Academic Course Calendar

Courses and Teachers
From October 2017 To October 2017
FROM TO
Course listings are continously updated with new information
Courses Teacher Credits # Weeks Dates
Métodos de Investigación (2 créditos)
Mandatory
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
2 credits
2 weeks
2-10 Oct 2017
8:45am - 11:45am At Classroom #5
Fundamentos de Ambiente y Desarrollo
Mandatory
Alonso Muñoz
(Costa Rica)
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks: Incluyen dos dobles sesiones: Viernes 13 Oct 8:45am a 4:15pm; y Miercoles 18 Oct 8:45am a 4:15pm, estos dos dias en el Computer Lab.
11-27 Oct 2017
1:15pm - 4:15pm At Classroom #1
The United Nations System and UPMUNC (Part I)
Mandatory
José Riera-Cézanne
(United States)
Mihir Kanade
(India)
2 credits
2 weeks
11-25 Oct 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room



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COURSE DESCRIPTION

Desde el inicio del debate internacional sobre la necesidad de un desarrollo con responsabilidad intergeneracional, la agenda en la materia se ha complejizado en todos los aspectos, políticos, sociales, jurídicos e institucionales. El curso abordará los diversos aspectos del tema, incluido los últimos desafíos del cambio climático y el impacto diferencial sobre mujeres y hombres que este tiene. Se examinará la agenda para el 2030 del Desarrollo Sostenible acordado en New York en el 2015 por las Naciones Unidas que consolidará los Objetivos del Milenio que finalizan en el 2015 La eliminación de la pobreza y el hambre, la desigualdad en y entre países; la construcción de sociedades pacificas; la protección de los derechos humanos; la promoción la igualdad de género y asegurar a largo plazo la protección del planeta y sus recursos son centrales en esta nueva propuesta. Consolidando los Objetivos del Milenio para asegurar un futuro de Paz para la Humanidad.

The pursuit of an elusive peace for humanity has been one of the major driving forces for the establishment of international organisations throughout History. The struggled for maintenance of peace and peaceful settlement of disputes have been the most important aim of most Humanity. Two world wars have been needed, however, to institute finally an international organisation committed itself essentially “to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small, to establish conditions under which justice and respect for the obligations arising from treaties and other sources of international law can be maintained, and to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom”  The United Nations emerged in 1945 as a stronger and wiser international organisation resolved to avoid the circumstances that led to the failure of its predecessor, the League of Nations.

After 70 years of its foundation, the historical, socio-political and economic development circumstances of the world have changed and with them, the UN has evolved towards a contemporary new architecture reflected in the adoption of an organisational philosophy able to respond to the current necessities of the world particularly on the subjects related to pacific settlement, collective security and development. One of the most important changes relates to the new criteria about Peace. In the world of former UN Secretary General Ban Ki Mon “Building peace is about much more than ending war. It is about putting in place the institutions and trust that will carry people forward into a peaceful future. We often have a limited window of opportunity in which to do this.”



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FACULTY

Alonso Muñoz is Instructor in the Department of Environment and Development at the University for Peace, where he coordinates the Master of Arts (MA) degree in Responsible Management and Sustainable Economic Development (RMSED). He holds a BSc. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Costa Rica and a Msc. in Business Administration. He has worked in the private sector as a consultant and as an entrepreneur, and has volunteered on various national and international projects regarding peace education, migration, environmental impact of systems and Social Enterprises. He is a novelist, a blogger, a peace advocate, an entrepreneur and passionate about social and environmental development.
José Riera-Cézanne is Adjunct Professor in the Department of International Law at UPEACE. He has just joined the faculty after 32 years of distinguished service with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), most recently as Special Adviser to the Assistant UN High Commissioner for Refugees (Protection). Professor Riera-Cézanne is a seasoned expert in multilateral consultations and negotiations relating to refugees and other populations of concern to UNHCR, as well humanitarian issues more broadly. He brings to UPAZ his in-depth knowledge of international refugee law and protection issues; international humanitarian law and norms relating to the protection of the world’s growing number of internally displaced persons; international law relating to statelessness and nationality; human rights law; international migration and efforts to improve global governance of international migration and refugee flows; climate change and its ramifications for migration, displacement and planned relocation of affected populations; humanitarian accountability; evaluations of humanitarian assistance; and the UN’s cooperation with faith-based actors in development and humanitarian interventions. Professor Riera-Cézanne holds degrees from Yale College (BA cum laude, SY ’77), Columbia Law School (JD ’81), the Parker School of International Law (Certificate in Public International Law ‘81). He has also worked towards a doctorate from the Graduate Institute in Geneva, Switzerland, and studied at The Hague Academy of International Law (Private international law and Public international law). His principal area of academic research is documenting the impacts of climate change on human mobility and identifying effective adaptation strategies and State policies to promote them.
Dr. Kanade is the Head of the Department of International Law and Human Rights at UPEACE, and is the Director of the UPEACE Human Rights Centre. He holds a Ph.D. in Peace and Conflict Studies with a specialization in Human Rights (Multilateral Trading System and Human Rights: A Governance Space Theory on Linkages) and a Masters degree in International Law and the Settlement of Disputes from UPEACE. He also holds a LL.B. from Nagpur University, India. Prior to joining UPEACE in 2009, Mihir practiced for 6 years as a lawyer in the Supreme Court of India and the Bombay High Court, focusing on issues of fundamental human rights violations. His principal area of academic research is Globalization and Human Rights.
An ethnobiologist who researches food harvesting in Costa Rica. For the past decade her research program has focused on access to food in Costa Rican national parks. Specifically her emphasis has been on Indigenous rights to access and harvest cultural food. Olivia is a member of the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the International Society of Ethnobiology, the Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage Project, and the POLIS Project on Ecological Governance. Being active within these networks allows her to work at the interface of policy and practice regarding food harvesting and access.
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