments in the region. He has written or edited more than 80 books, contributed with chapters in over 100 books and published over 138 articles in academic journals in Latin America, Asia, United States and Europe. Google yields records of these publications in 439 entries in 44 web pages.

Frans Viljoen obtained the degrees LLB, MA (in Afrikaans literature) and LLD (on the African regional human rights system) from the University of Pretoria (UP); and the degree LLM from Cambridge University.  In October 2007, he was appointed as Director of the Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria. He is also the academic co-ordinator of the LLM (Human Rights and Democratisation in Africa), presented by the Centre, in collaboration with seven partner law faculties across Africa. He is also the author of numerous articles, especially dealing with human rights issues, and International human rights law in Africa. He is editor-in-chief of the African Human Rights Law Journal and co-editor of the English and French versions of the African Human Rights Law Reports

Head, Dept. of Peace and Conflict Studies, Assistant Professor, and Academic Coordinator Gender and Peace Building Programme and Peace Education Programme

Dr. Gal Harmat holds a PhD in Gender Analysis of Peace Education and Dialogue encounters from Nitra University (Slovakia) and a M.A. in Gender and Peacebuilding from the UN-Mandated University for Peace in Costa Rica. She was a professor in conflict transformation, peace education and gender and Co-Director of the Social Justice and Peace Education Teachers Training Program, Kibbutzim Teachers College in Tel Aviv, Israel. She has also been teaching in the World Peace Academy (University of Basel), the European Peace University (Austria), and the Arts and Social Change College in Israel. As a Gender and Peacebuilding Specialist, she has extensive experience in training, conflict analysis, dialogue facilitation, capacity building, peace education, research, gender empowerment and gender mainstreaming since 1998 in various countries in Eastern Europe, Africa, and West and South East Asia. Her consultancies include intergovernmental organizations (e.g. OSCE, UN Women, UNDP, and the Council of Europe), various international and regional NGOs (e.g. Non Violent Peace Force, Friends of the Earth Middle East; Peres Centre for Peace) and corporate donors (e.g. United Bank of Switzerland; Optimus Foundation).

Gal Peleg Laniado, J Street, Deputy Regional Director. Gal has joined J Street with over a decade of nonprofit expertise from his extensive work in conflict resolution, leadership development, and community outreach and empowerment in both Israel and the United States. Most recently, Gal served simultaneously as the Central Shaliach of Hashomer Hatzair Youth Movement in North America, as well as the Israel Representative for the Givat Haviva Educational Foundation in the United States. Hashomer Hatzair is a progressive Zionist youth movement that specializes in youth-led experiential Jewish Education, and Givat Haviva is the authority on and birthplace of Shared Society in Israel. Previously in Israel, Gal held the position of International Development Manager for Mifalot, an Israeli nonprofit that aims to create social change through educational projects targeting young people through Soccer. Gal was also the Director of the Sports Department at the Peres Center for Peace in Israel, which promotes regional and national peacebuilding efforts. Gal holds an MA in Conflict Resolution and Mediation from the Tel Aviv University, and a BA with honors in Communications and International Relations from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is also a graduate of the Columbia Business School’s Senior Leaders Program for Nonprofit Professionals. Born on Kibbutz Sdot-Yam, Israel Gal now lives in New York City with his husband Moshe.
El General de División Alberto Asarta Cuevas nació en Zaragoza (España) el 14 de noviembre de 1951. Ingresó en la Academia General Militar de Zaragoza como cadete en 1971 y fue ascendido a Teniente en 1975. El General de División Asarta estuvo en los empleos de Teniente y Capitán entre los años 1975 y 1988, donde sirvió en la Brigada Paracaidista (8 años), la Legión Española (2 años) y el Regimiento de Infantería “Canarias 50” (3 años). Durante este tiempo estuvo como Jefe de Sección y de Compañía. Los dos últimos años estuvo como Capitán Instructor de la Escuela de Paracaidismo. Fue ascendido a Comandante en 1988. De 1988 a 1990 estudió en la Escuela de Guerra del Ejército de Tierra, en Madrid, donde se graduó en Estado Mayor. Fue destinado a diferentes Unidades de la Fuerza así como a Cuarteles Generales durante sus empleos de Comandante, Teniente Coronel y Coronel. Como Comandante, el General Asarta fue el segundo oficial en ser destinado al Cuartel General del EUROCUERPO, en Estrasburgo (Francia), entre febrero de 1993 y julio de 1996. Alcanzó el puesto de Jefe de la Sección de Entrenamiento y Ejercicios en el Cuartel General de la Fuerza de Maniobra, como Teniente Coronel, entre 1996 al 2000. Como Coronel, el General Asarta fue destinado a la División de Planes del Estado Mayor del Ejército, desde 2002 hasta 2003. Desde diciembre de 2003 a diciembre de 2005, estuvo al mando del Regimiento de Infantería Mecanizada “Castilla 16”, donde participó además en misión militar en Irak. Fue ascendido a General de Brigada en marzo de 2006. Desde Julio de 2006 estuvo al mando de la Brigada de Infantería Acorazada XII, hasta septiembre de 2009. Ascendido a General de División en septiembre de 2009 comienza su preparación y la de su equipo para incorporarse a la misión de UNIFIL (United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon) como Head of Mission and Force Commander, desde enero de 2010 hasta enero de 2012 Desde mayo de 2012 hasta el 31 de Marzo de 2013 en que pasa a la situación de reserva, ocupa el cargo de General Adjunto al Teniente General Jefe de la Unidad Militar de Emergencias. El General Asarta ha completado su formación con otros estudios durante su etapa militar. Obtuvo una Diplomatura en Educación Física y un Máster en Defensa Nacional, éste último cursado en Argentina, obteniendo en ambos el primer puesto y con la calificación de sobresaliente. Además, ha completado un gran número de cursos OTAN en la Escuela OTAN de Alemania. El General Asarta posee un nivel fluido de inglés (S.L.P. 3.3.4.4.) y de francés (S.L.P. 4.4.4.4.). Le han sido concedidas diversas condecoraciones tanto nacionales como internacionales, siendo la más importante la Cruz al Mérito Militar con Distintivo Rojo. Otras condecoraciones incluyen la Gran Cruz al Mérito Militar con Distintivo Blanco, la Gran Cruz de la Real y Militar Orden de San Hermenegildo, cinco Cruces al Mérito Militar con Distintivo Blanco, dos Medalla OTAN, dos Medallas ONU (ONUCA, UNIFIL), una Medalla Plateada del Ejército Polaco, la Medalla Conmemorativa Francesa durante su servicio en Bosnia, la Medalla Conmemorativa Polaca durante su servicio en Iraq, la Medalla por la Paz de la República de Italia, Medalla de las Naciones Unidad (FINUL-Líbano), Medalla de la Orden del Cedro del Líbano, Medalla de la Orden Nacional del Cedro-Grado de Comendador-del Líbano, Insignia Conmemorativa del Ejército Libanés. En el ámbito civil y desde su pase a la reserva (31 Marzo de 2013), el General Asarta es profesor del Master de Relaciones Internacionales que imparte la Universidad Alfonso X de Madrid así como conferenciante y colaborador con el Instituto Berg de Derechos Humanos en Otzenhausen (Alemania) y Bogotá (Colombia). Igualmente ha participado como conferenciante en el Instituto de estudios Fiscales de Madrid (Madrid), con el CiT Pax Toledo (Madrid), y con el Observatorio para Género del Ministerio de Defensa español (Nairobi-Kenia y Amsterdan), en SOMERO 2015 (Gijón-España), en las universidades de Logroño, Málaga, Cartagena y Valladolid (Aula María Zambrano en Segovia) (2016), en los cursos de verano de la Academia General del Aire (2016) y en el Ilustre Colegio de Abogados de Barcelona (Ene. 2017). El general Asarta ha sido autor y colaborador de diversos artículos y monografías relativos a temas de su profesión militar y que han sido publicados por el Instituto Español de Estudios Estratégicos y por el Centro Superior de Estudios de la Defensa Nacional, entre los que cabe destacar, “La relación EEUU-China desde la II Guerra Mundial”, “UNIFIL, un instrumento para la Paz en Oriente Medio” y “el Nivel Operacional” Desde Enero de 2014 a Enero de 2016 ha trabajado como asesor en asunto de Defensa para la empresa INDRA (multinacional española de alta tecnología)

Gudmundur Eiriksson (LL.B King’s College, University of London; LL.M Columbia University)  is currently Ambassador of Iceland to India. Ambassador Eiriksson served as a Law of the Sea Officer in the Office of the Secretary-General of the United Nations for the Law of the Sea from 1974 to 1976 and as a Special Consultant at the Third UN Conference on the Law of the Sea in 1977.  He joined the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Iceland in 1977, with the rank of Ambassador since 1988, and served as Assistant Legal Adviser (1977-1980), Legal Adviser (1980-1996), Ambassador to Canada, Nicaragua, Colombia, Panama, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Venezuela and Peru (2003-2005) and Ambassador to South Africa (2008-2009).  He was appointed as the first Chairman of the Icelandic National Committee on International Humanitarian Law (2008). He was Director of International Law and Human Rights Studies and Dean for Cooperative Programmes at the University for Peace in Costa Rica from 2001 to 2003 and Professor and Head of the Department of International Law and Human Rights from 2005 to 2008. He served as Legal Adviser to the University’s Council from 2004-2008. He has served as a Judge on the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (1996-2002) and President of the Chamber for Fisheries Disputes (1999-2002). He is also a former member of the International Law Commission (1987-1996). He is a member of the Panel of Conciliators and Arbitrators, Center for Arbitrations, Mediation and Conciliation, Dakar, the Panel of Conciliators and Panel of Arbitrators, International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes, Washington, and the International Council of Environmental Law, Bonn. He is a Member of the Editorial Board of the Inter-American & European Human Rights Journal/ Revista Interamericana & Europea de Derechos Humanos and of the Advisory Board of the Nordic Journal of International Law.

Heather Kertyzia is currently an assistant professor of Negotiation, Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding at California State University Dominguez Hills. She focuses on peace education, working with teachers in participatory action research to create more peaceful secondary schools. As a former secondary school teacher, Heather understands the importance of the local community in building more socially, economically and environmentally just educational spaces. As an interdisciplinary student and scholar, she has worked with communities throughout the Americas, with a recent focus on partnering with local grassroots organizations in Nicaragua.
Héctor Olásolo Alonso Profesor Titular de Carrera, Universidad del Rosario (Colombia) Presidente, Instituto Ibero-Americano de la Haya (IIH, Holanda) Licenciado y Doctor en Derecho, con premio extraordinario de doctorado, por la Universidad de Salamanca. Magister por la Universidad de Columbia en Nueva York, donde fue nombrado Kent Scholar. Actualmente se desempeña como Profesor Titular de Carrera de Derecho Internacional de la Universidad del Rosario, Presidente del Instituto Iberoamericano de la Haya y Miembro del Miembro del roster de juristas de reconocido prestigio de la Organización de las Naciones Unidas para el nombramiento magistrados internacionales en el Tribunal Internacional para Camboya. Ha sido magistrado auxiliar de la Corte Penal Internacional, miembro de la Fiscalía del Tribunal Penal Internacional para la ex Yugoslavia, Experto asesor del Tribunal Especial para el Líbano creado por el Consejo de Seguridad de Naciones Unidas en 2007, y Perito ante la Corte Inter-Americana de Derechos Humanos. Ha dictado cursos de doctorado, postgrado y conferencias, además de en Colombia y España, en Alemania, Argentina, Bèlgica, Brasil, Canadá, Chile, Costa Rica, Estados Unidos, Francia, Holanda, Italia, México, Nicaragua, Perú, Reino Unido, Serbia, Sudáfrica, Suiza, Uruguay y Venezuela. Ha publicado 15 monografías y más de 50 artículos y capítulos de libros en español, inglés y holandés, y es actualmente el director del Anuario Ibero-Americano de Derecho Internacional Penal publicado por la Editorial de la Universidad del Rosario, la Editorial Tirant lo Blanch de España y el Instituto Ibero-Americano de la Haya en Holanda.

Currently professor of Theory and Practice of International Development at the Institute of Social Studies (ISS) in the Netherlands, he graduated as economist at Erasmus University in Rotterdam (NL) in 1964.  He has been Minister for Development Cooperation from 1973-1977 and in 1989-1994 and Minister of Housing, spatial planning and enviornemnt in 1998-2002.  He has also been active Member of Parliament for several legislative periods.  From 2004 to 2006 he became the special representative Secretary General of the United Nations in Sudan and between 1980 and 1986 the Deputy Secretary-General of UNCTAD in Geneva.  Between 2000-2001 he was elected as Chairman of the 6th Conference of Parites at the UN Convention on Climate Change.  In 2001 he joined the Special Envoy of the Secretary General of United Nations for the World Summit on Sustainable Development (2001-2003).  In 2002 he became Chairman of the Board of the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED, London 2002-2004) and in 2003 also Chairman of Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) in Geneva (2003-2004).  At the same time he was Chairman of the Federation of Refugee Organisations in the Netherlands from 2003 to 2004 and recently the President of the IKV, Interchurch Peace Council and the President of the Society for International Development (SID, Roma 2008-).
During his carreer, he received several special honours as Dr Honoris Causa at the University San Marcos in Lima, Peru (1974) and at the Institute of Social Studies in The Hague (2002).  Among others, he also became the Officier of Legion D'Honneur of France (2001) and the Officer in de Orde van Oranje Nassau of the Netherlands (2002).

 

Jan Hessbruegge is taking a sabbatical leave from the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). Since 2005, he has worked as a United Nations human rights officer for the United Nations, where he worked for the Office of the High Commissioner on Human Rights, United Nations peacekeeping missions in Sudan and Haiti, the Commissions of Inquiry on Human Rights in Syria and North Korea, the Special Rapporteur on Violence against Women and the Representative of the Secretary-General on Internally Displaced Persons. He holds a law degree from the University of Muenster in Germany, a Master of Law and Diplomacy from the Fletcher School and the Diploma in Public International Law of the Hague Academy of International Law. Jan is currently pursuing a doctorate in international law at the European University Viadrina in Frankfurt (Oder), Germany.
Jan Breitling is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environment and Development at University for Peace. He holds a BSc. in Tropical Forestry, from the Technological Institute of Costa Rica, and a MSc. in Environmental Sciences from WUR Wageningen University and Research Center, The Netherlands. His research interests include root causes of deforestation and Global Environmental Change, and Environmental Governance, specifically market based approaches addressing biodiversity conservation and Climate Change.
Jana Lozanoska, LL.M in international humanitarian law from the University of Geneva, is a Doctoral Candidate at the University for Peace. Her research is a critique on human rights that is based on the idea of human dignity as proposed by the German-Jewish political theorist Hannah Arendt. Her current research interests are in the field of human rights, political theory and political philosophy. Her professional career of twelve years is a combination of academia, research and policy area. She served as an Adviser to the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Macedonia for two years. She had contributed frequently as regular columnist in several daily newspapers in Macedonia. Lozanoska had published three poetry books and one novel. She continues to research and publish on issues related to international law, human rights, gender and LGBT, regional and international organizations. Follow her doctoral research blog at: https://rethinkinghumanity.wordpress.com/

Jerry W. Sanders is retired from the University of California, Berkeley where he served as Professor and Chair of Peace and Conflict Studies.  Dr. Sanders’ teaching and research interests include cosmopolitan and critical peace theory; globalization and governance; human security and peacebuilding; militarization and geopolitics; and neo-conservatism in American political culture and foreign policy.   He is the author of Peddlers of Crisis: The Committee On The Present Danger and The Politics of Containment (South End Press, 1983), a co-founder of the World Policy Journal, and a contributing author to the Oxford International Encyclopedia of Peace (Oxford University Press, 2010).   Dr. Sanders is also founder and director of  The Summer Peace Institute in Human Security and Peacebuilding Practice at the UN-mandated University for Peace (Costa Rica), in partnership with the University of California, Berkeley.  In addition to his academic writings, he has published articles in World Policy, The Nation, The Progressive, In These Times, and  Mothers Jones.   Dr. Sanders received the Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley (1980) and served as a community development Peace Corps Volunteer in Colombia (1967-69).   He has also taught abroad in Spain, Mexico, Sweden, and Argentina. 

He is currently a Senior Legal Officer at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, where he has worked since 2007. He obtained his law degree (JD equivalent) at the Universidad Iberoamericana (UIA), Mexico City, and an LL.M. degree in International Legal Studies at American University-Washington College of Law in 2007. He has also undertaken specialized studies in international criminal law at Leiden University. In Mexico, Jorge was active in different NGOs and worked on several community projects with indigenous peoples. He also worked as a Deputy Visitor at the Human Rights Commission of Mexico City (Ombudsman). He was a Research Assistant at the Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law and an intern at Human Rights First in Washington, D.C, and Seconded Jurist at the ECHR in France. He has been a Professor on Human Rights at the University of Costa Rica (UCR) and in other international Masters programs in the Americas, as well as lectured in different countries in the Americas, Europe, and Africa. He is author of several articles on international human rights.
Doctor en Ciencias Políticas por la Universidad Complutense y M.A. en Relaciones Internacionales por la Universidad para la Paz de Naciones Unidas. Profesor Titular de relaciones internacionales de la Universidad Complutense (acreditado Catedrático de Universidad), e investigador del Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales (ICEI), donde dirige el área de Relaciones internacionales, cooperación al desarrollo y gobernanza global. Ha trabajado para la Agencia Española de Cooperación Internacional para el Desarrollo (AECID) y la Federación Internacional de Cruz Roja, y ha sido investigador o consultor de la Comisión y el Parlamento Europeo, el PNUD, SEGIB, la Fundación Carolina, la Fundación EU-LAC, y distintas ONG. En dos periodos distintos ha sido Vocal Experto del Consejo de Cooperación al Desarrollo. Vicepresidente de la Red Española de Estudios de Desarrollo (REEDES), miembro del Comité científico de honor de la Coordinadora Regional de Investigaciones Económicas y Sociales (CRIES), y del Patronato de Oxfam Intermón. Cuenta con un largo historial de publicaciones, accesibles en http://ucm.academia.edu/JoséAntonioSanahuja

Juan Carlos Sainz-Borgo is the Dean for Academic Affairs and Associate Professor at UPEACE. He is also Associate Professor of International Law at the Universidad Central de Venezuela in Caracas since 1998. Professor of Humanitarian International Law at the Universidad Sergio Arboleda in Bogota since 2009; he was Fulbright Visiting Professor at the Washington College of Law at the American University in 2008-2009. He served as Jurist to the Regional Delegation of Venezuela and the Caribbean of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). Juan Carlos Sainz-Borgo has a Law Degree, Master in International Law and Doctorate (Cum Laude) from the Universidad Central de Venezuela in Caracas and a Master Degree from Oxford University, UK. He has published four books on international law and international relations and a numerous articles in different publications in the field.

Juergen Carls (Ph.D.) is associated with the Department of Environment and Development since 2002. He is giving classes on sustainable development, strategic planning, project management and fundraising for international cooperation projects. Before he was teaching sustainable development at the Humboldt University of Berlin.

He studied "International Rural Development" and completed his doctoral dissertation at the Technical University of Berlin. His long term experiences as manager and government advisor of international research and cooperation projects financed by the WB, IADB, EU, FAO, GTZ in Asia, Africa and Latin America has been documented in 70 publications.

Dr. Julie Watson is a PhD in geography with expertise in transboundary water conflict and cooperation.
Julie's goal is to figure out ways we can collaborate more effectively over shared water resources while addressing inequities in access to water for all its uses. She's especially interested in environmental justice, participatory processes, and the integration of qualitative, hard-to-measure values alongside the quantifiable in more holistic decision-making frameworks.
Julie is certified in mediation and transboundary water conflict transformation. She has produced a documentary film and measured its value as a facilitation tool, and she has created training modules and conducted workshops to build practitioner capacity for conflict management. Julie's passion is creating a resilient process and facilitating stronger partnerships to catalyze creative, strategic, and resilient water governance solutions for more peaceful, just water management.

 

Julie Diane Recinos is a senior coordinating attorney at the InterAmerican Court of Human Rights, where she has worked since 2008. She holds a BA in history and political science magna cum laude from the University of Florida and a JD cum laude from the University of Notre Dame, both in the US. She has also undertaken advanced studies in human rights at the University of Oxford, UK, and has written and taught on international human rights instruments and standards in various academic and governmental institutions around the world. She specializes in gender rights.

Kees Wiebering has been a professional practitioner in peacebuilding projects since the mid-1990s. Over the years, he designed, implemented, monitored and evaluated peacebuilding projects, as well as taught and facilitated many workshops on cross cutting peace building related issues. He works as independent consultant, mediator, trainer and coach for professionals in peacebuilding. His work focuses on dialogue, conflict sensitivity, peace and conflict impact assessment, intercultural communication, project development and peace education.

He holds a Master of Science in Philosophy and Physics and holds degrees in organisation development and mediation. He was member of the core-trainer team for a 4-month course for peacebuilders at the Academy for Conflict Transformation in Cologne, Germany. He is an independent lecturer at the Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main. His research interests are the role of dialogue in peace processes, civil society development and NGO cooperation.

Lilya Akay is German of Turkish origin and she is a Research and Training Associate and Co-author of the C.R. SIPPABIO and “…Say Peace” Manuals. Lilya has completed her Master’s degree in Peace and Conflict Studies at the Hacettepe University in Ankara, Turkey in 2016. She is committed to countering Islamophobia and violent extremism, as well as working for women’s rights. Her Master’s thesis assesses the public discourse in Germany, discussing the relationship between public discourse and discrimination against hijab-wearing women in Germany. Lilya has a Bachelor’s degree in International Business and Management from Inholland University, Amsterdam, 2014. Lilya is an alumna of the 2015 Law and Leadership Summer Program of Karamah, she assisted the August 2015 training of Ikram and Karamah: “Promoting Healthy Marriage and Preventing Divorce in our Communities”. She participated in October 2015 in the Training of Trainers for the “…Say Peace” manual.

Dr. Maciej Bartkowski is Senior Director for Education & Research at the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict (ICNC), which is an independent, non-profit educational foundation based in Washington DC (USA) that develops and encourages the study and use of civilian-based, nonmilitary strategies aimed at establishing and defending human rights, democratic self-rule and justice worldwide. Dr. Bartkowski works on academic programs for students, faculty, and professionals, curricular development, and global academic and educational outreach and research in the growing field of civil resistance studies. He has taught or lectured on strategic nonviolent conflict, movement's mobilization, nonviolent actions, civil resistance and democratization at various academic institutions around the world, including George Mason University, John Hopkins University (adjunct faculty), Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, Amsterdam University, University of Basque Country and Deusto University in Bilbao, Central European University in Budapest, Cambridge University, Rosario University in Bogota, SAIS program in Bologna, Honk Kong University, Euro-Mediterranean University in Slovenia, Collegium Civitas in Poland, Cairo University in Egypt and UPEACE.. His numerous publications on nonviolent movements, strategic nonviolent conflict and civil resistance include, Rediscovering Nonviolent History. Civil Resistance in Liberation Struggles and Nation-Making (Editor, Lynne Rienner, 2013), chapters in Understanding Nonviolence: Contours and Context (Hallward & Norman, Polity Press, 2014), and (coauthored) "Myopia of the Syrian Struggle: Key Lessons" in Future of Authoritarianism (Atlantic Council, 2014). He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science and M.A. in International Relations and European Studies from Central European University in Budapest, completed his undergraduate work at the American University of Central Asia in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, and speaks fluent English, Polish and Russian, as well as some Ukrainian and German.

Head, Dept. of Peace and Conflict Studies, Assistant Professor and Academic Coordinator of International Peace Studies Programme and International Peace Studies with specialization in Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Programme
Dr. Manish Thapa is Resident Professor of International Peace Studies at UPEACE. He is one of the founding members of Department of Conflict, Peace & Development Studies at Tribhuvan University Nepal (2007-2015). He is also currently Visiting Professor at the Institute of International Relations, University of Warsaw, Poland and Senior Research Fellow at Center for Europe – University of Warsaw- Poland. He received his Post Doctorate in International Relations from the University of Warsaw. He has served as Research Fellow in several universities and institutes in Europe and North America such as the University of Warsaw; Department of Peace & Conflict Research, Uppsala University; Brown University; McGill-Echenberg Human Rights Fellow & Jeanne Sauvé Scholar, McGill University; Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame. His publications include 6 books and numerous journal articles and book chapters including "Foreign Policy in the Global South: Anti-Westernism, Rhetoric and Identity" (Co-editor), London: Routledge 2017 (Forthcoming - In Press); "From Bullet to Ballot – Peacemaking and Peacebuilding in Nepal: Lessons Learned and Unlearned" (Editor), London: Routledge 2017 (Proposal accepted); "Internal Conflicts & Peacebuilding Challenges" (Editor), New Delhi: K W Publishers 2016 and "India in the Contemporary World: Polity, Economy and International Relations" (Co-editor), London: Routledge 2014.

Miembro del Comité Asesor de los Estados Partes en el Tratado Roma para asesorar en la escogencia de los candidatos a jueces del Tribunal Penal Internacional; ExJuez (2004 – 2015) y Exvicepresidente de la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos; Miembro de la “International Law Association”; Miembro de la “American Society of International Law”; Miembro del “Instituto Hispano-Luso-Americano y Filipino de Derecho Internacional”; Miembro Honorario de la “Asociación Costarricense de Derecho Internacional” y reconocido por ésta con el Premio “Manuel María de Peralta”; Miembro Correspondiente de la Asociación Argentina de Derecho Internacional; Miembro del “Consejo Editorial de la Revista do Instituto Brasileiro de Direitos Humanos”, Miembro del Consejo Editorial del Boletín de la Sociedad Brasileña de Derecho Internacional y homenajeado por el Instituto Brasileño de Derechos Humanos con el “Premio Derechos Humanos 2014” y la “Medalla Antônio Augusto Cançado Trindade”; homenajeado por el Colegio de Abogados de Costa Rica con el Premio “Rodolfo Piza Escalante”, y Presidente Honorario del Instituto Colombiano de Derechos Humanos. Correo electrónico: manuelventura.robles@gmail.com

 

Codirectora del Instituto universitario DEMOSPAZ en la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM). Directora del Centro de Educación e Investigación para la Paz (CEIPAZ) de la Fundación Cultura de Paz. Vicepresidenta de WILPF-España (Liga Internacional de Mujeres por la Paz y la Libertad). Miembro del Comité Internacional de la red Global Action to Prevent War y del Comité de Expertos sobre el Peace Index. Dirige el anuario de CEIPAZ sobre paz y conflictos desde 2004 hasta la actualidad. Vocal Experta en el Consejo de Cooperación ( 2009-2012). Miembro del Consejo de Redacción de la revista Documentación Social y de Pensamiento Propio. Profesora y docente en diversos master, cursos y seminarios. Ha sido presidenta de la Asociación Española de Investigación para la Paz (AIPAZ) en el periodo 2006-2013. Sus líneas de investigación actuales se centran en el papel de la sociedad civil en la construcción de la paz y en particular sobre el papel de las mujeres en la construcción de la paz, violencia transnacional en Centroamérica y Comunicación y Educación para el Desarrollo.

M.Sc. in Marine Biology, Universidad de Costa Rica.  Ph.D. candidate, Marine Affairs Department, University of Rhode Island. Coordinator, Southern Central America Marine Program, Conservation International. Member of the Costa Rican Ocean Commission, in representation of Conservation International and of the Costa Rican Marine resources sub-commission, within the Presidential “Peace with Nature” Initiative. Appointed to Costa Rica’s technical working group for the South Pacific, for the assessment of the viability of establishing a new marine protected area in Costa Rica’s south Pacific. As a member of Costa Rica’s EEZ Commission, active participation in the elaboration of Costa Rica’s National Marine Strategy. Professor, Introduction to Fisheries Management (B-0681), School of Biology, University of Costa Rica.

Dr. Celina Del Felice is a peace educator and researcher from Argentina currently based in Spain. She is an e-learning tutor for the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC), the Network University and the North-South Centre of the Council of Europe working in its global education programme. She has a background in Peace and Conflict Studies, with broad experience at the interface between academic and practical and action-oriented research. She completed her PhD in International Relations/ Development Studies at Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands (2013). Her research was about transnational activism and economic justice issues. Prior to that, she worked for the International Association of Educating Cities in its regional office for Latin America based at the Municipality of Rosario, Argentina (2000-2003), and the United Network of Young Peacebuilders, the Netherlands (2003-2006) on youth policy, social inclusion and peace education. Email: cdel_felice@uoc.edu and celina@humblebees.org

Recent publications:

Del Felice, C, Veeneman, I., Trubceac, A., Schweitzer, S., Marti, L.; Capozzi, I. and Fenyosi, F. (2016) The Learning Curve, An evaluation guide for youth peace organisations. The Hague: United Network of Young Peacebuilders. Accessible at: http://www.unoy.org/evaluationguide

Del Felice, C., Karako A. and Wisler, A. eds. (2015) Peace Education Evaluation: Learning from Experience and Exploring Prospects. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Press.

María Pía Carazo Ortiz (Costa Rica) has a Law degree from the University of Costa Rica (1996) and an LL.M. degree from the University of Heidelberg, Germany (1999). She is currently completing her Ph.D., also at the University of Heidelberg. Her areas of research include fundamental issues of Public International Law, Refugee Law, International Criminal Law, Transitional Justice, Human Rights (with an emphasis on regional protection systems) and Comparative Legal Studies (specially of Latin America, Spain, Portugal and Germany). Among her previous work experience she worked as a junior research fellow at Max-Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg, Germany. She has also lectured and taught at different institutions, including the University of Bonn, Germany.

Mariateresa Garrido is Teaching Assistant and a Doctoral Student at UPEACE. She holds two Master's Degrees one from UPEACE in International Law and the Settlement of the Disputes and one from the Central University of Venezuela in International Law. Prior to her Master's Degree she had been working in promoting and defending human rights in Venezuela with different organizations such as Transparency International and Espacio Publico. Her principal research area is related to freedom of expression and safety of journalists.

Political scientist and prize-winning author Mary King is Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies, University for Peace. She has served as an Academic Adviser to the Africa programme, among other roles. She is also Distinguished Scholar with The American University Center for Global Peace, in Washington, DC, and a fellow with the Rothermere American Institute, University of Oxford, United Kingdom.
King has been a practitioner of international relations for 30 years—requiring personal contact with heads of state and government ministers of more than 120 developing countries. While a presidential appointee in the Carter Administration, confirmed by the U.S. Senate, she had responsibility for the Peace Corps (60 countries), VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America), and other national volunteer service corps programs. Since 1984, she has served as a special adviser to former president Jimmy Carter. 
As a young student, she worked alongside the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (no relation) in the U.S. civil rights movement. She was one of what the New York Times called a “tiny handful” of white, female “heroic, unsung organizers of the Southern civil rights movement.” Her book on that epochal four-year experience, Freedom Song: A Personal Story of the 1960s Civil Rights Movement, won her a Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Book Award in 1988. 
In 2002 the second edition of her book, Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr: The Power of Nonviolent Action, chronicling nine contemporary nonviolent struggles and originally published by UNESCO in Paris in 1999, was brought out in New Delhi by Mehta Publishers and the Indian Council for Cultural Relations. 
Her latest book is A Quiet Revolution: The First Palestinian Intifada and Nonviolent Resistance (New York: Nation Books, 2007; London: Perseus Books, 2008).
Next to come is a reference book: The New York Times and Democratic Transitions in Eastern Europe, 1977-2005 (Washington, DC: C Q Press/Sage, 2009).
She is currently completing a book project, Conversion and the Mechanisms of Change in Nonviolent Action: The 1924–25 Vykom Satyagraha Case, a study of an historic nonviolent struggle against untouchability in Kerala, India, in 1924?25, with a grant award from the United States Institute of Peace.
King was co-author, with Casey Hayden, of “Sex and Caste,” a document published by the War Resisters League in 1966 that served as kindling for second-wave feminism. The Americanist historian Ruth Rosen in The World Split Open: How the Women=s Movement Changed America says this article makes her a central figure in starting the contemporary U.S. women=s movement.
Her doctorate in international politics is from the University of Wales at Aberystwyth. In 1989, her alma mater Ohio Wesleyan University bestowed on her its highest award for distinguished achievement.
In November 2003, she was given the Jamnalal Bajaj International Award, which recognizes the promotion of Gandhian values. In receiving this prize in Mumbai (Bombay), India, she joined the ranks of such previous winners as Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu of South Africa, Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat of the United Kingdom, and Professor Johan Galtung of Norway.

Dr. Mayumi Yamada (Japan) Assistant Professor and Doctoral Programme Coordinator.
Prior to joining UPEACE, Dr. Mayumi Yamada worked as the Recovery, Reintegration & Peace Building (RRP) Officer, United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) (April, 2013 - June 30, 2014). During the December Crisis 2013 in South Sudan, she remained as a critical (life-saving) staff, directly managed one of the biggest Protection of Civilians sites (UNMISS Tomping PoC) and supported humanitarian assistance during armed-conflicts in the capital Juba. At least 27,000 people’s lives were saved in the UNMISS Tomping compound. Before the crisis, she drafted the United Nations Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF) South Sudan (2014-2016). Before joining UNMISS, she worked with UNDP Offices in Kazakhstan, Maldives, Lao PDR and Solomon Islands. She holds a Ph.D. in Sustainable Development (Poverty Reduction & Environment Conservation: Watershed Management Programme with CARE International Nepal) from Imperial College London, UK. She worked with Disaster Management Planning Unit of United Nations Centre for Regional Development, UNCRD), being one of the survivors from the Great Hanshin-Awaji earthquake in 1995. She is also the Visiting Research Fellow, Global Collaboration Centre (GLOCOL) of Osaka University.

Dr. Kanade is the Head of the Department of International Law and Human Rights at UPEACE, and is the Director of the UPEACE Human Rights Centre. He holds a Ph.D. in Peace and Conflict Studies with a specialization in Human Rights (Multilateral Trading System and Human Rights: A Governance Space Theory on Linkages) and a Masters degree in International Law and the Settlement of Disputes from UPEACE. He also holds a LL.B. from Nagpur University, India. Prior to joining UPEACE in 2009, Mihir practiced for 6 years as a lawyer in the Supreme Court of India and the Bombay High Court, focusing on issues of fundamental human rights violations. His principal area of academic research is Globalization and Human Rights.
Dr. Miriam Estrada-Castillo (Ecuador) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of International Law and Human Rights. Prior to joining UPEACE, Dr. Estrada-Castillo worked as the senior legal and political officer in the United Nations Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED). Prior to that position, she has worked with the UN system in various capacities, including as the International Prosecutor General, UN Peacekeeping Mission for East-Timor (DPKO), Expert and Vice-Chairperson of the Monitoring Committee of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), Chief of Field of the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, and the Latin America Regional Adviser on Gender, Human Rights and Culture of Peace for UNESCO. She has also worked as the President of the Ecuadorian Supreme Court of Juvenile Justice and as the Minister of Social Affairs in Ecuador. In her academic life, she worked recently as the Director of Master Degree Courses on Gender and the Law and Children in Armed Conflict, Lund University, Sweden. She is a Visiting Professor of the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law (RWI) and has also taught courses as a Visiting Professor at the Australian National University. She is the author of the Ecuadorian Law on Violence against Women and of the first Legislation for Minors and Family in the country.

Executive Director, Earth Charter International Secretariat and the Earth Charter Center on Education for Sustainable Development
Mirian Vilela is the Executive Director of the Earth Charter International Secretariat and the Earth Charter Center on Education for Sustainable Development at the UPeace. Mirian has been spearheading the Initiative internationally since 1996, which has involved working with NGOs, Universities, Local Communities and Government officials. This effort was originally undertaken in collaboration with the National Councils for Sustainable Development initiative. She has lead and facilitated numerous international workshops and seminars on values and principles for sustainability. She has also participated in several annual meetings of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development, as well as Preparatory Conferences to the World Summit on Sustainable Development, the Johannesburg Summit itself and the Rio+20 Conference. Prior to her work with the Earth Charter, Mirian worked for the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) for two years in preparation to the 1992 UN Earth Summit and a year in UNCTAD - United Nations Conference on Trade and Development. She moved from Geneva to Costa Rica in 1993 to join in the establishment of the Earth Council, an NGO established to follow up the Earth Summit agreements and promote the establishments of National Councils for Sustainable Development. Mirian is the coordinator of the UNESCO Chair on Education for Sustainable Development with the Earth Charter, she holds a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, where she was an Edward Mason Fellow and a B.Sc. with focus on International Trade. She is currently working on a Doctorate on Education focusing her research on education for sustainability.

Director of the UPEACE Centre for Executive and Professional Education and a faculty member at UPEACE. Prior to this position, he served as Education Programme Manager of the Earth Charter Initiative, an international nonprofit organization. Before his 4-years in the non-profit sector, he worked both in the private sector and also as a high school teacher in Ecuador. He has a Bachelor's degree from Stanford University and his Master's from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Former Coordinator of the RMSED Programme at the University for Peace, Costa Rica from 2009 to July 2011. She Owns a Msc in Post-war reconstruction, graduated with distinction in 1999, University of York (UK). Bsc in Economics, graduated Cum Laude, 1992, University La Sapienza of Rome (Italy). Technical Diploma in accounting and foreign Languages, graduated in 1986, (Italy).

She has been working since 18 years in developing countries and war-torn societies in Africa (Uganda and Egypt), Asia (Indonesia), Middle East (Jordan, WBG, Lebanon, Yemen), Central America (Guatemala, Costa Rica) and the Balkans (BiH, Kosovo, Serbia, Macedonia) heading and managing emergency, rehabilitation and development projects for the European Commission (several years), SNV-Dutch Cooperation (1999-2001), CARE Nederland (2001-2008), MOVIMONDO (Consortium of Italian NGOs- 1995-1998).  She was also research fellow of the Institute of Nutrition for Central America and Panama (INCAP); University of York (UK) for research projects in Indonesia/Aceh and Lebanon/Beiruth; and of the University of Rome.  
An ethnobiologist who researches food harvesting in Costa Rica. For the past decade her research program has focused on access to food in Costa Rican national parks. Specifically her emphasis has been on Indigenous rights to access and harvest cultural food. Olivia is a member of the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the International Society of Ethnobiology, the Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage Project, and the POLIS Project on Ecological Governance. Being active within these networks allows her to work at the interface of policy and practice regarding food harvesting and access.

Docteur en droit, University of Strasbourg, France. Specialized studies (political sciences and constitutional law) in the Center for Constitutional Studies, Madrid. Former Alternate Representative to the United Nations (Geneva). Former Legal Director, Ministry for Foreign Affairs (San Jose, C. Rica). Professor at the University of Costa Rica since 1984. Publications in the field of international and constitutional law. Former Viceminister of Interior, Costa Rica.

 

Philip Reichel is Emeritus Professor in both Criminal Justice and Sociology at the University of Northern Colorado and Adjunct Professor at the University of New Hampshire Law School. He also serves as the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences’ NGO Alternate Representative to the United Nations. During his more than 40 years in academia, he has received awards for teaching, advising, service, and scholarship. Especially notable among those were his selection as his university’s Distinguished Scholar in 2003 and his selection in 2005 by the student council as Advisor of the Year. Professor Reichel is the author of Comparative Criminal Justice Systems: A Topical Approach, coeditor of the Handbook of Transnational Crime and Justice, coauthor of Corrections, and coeditor of Human Trafficking: Exploring the International Nature, Concerns, and Complexities. In addition, he has authored or co-authored more than thirty articles and book chapters. He has provided guest lectures at universities in Austria, Germany, and Poland, participated in a panel for the United Nations University, presented papers at side-events during the United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (Brazil) and the United Nations Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (Vienna), and was an invited speaker at Zhejiang Police College in Hangzhou, China. He remains active in his retirement by providing service to professional organizations, continuing to update his existing textbooks, and taking on new writing projects.

Dr. Rolain Borel is an Emeritus Professor at the Department of Environment and Development at UPEACE.

Dr. Borel worked at UPEACE for 23 years, first as a volunteer, implementing research and training activities in environmental conflict management and as an international consultant for bilateral cooperation agencies and from 2001 to 2011 as a full time faculty and Head of the Department. Born and raised in Switzerland, Dr. Borel is married and father of three (and proud grand father of one); he has made Costa Rica his residence home for more than 30 years.

Instructor, Liason, Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Specialization and Editor, Peace and Conflict Monitor and Peace and Conflict Review Ross Ryan holds degrees in political science and literature from McMaster University, Canada and the M.A. degree in environmental security from the University for Peace, Costa Rica. He is chief editor of the Peace and Conflict Monitor and managing editor of the Peace and Conflict Review, as well as instructor in the department of peace studies and liaison officer of the media, peace and conflict studies specialization. He is currently working on a research project entitled “Information Technology, Civic Engagement, and the Cyber-Ethnography of Peace Movements”.

Saumava Mitra is a PhD candidate at University of Western Ontario, Canada. His research interest is in understanding the nuances of the role visuals play in conflict and crises news. His current primary research focus is on photojournalism in Afghanistan in the contexts of the post-conflict reconstruction in the country as well as the socio-historical distrust of the visual medium in Afghan society. His research publications have explored the discursive context of news visuals and their relationship to positive depiction of war-torn societies and an overarching typology of media initiatives which aim for peace in post-conflict societies. His most recent publication develops a critical framework to understand particular socio-cultural contexts of different post-conflict societies to see the applicability and acceptability of Peace Journalism practices in such places. Before taking up his doctoral position, he was an independent researcher and lecturer at the United Nations mandated University for Peace in Costa Rica. He has also worked as a journalist and communication consultant in India, Netherlands, Tanzania and Kenya for organizations like Associated Press, Bloomberg and Radio Netherlands. He was recipient of an Erasmus Mundus scholarship from the European Union during his Master’s studies in Journalism with a specialization in conflict reporting.

Distinguished Professor, Head, Dept. of Peace and Conflict Studies and Coordinator, International Peace Studies Programme
Dr. Toh Swee-Hin (S. H. Toh) is Distinguished Professor and a long-term consultant to the Office of the Rector at the University for Peace, where he teaches in peace education, gender and peace building, and international peace studies. He holds a MEd. and a Ph.D. from the University of Alberta, Canada. He served as Director of the Centre for International Education & Development (University of Alberta) and the Multi-Faith Centre (Griffith University). Born in Malaysia, Dr. Toh has been extensively involved in education, research and action for a culture of peace, non-violence, human rights, gender equality, local/global justice, intercultural understanding, sustainability and interfaith dialogue in global South and North contexts. His international networks or consultancies include UNESCO, the International Institute on Peace Education, World Council for Curriculum & Instruction, UNESCO-affiliated Asia-Pacific Centre of Education for International Understanding, Peace Education Commission- International Peace Research Association, the Parliament of the World’s Religions and Religions for Peace. In 2000, he was awarded the UNESCO Prize for Peace Education.

Urbano Fra Paleo, B.A. Hons. Geography (Santiago de Compostela), Ph.D. Geography (Santiago de Compostela, 1996), also holds a Diploma in Environmental Engineering from the EOI Business School and is a certified Geomatics Specialist (GIS/LIS).

Urbano Fra is Professor in Human Geography at the University of Extremadura in Spain, currently on leave at the Land Laboratory (LaboraTe) of the University of Santiago de Compostela since 2007. He is Visiting Professor at the University for Peace (UPEACE), Costa Rica. He worked at the US Geological Survey in Denver (1995) and Hawai’i (1999), and was Research Associate at The Environment Institute of the University of Denver (1996). In 2005 he was Fellow of the American Geographical Society Library of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
 
Dr. Fra has performed fieldwork in the United States, Mexico and Morocco, and taught at the University of Köln, Germany (2003), University of Marburg, Germany, (2002), University of Iceland, Iceland (2001) and Fachhochschule Neubrandenburg, Germany (1997). His research interests lie in risk governance, particularly the development of criteria and methods to perform collaborative evaluation. His research is also focused on the analysis of strategies of mitigation and adaptation to risk from natural hazards.
 
His most recent works include the editing of the books Building safer communities. Governance, spatial planning, and responses to natural hazards (IOS Press, 2009), and Riesgos naturales en Galicia El encuentro entre naturaleza y sociedad (University of Santiago de Compostela Press, 2010), a review of the interaction between natural hazards and societal processes in northwestern Spain. He currently is editing the book Risk governance: The articulation of hazard, politics and ecology for Springer. Urbano Fra has been involved in the European Virtual Seminar on sustainable development through a European-wide university partnership. He is a member of the group that is developing the evaluation tool AISHE 2.0, contributing with criteria and methods for the evaluation of sustainability in higher education.
 
He currently is member of the Spanish Scientific Committee of International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change (IHDP), of the Scientific Committee of the Integrated Risk Governance (IRG) Project, of the Disaster Risk Reduction Thematic Group, Commission on Ecosystem Management, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), project associate of the Project Urbanization and Global Environmental Change (UGEC), and is Senior Research Fellow of the IHDP Earth System Governance.
 
In 2009 Urbano Fra received the Innovation Award from the University of Santiago de Compostela, and the same year was honored with the Sustainable Actions in Social Entrepreneurship Award from the University of Santiago de Compostela and the Jaime Vera Foundation for distinguished contributions in introducing young students to science research.
 
He serves on the editorial board of the Chinese Geographical Science Journal.

Valentina Volpe is a Senior Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative Public and International Law (MPIL) in Heidelberg (Germany) and is an Associate Lecturer at the Lille Catholic University (campus of Paris) and LUISS Guido Carli University of Rome. She holds a PhD in Law and Legal Theory from the Italian Institute of Human Sciences (SUM) of Naples (today Scuola Normale Superiore of Pisa) and is a former Visiting Researcher at the Yale Law School. Before joining the MPIL she worked as a project manager for a grassroots NGO in the areas of international cooperation and human rights protection. She has been lecturing in Italy, Germany, France and China.

 

Her areas of interest include global and international public law, comparative constitutional law, democracy promotion, human rights and international organisations.

 

 

 

Professor and Coordinator, Peace Education Programme
Dr. Virginia Cawagas holds an Ed.D. (Peace & Development) (meritisimus), MS in Educational Management and BS in Education (Mathematics). Her publications and contribution to the development of peace education curriculum, training modules and instructional materials is widely recognized. She has taught and facilitated workshops in peace education, development education, social justice education, multicultural education, and gender mainstreaming in curriculum development and policy making. She has long been involved in major transnational networks in peace education such as the International Institute in Peace Education (IIPE), the Peace Education Commission of the International Peace Research Association (IPRA), and the World Council for Curriculum and Instruction (WCCI).

Ariadne Collins is at the ending phases of her doctoral research on forest governance and conservation, particularly on the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) mechanism in Guyana and Suriname. In 2014, she worked with the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) offices in the REDD+ participating countries of Guyana and Suriname on the mechanism’s implementation, preparing a report on the progress of Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) initiatives across the Guiana Shield for the Guiana Shield Facility of the UNDP Guyana, and participating in REDD+ preparation efforts in Suriname through the UNDP office there. Prior to commencing work on REDD+, she was attached for two years to the UWI-CARICOM Project of the Caribbean’s regional integrating body, the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Secretariat, based in Guyana. She has also held brief supportive roles at Democracy Program of The Carter Center in Atlanta, Georgia; and at the environmental policy think-tank of Green Alliance in London, UK. Ariadne currently holds a Masters in Research (MRes) in International Environmental Policy and Politics (Distinction) from the University of Westminster, London and a Bachelor's degree in International Relations (Honours) from the University of Guyana.
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