Academic Course Calendar - Gender and Peace Building - 2017 - 2018

Courses and Teachers
2017 - 2018 - Gender and Peace Building
Course listings are continously updated with new information
Courses Teacher Credits # Weeks Dates
UPEACE Foundation Course
Mandatory
Alonso Muñoz
(Costa Rica)
Heather Kertyzia
(Canada)
Jan Breitling
(Germany)
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
Mayumi Yamada
(Japan)
Mihir Kanade
(India)
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
21 Aug-08 Sep 2017
8:45am - 11:45am At Council Room
Gender Theories and Practices
Mandatory
Gal Harmat
(Israel)
3 credits
3 weeks (NOTE: One double session on Friday 22 September from 8:45 a.m.-4:15 p.m.)
18 Sep-06 Oct 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #3
The United Nations System and UPMUNC (Part I)
Mandatory
José Riera-Cézanne
(United States)
Mihir Kanade
(India)
2 credits
2 weeks
11-25 Oct 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Gender in Peace Building and Human Security
Mandatory
Urooj Mian
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
30 Oct-17 Nov 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #1
Gender, Environment and Sustainable Development
Mandatory
Mayumi Yamada
(Japan)
3 credits
2 weeks (including five double sessions -Dates TBC- 8:45 a.m.-4:15 p.m.)
20 Nov-01 Dec 2017
8:45 a.m. - 4:15 p.m. At Classroom #3
The Kurds between Past and Present Genocides in Iraq: Fresh Hopes or New Tragedies?
Optional
Mohammed Ihsan

2 credits
2 weeks
15-26 Jan 2018
At Classroom #3
Gender Mainstreaming in Peacekeeping Operations and in Humanitarian Assistance
Mandatory
Mayumi Yamada
(Japan)
3 credits
3 weeks
15 Jan-02 Feb 2018
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #1
Tools for Conflict Resolution and Transformation
Mandatory
Balázs Kovács
(Hungary)
3 credits
3 weeks
7-27 Feb 2018
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Research Methodology
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
5-23 Mar 2018
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Gender and Media
Mandatory
Heather Kertyzia
(Canada)
2 credits
2 weeks
2-13 Apr 2018
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #2
Working in Conflict and Post-Conflict Areas - Field Training
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
2 credits
1 week
16-20 Apr 2018
8:45 a.m. - 4:15 p.m. At Council Room
Gender and people on the move: Trafficking, Refugees, Asylum Seekers and Migration
Mandatory
Adriana Salcedo
(United States)
3 credits
3 weeks
2-22 May 2018
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #3
The United Nations System and UPMUNC (Part II)
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
1 credits
1 weeks
28-30 May 2018
8:45 a.m. - 4:15 p.m. At Council Room
Identity Politics, Inclusion and Peace Building
Mandatory
Heather Kertyzia
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
4-22 Jun 2018
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #2
Graduation Project: Thesis (8 credits) or Internship (8 credits) or Capstone (5 credits)
Mandatory
UPEACE Resident Faculty

8 credits
-
25 Jun-31 Dec 2018
Research Methodology (I Part)
Mandatory
UPEACE Resident Faculty

1 credits
1 week
26-30 Nov 2018
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room



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COURSE DESCRIPTION

The UPEACE Foundation Course provides a critical and concise introduction to the broad field of “Peace Studies” for students in ALL UPEACE programs. It initially addresses key conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of the origins and development of peace studies as an interdisciplinary area within the fields of international relations and political economy. Based on a critical analysis of policies, strategies, institutions, organizations and movements, the course then examines a range of core issues, dimensions, perspectives and paradigms for understanding the root causes of conflicts and violence and constructive strategies to address them and build peace in contemporary global, international, regional, national and local contexts. The core concepts include militarization, disarmament and arms control; human rights violations and promotion; gender inequalities, gender-based violence and gender mainstreaming; structural violence, human security, development and globalization; environmental sustainability; corporate social responsibility; international law in conflict and peacebuilding; cultural and religious identities; media’s role in conflict and peacebuilding; strategies of nonviolence; and peace education. This Foundations course will be essential in catalyzing the awareness, understanding and motivation of UPEACE students in diverse academic programs to relate, ground and intersect their specific areas of academic and practitioner interest with core theoretical, conceptual and analytical ideas in peace studies.

This course intends to familiarize students with diverse gender theories and systems of domination and oppression. The course explores the central tenets and critiques of the main debates in feminism. The course will introduce the students to various conceptual and theoretical frameworks within feminism, honoring women’s agency and active participation. The course will stimulate critical thinking while providing an understanding of the processes involved in gender discrimination and oppression. Students will explore different frameworks for analyzing the differential impacts of power imbalances. This course will allow students to become familiarized with the central theories and frameworks within feminism and understand some of the core mechanisms that instill and perpetuate oppression. The course will cover the intersection of oppressed identities such as race, ethnicity, and sexual orientation, among others; and it will explore some of the mechanisms that create and perpetuate social inequality, such as privilege, structural oppression, gender stereotyping, socialization, discrimination, stigma and microaggression. The course will explore gender imbalance beyond victimhood to discuss women’s agency, as well as the role of feminism in creating social change.

The pursuit of an elusive peace for humanity has been one of the major driving forces for the establishment of international organisations throughout History. The struggled for maintenance of peace and peaceful settlement of disputes have been the most important aim of most Humanity. Two world wars have been needed, however, to institute finally an international organisation committed itself essentially “to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small, to establish conditions under which justice and respect for the obligations arising from treaties and other sources of international law can be maintained, and to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom”  The United Nations emerged in 1945 as a stronger and wiser international organisation resolved to avoid the circumstances that led to the failure of its predecessor, the League of Nations.

After 70 years of its foundation, the historical, socio-political and economic development circumstances of the world have changed and with them, the UN has evolved towards a contemporary new architecture reflected in the adoption of an organisational philosophy able to respond to the current necessities of the world particularly on the subjects related to pacific settlement, collective security and development. One of the most important changes relates to the new criteria about Peace. In the world of former UN Secretary General Ban Ki Mon “Building peace is about much more than ending war. It is about putting in place the institutions and trust that will carry people forward into a peaceful future. We often have a limited window of opportunity in which to do this.”

This course constitutes an advanced seminar in Gender Studies specifically as it applies to peace building, violence, conflict creation and resolution. It examines the complex relationships between gender(s), race, ethnicity, nationalism, religion, militarization and masculinities-femininities both in the domestic and the public spheres. The entire focus of the course is in assessing the possibilities of engendering, from a   power dynamics perspective, notions of peace, security conflict, justice, reconstruction, reparations, pre-post conflict gender arrangements and in challenging discourses and practices which invisibilize, minimize or justify the domination of women worldwide. It intends to give students a theoretical lens from which to examine Gender and Peace Building. The course also examines Gender equality as a prerequisite for Human Security as it allows for the capture of its socio-cultural dimension and strengthens the contributions to Peace Education. The course will also clarify education as a system involved in maintaining gender inequality. In addition, exemplars will be provided of how a critical and transformative education paradigm is essential in overcoming patriarchy and thereby contribute to the goals of peace building.

Based on theories and experiences from diverse cultural contexts, this course will provide students with a holistic and critical understanding of the linkages between gender, sustainable development, environment, and classic economic approaches. The notion of “development” itself will be critically analysed. The inequality between women’s and men’s access to and ownership of resources, along with power differentials in decision-making will be considered. Students will then focus on a more gender inclusive, eco-feminist model for participatory action. This directs the focus to issues of environmental justice, corporate and social responsibility and ethics, while raising questions about current strategies. The course also makes visible the differential impacts of global warming , climate change and scarcity of resources given that already women are the poorest in the planet an yet they are pivotal actors for survival and change.

This course introduces students to the struggles of Kurds in the context of genocides committed against
them in the past as well as in the current ongoing conflict against ISIS. It explores the Kurdish national
movement  and  its  prospects  and  challenges.  At  the  end  of  the  course,  the  students  will  have  an understanding of the history of the Kurds in the Middle East with specific emphasis on the Kurds of Iraq from the birth of Kurdish nationalism to the present day. The first session will offer an overview of the history of the Kurds and their relation with the succeeding Iraqi governments. The second session will cover the history of genocides in Iraq against the Kurds and other minorities exploring the causes and the consequences for the political and social stability of the area. The third session will focus on the heritage that this culture of violence has created in the area and the genocides committed by ISIS. The fourth session will discuss the future of Iraq and the Kurds in the context of the Middle East. The last session will explore which is the future of Iraq as a country after the liberation of Mosul and the new balance of power born from the end of the war with ISIS and the definitive collapse of the order established in 1916 with the Sykes-Picot Agreement.

This course is designed to provide theoretical as well as field-based knowledge on the gender dimensions of peacekeeping and humanitarian assistance. Throughout the three weeks, the students will be exposed to the major trends that have been used for the integration of a gender perspective in peacekeeping and humanitarian fields. Students will critically examine the theories and policies that underpin programming to gain a thorough understanding of gender integration as an essential element in the delivery of effective programming in peacekeeping and humanitarian assistance. Students will also learn from the on-the-ground experience and knowledge of practitioners on how these theories and policies are put into practice in the field. At the end of the three-week course, the students shall have a deeper understanding and overview of the theory and praxis of gender mainstreaming in peacekeeping operations and humanitarian assistance as well as the ability to analyse any current situation from a gender perspective.

Designed as an advanced workshop, this course provides a conceptual, theoretical and analytical understanding of, as well as practical skills in conflict analysis, negotiation, resolution and transformation essential in peacebuilding within and between states. Drawing on examples of complex conflicts involving nation-states, non-state groups, communities and citizens, students will examine various frameworks and tools for analyzing those conflicts, including the drivers, processes of escalation and conditions for de-escalation. The course will also provide basic knowledge, tools and skills in the vital strategy of negotiation in managing and resolving conflicts. It focuses on how the process of conducting diplomatic negotiations and other informal processes aimed at managing inter-state and intra-state conflicts have an impact on the outcomes of those conflicts, laying the foundations for outcomes ranging from stable peace to further escalation of violence. The workshop will also introduce students to various types and strategies of mediation as an important means of alternative conflict or dispute resolution. In the concluding sessions, students will examine the differences between conflict resolution and conflict transformation which focuses especially on addressing the root causes of conflicts, transforming and building long-term relationships with grassroots and community empowerment and fostering reconciliation.

The central goal of this course is to provide the students with a critical understanding of research methodologies used in the social sciences, particularly those that are relevant to peace and conflict studies and peace-building. Students will also get an introduction into the field of peace education as a tool for various research fields in peace studies. Initially, students will explore conceptual and theoretical perspectives underlying various paradigms in research methodology, including modern and post-modern as well as quantitative and qualitative approaches. Informed by post-positivist concerns, the course will raise students’ awareness of their relational and ethical position vis-à-vis their research. Drawing on examples of studies in diverse conflict and peacebuilding contexts, students will also be introduced to the design and conduct of a research study including a range of specific research methods such as surveys, interviews, content analysis, case-studies, participatory action research, evaluation research, ethnography, and feminist and indigenous approaches. The orientation, process and potential of these approaches to enact change towards social justice will be examined. Drawing from several exemplars, some ethical considerations, accountability, strengths and limitations for making a difference in terms of social justice will also be discussed. Throughout the research process, ethical issues will be emphasised, especially gender equity and rights of subordinated groups.

As we have established in previous courses, media (in both its traditional and “new” forms) shapes our past, present, and future, and contributes in significant ways to the escalation of conflict and to practices of peace building. Here, we emphasize the gendered aspects of these processes.

In this course, we approach the media as a space for the negotiation of gendered identities, and interrogate the politics of representation from a multi-cultural and trans-disciplinary perspective. Our gender-focused analysis will address both the content of media messaging, and the wider social context of media production, activism, and advocacy. The agency of women in the media industry and the integration of gender in media NGOs will be considered in detail. Throughout the course, students are encouraged to engage with feminist critiques of media and communication studies, and to add their voices to contemporary debates on media, power, and gender.

Media is both an influential tool of socio-political and structural change, and an authoritative force for maintaining the status quo, and it is therefore essential to understand the full implications of its gendered dimensions.

This course is intended as a practical field exercise in conflict situations, as well as an academic seminar. The students will receive a basic training on how situations of stress or crisis influence them in a mental, physical, and professional ways. A series of scenarios drawn from contemporary conflict situations are presented to the participants as they simulate the work of journalists, NGO personnel and members of international organisations.

Contemporary gendered trafficking in persons for sexual exploitation and force labour, has been radically increasing and has become of the mayor economic enterprises worldwide. This course will focus on the structural factors interacting with gender inequality, such as other discriminatory practices, poverty, globalization, demand for prostitutes and sex tourism focusing on children, and the related issues of internally displaced individuals, migration and refugees. Women and children are highly represented among these populations. Additionally, proximate factors such as corruption, impunity, increased technological advances, lack of political will contribute to the understanding of sources  of this growing exploitation of vulnerable individuals. The course will also include a focus on international and national efforts to prevent, protect and punish human trafficking and manners in which to assess the effectiveness of these measures, as well as to   consider future challenges.

The UPEACE Model United Nations Conference (UPMUNC) is a graduate-level simulation of the real United Nations Organization, its most important specialized agencies, and other associated organizations. UPMUNC provides a common platform for UPEACE students and participants from several other universities to discuss international affairs and to gain a greater understanding of the procedures of the United Nations. Participants become familiar with key global issues by becoming part of the international decision making process to resolve them, and in so doing, are given an opportunity to apply their skills in negotiations, public speaking, and diplomacy.

This course will the complexity of genders, ethnicities races, sexual orientations, religions and their intersectionlity in contemporary peace keeping and peace building work. The course aims to deal with practical and theoretical aspects of identity and its effect on peace building and keeping in the field of conflict transformation and prevention. While notions of Hegemonic masculinies and feminities are questioning what constitute gender vs sex. The course will explore contemporary concepts that attempt to bridge conflicting identities and politicize the process of identity fluidity and development.

The Graduation Project is a concluding academic requirement intended to be a comprehensive and capstone outcome of the student educational performance. It is a higher academic exercise that enables the student to demonstrate the ability to identify a problem, determine an academic objective to address it and utilize an appropriate methodology to attain such objective. The Graduation Project is also intended to demonstrate the student’s ability to write and critically develop a professional and scholarly report. The Graduation Project can be fulfilled through one of the following modalities:

  • Thesis: 8 credits
  • Internship: 8 credits (3 months)
  • Capstone: 5 credits*

Graduation Project Guidelines with detail information of each modality will be provided by your Academic Department.

*NOTE: Students who choose Capstone as Graduation Project must take an extra 3-credit course according the following options:

  • One additional course (face to face modality), which means taking 2 parallel regular master courses (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) if approved by the student's MA Programme Coordinator
  • One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality), which means taking 2 or 3 parallel courses (one face-to-face master course and one 3 credit course or two 2-credit courses approved by the student's Programme Coordinator) before June 2018
  • One additional 3-credit course or two additional 2-credit courses (online modality) extended from June 2018 until December 2018 (the online course or courses must be approved by the student's Programme Coordinator)

The central goal of this course is to provide the students with a critical understanding of research methodologies used in the social sciences, particularly those that are relevant to peace and conflict studies and peace-building. Students will also get an introduction into the field of peace education as a tool for various research fields in peace studies. Initially, students will explore conceptual and theoretical perspectives underlying various paradigms in research methodology, including modern and post-modern as well as quantitative and qualitative approaches. Informed by post-positivist concerns, the course will raise students’ awareness of their relational and ethical position vis-à-vis their research. Drawing on examples of studies in diverse conflict and peacebuilding contexts, students will also be introduced to the design and conduct of a research study including a range of specific research methods such as surveys, interviews, content analysis, case-studies, participatory action research, evaluation research, ethnography, and feminist and indigenous approaches. The orientation, process and potential of these approaches to enact change towards social justice will be examined. Drawing from several exemplars, some ethical considerations, accountability, strengths and limitations for making a difference in terms of social justice will also be discussed. Throughout the research process, ethical issues will be emphasised, especially gender equity and rights of subordinated groups.



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FACULTY

Adriana Salcedo is an anthropologist focusing on conflict analysis, identity, migration and peacebuilding. She holds a Doctorate in Conflict Analysis and Resolution from George Mason University, in Virginia, United States, for which she conducted extensive research on forced migration, human rights and conflict in the Colombian-Ecuadorian borderlands and inner cities in Ecuador. With more than twelve years of experience in the analyzing social conflicts, her professional practice covers the Amazon basin, the Galapagos Islands and the Andean region (Ecuador, Colombia and Bolivia), the United States and the Dominican Republic. She has researched for and worked with various public, private and civil society institutions, including international organizations, NGOs, etc., as well as grass-roots organizations, including indigenous communities, women and minority groups (e.g. LGBT organizations). In the academic field, she has taught courses at the Simón Bolívar Andean University, at the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO) in Quito, Ecuador and at George Mason University in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area on conflict analysis, participatory methodologies for building peace, and human rights and conflict. She has several publications in indexed books and journals in English and Spanish, exploring issues of human displacement, conflict, migrant s’ rights and their link to public policies. Additionally, she has conducted numerous training courses and seminars for the Northern Virginia Mediation Center (as a Certified Instructor/Mediator), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the Ministry of Education of the Dominican Republic (DR) and the Canadian Embassy in the DR. She is fluent in English and Spanish, and possesses a good command of Portuguese, French and Quichua. She has traveled extensively in the Latin America and the Caribbean region, as well as in North America, Asia and Europe.
Alonso Muñoz is Instructor in the Department of Environment and Development at the University for Peace, where he coordinates the Master of Arts (MA) degree in Responsible Management and Sustainable Economic Development (RMSED). He holds a BSc. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Costa Rica and a Msc. in Business Administration. He has worked in the private sector as a consultant and as an entrepreneur, and has volunteered on various national and international projects regarding peace education, migration, environmental impact of systems and Social Enterprises. He is a novelist, a blogger, a peace advocate, an entrepreneur and passionate about social and environmental development.

Balázs Áron Kovács currently serves as the programme manager of forumZFD, a German NGO working in the field of conflict transformation. He is in charge of forumZFD’s programme in the Philippines. Earlier he taught international relations at Webster University Thailand and peace and conflict studies at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace in Costa Rica and the Philippines. Balazs received his PhD degree in 2017 from the University of New England, Australia, in peace studies/politics and international studies. His research focuses on local-level peace-building, state theory, and state-society interactions of the violent kind.

Dr. Gal Harmat holds a PhD in Gender Analysis of Peace Education and Dialogue encounters from Nitra University (Slovakia) and a M.A. in Gender and Peacebuilding from the UN-Mandated University for Peace in Costa Rica. She was a professor in conflict transformation, peace education and gender and Co-Director of the Social Justice and Peace Education Teachers Training Program, Kibbutzim Teachers College in Tel Aviv, Israel. She has also been teaching in the World Peace Academy (University of Basel), the European Peace University (Austria), and the Arts and Social Change College in Israel. As a Gender and Peacebuilding Specialist, she has extensive experience in training, conflict analysis, dialogue facilitation, capacity building, peace education, research, gender empowerment and gender mainstreaming since 1998 in various countries in Eastern Europe, Africa, and West and South East Asia. Her consultancies include intergovernmental organizations (e.g. OSCE, UN Women, UNDP, and the Council of Europe), various international and regional NGOs (e.g. Non Violent Peace Force, Friends of the Earth Middle East; Peres Centre for Peace) and corporate donors (e.g. United Bank of Switzerland; Optimus Foundation).

Resident Professor and Academic Coordinator of Peace Education Programme
Heather Kertyzia is currently Resident Professor and Academic Coordinator of Peace Education Master Programme at the University for Peace. She is also an assistant professor of Negotiation, Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding at California State University Dominguez Hills. She focuses on peace education, working with teachers in participatory action research to create more peaceful secondary schools. As a former secondary school teacher, Heather understands the importance of the local community in building more socially, economically and environmentally just educational spaces. As an interdisciplinary student and scholar, she has worked with communities throughout the Americas, with a recent focus on partnering with local grassroots organizations in Nicaragua.

Jan Breitling is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environment and Development at University for Peace. He holds a BSc. in Tropical Forestry, from the Technological Institute of Costa Rica, and a MSc. in Environmental Sciences from WUR Wageningen University and Research Center, The Netherlands. His research interests include root causes of deforestation and Global Environmental Change, and Environmental Governance, specifically market based approaches addressing biodiversity conservation and Climate Change.
Professor José Riera-Cézanne is Adjunct Professor in the Department of International Law at UPEACE as well as an international consultant (United Nations and non-governmental organizations). He joined UPEACE in 2017 following 32 years of distinguished service with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), most recently as Special Adviser to the Assistant UN High Commissioner for Refugees (Protection), Mr. Volker Türk. Professor Riera-Cézanne is a seasoned expert in multilateral consultations and negotiations relating to refugees and other populations who are of concern to UNHCR and to the United Nations, as well humanitarian issues more broadly. He brings to UPAZ his in-depth knowledge of international refugee law and protection issues; international humanitarian law and norms relating to the protection of the world’s growing number of internally displaced persons; international law relating to statelessness and nationality; human rights law; international migration and efforts to improve global governance of international migration and refugee flows; international migration and human rights; comprehensive refugee response frameworks as called for in the United Nations General Assembly’s New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants of 2016; climate change and its ramifications for migration, displacement and planned relocation of affected populations; humanitarian accountability; evaluations of humanitarian assistance; fund raising from Governments, Foundations and others; and the UN’s cooperation with faith-based actors in development and humanitarian interventions. Professor Riera-Cézanne holds degrees from Yale College (BA cum laude, SY ’77), Columbia Law School (JD ’81), the Parker School of Foreign and International Law (Certificate in Foreign and International Law ‘81). He has also worked towards a doctorate from the Graduate Institute in Geneva, Switzerland, and studied at The Hague Academy of International Law (Private international law and Public international law). His principal area of academic research is documenting the impacts of climate change on human mobility and identifying effective adaptation strategies and State policies to promote them. He has lectured in a number of universities over the years, including the NATO School, (Germany) the University of Washington (USA) and the University of Groningen (Neth.). Lectures and presentations Contribution to the United Nations Global Compact on Refugees: Lessons from the 1989 International Conference on Refugees in Central America (CIREFCA), UNHCR-organized meeting on “Towards a global compact on refugees”, Thematic discussion 1 on Past and current burden- and responsibility-sharing arrangements, Palais des Nations, Geneva, 10 July 2017 Recent Developments in International Governance of International Migration and Refugee Flows: The New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants, Lecture at the University of Washington, Faculty of Geography and Migration, 27 February 2017 (Unpublished – available upon request) The UN’s Cooperation with Faith-based Actors: Recent Developments, Lecture at the University of Washington, Faculty of Geography and Migration, 27 February 2017 (Unpublished – available upon request)

Head, Dept. of Peace and Conflict Studies, Resident Professor and Academic Coordinator of International Peace Studies Programme and International Peace Studies with specialization in Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Programme
Dr. Manish Thapa is Head of the Department of Peace and Conflict Studies and Resident Professor of International Peace Studies Master Programme at the University for Peace. He is one of the founding members of Department of Conflict, Peace & Development Studies at Tribhuvan University Nepal (2007-2015). He is also currently Visiting Professor at the Institute of International Relations, University of Warsaw, Poland and Senior Research Fellow at Center for Europe – University of Warsaw- Poland. He received his Post Doctorate in International Relations from the University of Warsaw. He has served as Research Fellow in several universities and institutes in Europe and North America such as the University of Warsaw; Department of Peace & Conflict Research, Uppsala University; Brown University; McGill-Echenberg Human Rights Fellow & Jeanne Sauvé Scholar, McGill University; Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame. His publications include 6 books and numerous journal articles and book chapters including "Foreign Policy in the Global South: Anti-Westernism, Rhetoric and Identity" (Co-editor), London: Routledge 2017 (Forthcoming - In Press); "From Bullet to Ballot – Peacemaking and Peacebuilding in Nepal: Lessons Learned and Unlearned" (Editor), London: Routledge 2017 (Proposal accepted); “Internal Conflicts & Peacebuilding Challenges" (Editor), New Delhi: K W Publishers 2016 and "India in the Contemporary World: Polity, Economy and International Relations" (Co-editor), London: Routledge 2014.

Mayumi Yamada (Ph.D.).
Resident Professor and Head of Doctoral Programme

Dr. Mayumi Yamada is Resident Professor and Head of the Doctoral Programme of the UN Mandated University for Peace (UPEACE) in Costa Rica. Prior to joining UPEACE, she worked as the Recovery, Reintegration & Peace Building Officer of United Nations Mission in South Sudan. During the December Crisis 2013 in South Sudan, she remained as a life-saving staff, directly managing one of the biggest Protection of Civilians sites by supporting humanitarian assistance. Before joining UNMISS, she worked with UNDP Offices in Kazakhstan (Semipalatinsk: ex-nuclear testing sites), Maldives, Lao PDR and Solomon Islands, and the UN Centre for Regional Development (Disaster Management Planning Unit). She holds a Ph.D. Degree in Sustainable Development from Imperial College London, UK. She is originally from Kobe (Japan), who survived from the Great Hanshin- Awaji Earthquake in 1995.

Dr. Mihir Kanade (India) is the Academic Coordinator of UPEACE, the Head of its Department of International Law, and the Director of the UPEACE Human Rights Centre. He holds an LL.B. from Nagpur University (India) and a Master degree and Doctorate from UPEACE. He is also an adjunct faculty at Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio (Spain), Cheikh Anta Diop University (Senegal), and Long Island University (United States). His principal area of academic research and study is International Law, Human Rights and Globalization, covering several themes within that interface including trade and investment, sustainable development, forced migration, indigenous peoples’ rights, public health, amongst others. He has extensive experience in training staff of inter-governmental, governmental and non-governmental organizations, as well as professionals, in the field of human rights. He acts as an advisor to several human rights organizations and corporations on issues related to international law and human rights. He serves on the International Advisory Board of the International Bar Association on the topic of Business and Human Rights. He also leads a project of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on promoting the Right to Development. Prior to his pursuit in academia, Mihir practiced for several years as a lawyer at the Bombay High Court and at the Supreme Court of India.
Dr. Miriam Estrada-Castillo (Ecuador) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of International Law. Prior to joining UPEACE, Dr. Estrada-Castillo worked as the Senior legal and political officer in the United Nations Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED). Prior to that position, she has worked with the UN system in various capacities, including as the International Prosecutor General, UN Peacekeeping Mission for East-Timor (DPKO), Expert and Vice-Chairperson of the Monitoring Committee of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), Chief of Field of the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, and the Latin America Regional Adviser on Gender, Human Rights and Culture of Peace for UNESCO. She has also worked as the President of the Ecuadorian Supreme Court of Juvenile Justice and as the Minister of Social Affairs in Ecuador. In her academic life, she worked recently as the Director of Master Degree Courses on Gender and the Law and Children in Armed Conflict, Lund University, Sweden. She is a Visiting Professor of the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law (RWI) and has also taught courses as a Visiting Professor at the Australian National University. She is the author of the Ecuadorian Law on Violence against Women and of the first Legislation for Minors and Family in the country.

Instructor, Liason, Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Specialization and Editor, Peace and Conflict Monitor and Peace and Conflict Review Ross Ryan holds degrees in political science and literature from McMaster University, Canada and the M.A. degree in environmental security from the University for Peace, Costa Rica. He is chief editor of the Peace and Conflict Monitor and managing editor of the Peace and Conflict Review, as well as instructor in the department of peace studies and liaison officer of the media, peace and conflict studies specialization. He is currently working on a research project entitled “Information Technology, Civic Engagement, and the Cyber-Ethnography of Peace Movements”.

Urooj Mian holds a Master in Social Science (M.Sc) in Peace and Conflict Research, Uppsala University, a Master in Law (LL.M) International Crime and Justice from the UN Interregional Crime Research Institute (UNICRI) and University of Torino and a Bachelor of Public Affairs and Policy Management (B.PAPM) specializing in Human Rights and Law, Carleton University. She has field experience in development and post-conflict working in South Asia and Africa. She worked for over 9 years with the Government of Canada as a strategic advisor in policy and programming working with newcomer and refugee issues. From 2014-2016 she was the founding Executive Director of Women in International Security (WIIS) Canada, a federal not-for-profit. Ms Mian has contributed as a gender expert with Global Affairs Canada (GAC) advising on Canada’s Humanitarian Policy and has guest lectured at York University on the issue. Most recently, she led an exclusive strategic session with Parliamentarians, providing legal expertise on the crimes of genocide and crimes against humanity, for Canada’s strategic plan revitalization. She was also invited by the Italian G7 Presidency to input on gender, security and migration at an international meeting held in collaboration with Italy’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation in Rome. Ms. Mian is engaged this year as Canada is re-writing its National Action Plan on UNSCR 1325 and also serves as an expert advising on Canada’s inputs at the Human Rights Council. Committed to enacting solid impact in the areas of gender, justice and security worldwide, she is the founding CEO of Sustainable Human Empowerment (SHE Associates) Inc.
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