Academic Course Calendar

Courses and Teachers
From May 2017 To August 2017
FROM TO
Course listings are continously updated with new information
Courses Teacher Credits # Weeks Dates
Mission Impossible? Measuring Outcomes and Impact (Online Course)
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
4 weeks
1-28 May 2017
Seminario Taller: Temas de la Agenda Internacional
Mandatory
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
1 credits
1 weeks
8-12 May 2017
1:15pm. - 4:15pm. At Classroom #2
Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Social Change (Online Course)
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
6 weeks
15 May-25 Jun 2017
Seminario de Investigación
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
15-31 May 2017
8:45am. - 11:45am. At Classroom #4
Religion and Violent Extremism: The Case of Terrorism in the Name of Islam
Optional
Amr Abdalla
(Egypt)
1 credits
1 week
15-19 May 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Human Vulnerability and Climate Change Adaptation
Recommended
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
17 May-06 Jun 2017
1:15 - 4:15 At Council Room
Globalization and Human Rights
Mandatory
Mihir Kanade
(India)
3 credits
3 weeks
17 May-06 Jun 2017
1:15 - 4:15 At Classroom #2
Maritime & Territorial Dispute Settlement
Mandatory
Juan Carlos Sainz-Borgo
(Venezuela)
3 credits
3 weeks
17 May-06 Jun 2017
8:45 - 11:45 At Classroom #3
Identity Politics, Inclusion and Peace Building
Mandatory
Arlinda Rrustemi
(Netherlands)
3 credits
3 weeks
17 May-06 Jun 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #2
Education in Emergencies: Armed Conflicts, Disasters and Health Crises
Mandatory
Kees Wiebering
(Netherlands)
3 credits
3 weeks
17 May-06 Jun 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #5
Social Entrepreneurship
Mandatory
Alonso Muñoz
(Costa Rica)
3 credits
3 weeks
17 May-06 Jun 2017
8:45 - 11:45 At Classroom #2
Terrorism and Conflict: Issues and Perspectives
Mandatory
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
2 credits
2 weeks
22 May-02 Jun 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Educating in Changing Times: Reflect, Rethink, Rebuild (Online Course)
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
4 weeks
29 May-25 Jun 2017
Hybrid Diploma in Social Innovation
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
18 months
5-7 Jun 2017
Positive Leadership
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
0 weeks
5-7 Jun 2017
World Politics
Mandatory
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
3 credits
9 weeks
12 Jun-11 Aug 2017
International Law Dimensions of Peace and Conflicts
Optional
Mihir Kanade
(India)
3 credits
9 weeks
12 Jun-11 Aug 2017
Trabajo de Graduación - Tesis -
Mandatory
Facultad Residente UPAZ

8 credits
8 weeks
12 Jun-31 Jul 2017
Trabajo de Graduación - Pasantía -
Mandatory
Facultad Residente UPAZ

8 credits
8 weeks
12 Jun-31 Jul 2017
Human Security
Optional
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
2 credits
6 weeks
19 Jun-28 Jul 2017
Media, Peace, and Conflict
Optional
Daniela Ingruber
(Austria)
2 credits
6 weeks
19 Jun-28 Jul 2017
Global Education: Cultivating innovation in the classroom
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
1 week
10-14 Jul 2017
Curso de Derechos Internacional Público.Parte I
Mandatory
Juan Carlos Sainz-Borgo
(Venezuela)
1 credits
1 week
21 Jul-04 Aug 2017
At Other



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COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course will cover the following topics:

  • What problem is your organization addressing, and how?
  • How can you implement a program to help you measure the impact and outputs that your organization is generating?  What tools should you be using to do so?
  • How can you institutionalize the monitoring of your organization, and use the information gathered to influence your planning, decision-making and communications in the future?

En formato de seminario, el programa revisará la agenda internacional global, presentando de forma actual los
principales desafíos a la paz y la seguridad internacional. Este análisis se centrará en el estudio de los casos
que han sido resueltos por los diferentes tribunales internacionales. Después de una breve introducción a esta
jurisprudencia, los estudiantes podrán escoger – para profundizar posteriormente – entre casos decididos por
la Corte Penal Internacional, la Corte Europea de Derechos Humanos, la Corte Interamericana de Derechos
Humanos y los Tribunales de Ruanda y Yugoeslavia. Retos para la Paz en la Problemática Contemporánea.

El curso familiariza a los estudiantes con las herramientas prácticas para la investigación, junto con las metodologías para la elaboración de análisis sociales, de derechos humanos y jurídicos. De esta manera el curso no se limita tan solo a las herramientas de negociación, sino que además proveerá a l@s participantes con las técnicas para convertir estas negociaciones en elementos de políticas que pueden ser elaboradas, presentadas y difundidas para su validación. Además, los estudiantes también serán introducidos a las distintas bases de datos disponibles en línea y a los sistemas físicos y la e-biblioteca de la UPAZ; de esta forma podrán desarrollar de forma articulada la propuesta de investigación, para la tesis o para preparar la propuesta de trabajo para la pasantía de grado.

The course aims to develop knowledge of the religious, social, cultural and political roots of terrorism in the Muslim context, providing balanced frameworks that may lead to peaceful transformation.

The course does not start with a simplistic assumption that “religion has been the cause of all conflicts”.  Instead, the course studies critically the role of religion (along with other factors, such as nationalism, ethnicity, race, class, gender, among others) in contributing to conflict causes, influencing its persisting negative and destructive dynamics,  and in peacefully resolving and transforming conflicts.  

The course will be studied from the vantage point of the field of peace and conflict studies, using frameworks and models intended to deeply analyze several case studies from different parts of the world.  The course materials and activities will culminate in an exploration of methods and processes that would advance the positive peaceful role of religion and religious institutions in various types and levels of conflicts, and which are suitable for the realities of the 21st century.

The course will target a wide range of participants, including graduate students of The University for Peace and professionals interested in the topic of religion, conflict and peace.

The course aims at understanding the impact of climate change on the global environment and on human activity.  Climate change increases risks to human livelihoods and as such may endanger the security of individuals and groups. This in turn could increase the propensity for conflict within and between states.
Components of the course will include a critical examination of the drivers of climate change, largely induced by human activity, and a review of international efforts to limit the magnitude of climate changes, including those concluded in Kyoto and Copenhagen. Consequences of climate change for human health, for economic activity, for resource use and resource availability will also be examined, as will be the options for adapting to climate change.
The examination of climate changes will be viewed within the broader context of the current demographic, economic and political global reality.   Introductory comments and discussions led by the instructor will be followed by seminars with broad student input.

The 20th and 21st centuries have been described as the age of globalization, a phenomenon which is increasingly affecting human beings in every aspect of our lives. While globalization has undoubtedly resulted in significant economic and social integration at the global level, it has also brought with it unintended consequences for the respect and promotion of human rights. The principal institutions facilitating this phenomenon, such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank, and the World Trade Organization (WTO), have often been accused of keeping human rights issues out of their respective domains. Corporations also have been accused of undermining human rights, and at times even of being complicit in their violation. An important feature of globalization is its nexus with development policies, including the MDGs/SDGs and development aid, often with regressive effects. The critical challenge facing the present world order, therefore, lies in ensuring that the vehicles of globalization are oriented towards the development and promotion of human rights, through appropriate laws and policies. This course will introduce students to the major themes and debates concerning the linkages between globalization and human rights and explore the new streams of critique that have enabled a confluence as well as a questioning of the globalization-human rights interface.

The geographical integrity of sovereign states is at the core of the contemporary notion of statehood itself. Therefore, when it comes to the specific delimitation of national territories, or the management of specific trans-boundary situations, there are a wealth of large and small maritime and territorial disputes. This course provides a historical overview of how international law has established the boundaries and limits of state jurisdiction, and the ways in which the international community has responded to territorial and maritime disputes around the globe. Close attention shall be given to a key player in this history: the International Court of Justice (ICJ). Additionally, this course will provide an elaborate treatment of the law of the sea and its court, the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea (ITLOS). This part of international law regulates the activities of states and persons at sea as well as maritime boundaries. Its rules are to a large extent laid down in the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. The Convention, which has properly been called the “Constitution for the Oceans,” can be regarded as one of the major accomplishments of the United Nations, in that it deals in a comprehensive manner with all aspects of the uses of the seas, which cover over 70% of the world’s surface.

This course will the complexity of genders, ethnicities races, sexual orientations, religions and their intersectionlity in contemporary peace keeping and peace building work. The course aims to deal with practical and theoretical aspects of identity and its effect on peace building and keeping in the field of conflict transformation and prevention. While notions of Hegemonic masculinies and feminities are questioning what constitute gender vs sex. The course will explore contemporary concepts that attempt to bridge conflicting identities and politicize the process of identity fluidity and development.

This course seeks to clarify the range of purposes that education can and should fulfil before, during and after wars and other emergency situations as part of a humanitarian response and the transformative process of building a culture of peace.

The course focuses on (1) on the different educational challenges in various emergency contexts, (2) on participatory teaching-learning methodologies applicable in such contexts, and (3) on carefully designing education projects in relation to its impact on target groups and society at large.

Central to the course are examples from various conflicts, natural disasters and health crises. The examples show possibilities for formal and non-formal educational strategies and pedagogical methods for helping different kinds of vulnerable groups, the preventive role of education in improving survival and health prospects during or prior to emergencies. The examples are also used to show the conceptual insights, practices and guidelines on which international and local humanitarian agencies and civil society organizations base their work.

The course will be relevant to peace educators and peacebuilders, who want to contribute to educational initiatives and programs designed to meet the needs and enhance the well-being of peoples affected by situations of armed conflicts and other emergencies, whether natural or human–made.

The worlds of ‘working for the betterment of society’ and ‘private enterprise’ are often seen as incompatible. This course will attempt to breakdown that perception in order for participants to see the social sector as a place of opportunity, both to ‘do good’ but also to innovate and build a financially sustainable social enterprise, whether non-profit, for-profit, or some combination of the two. The course suggests that in order to get a socially beneficial idea off the ground, effectively grow it, and make it financially sustainable, social entrepreneurs need to think creatively beyond models of traditional non profits or for-profits. 

This hands-on and dynamic course will expose participants to a number of cases of social entrepreneurs who have converted their desire of building a better world into a reality. The course will include a field-based case where participants will experience first hand a social enterprise in Costa Rica. The course hopes to inspire participants with an entrepreneurial spirit, help gain an understanding of the challenges of the start-up process, and think about the complexities of growing and managing it.

The course will focus on terrorism and related forms of political violence from a comparative and global perspective.  It will look at definitions, the prevalence of terrorism, techniques, the choice of targets, the effects of the media, and sources of support.  The course will also look at different types of terrorist organizations including ones that are primarily seeking to attain ideological objectives, groups with an ethnic or nationalist agenda, organizations with religious motivations, and those groups with a mixture of motives that are difficult to disentangle.  A portion of the course will also look at governmental support of local terrorist groups that target citizens of their own state.  In addition, it will look at counterterrorism and counterinsurgency techniques, including the effects that such activities can have on civil liberties. Finally, the relative success or failure of terrorist groups in achieving their objectives will be evaluated as part of the process of determining what the future is likely to hold.

This course will cover the following topics:

  • In our fast-changing world, what knowledge, values, skills will be critical for the ‘success’ of your learners?
  • How can we help develop innovative mindsets, both for ourselves and our learners, using the breakthrough approaches of design thinking?
  • How can we help contribute to increasing the well-being of our learners in a culture of over-achievement?
  • Given our globalizing world, what does it mean to be a ‘global citizen’ and contribute to building a more sustainable, just, and equitable world?

The Hybrid Diploma in Social Innovation is awarded upon completing 5 of the UPEACE Centre’s courses within a period of 18 months, including one onsite professional development workshop.  You will begin the program in Costa Rica from June 5-7, 2017 for the Positive Leadership seminar. Also required is the online course ‘Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Social Change.’ 

In addition to these courses, you may choose 3 more from the following options:

  • Skills for Effective Negotiations
  • Designing Your Life: Innovating From the Inside Out
  • Educating in Changing Times: Reflect, Rethink, Rebuild
  • Mission Impossible: Measuring Outcomes & Impact
  • Social Media for Social Innovation
  • Regenerative Leadership

These courses are offered several times during the year, so make sure to check our list of courses and their upcoming dates.  In order to enroll in these courses, just send us your choice of courses, so we can reserve your space. 

Please note that travel expenses to and in Costa Rica for the Positive Leadership workshop are not included in the Hybrid Diploma cost of $2,395.

This course will cover the following themes:

  • Integral Leadership
  • Appreciative Inquiry
  • Self-Evaluation and energy audit
  • Conflict Style and Resolution
  • Practicing Innovative Thinking
  • Getting Things Done

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to global politics, focusing in particular on its origins and historical evolution, its key concepts, major theoretical frameworks, main actors and institutions, the global architecture of power, and its dynamic nature in the process of globalization. More specifically, the course introduces concepts of power, statecraft, diplomacy, foreign policy, political economy and international security, and examines the evolution of global politics in the 20th and 21st centuries. The course combines the study of concepts and theories with a range of questions about global politics, such as: Why bother with theory? Why is the world divided in nation-states? How do institutions modify interests and interactions? Is the nation-state in decline? Why do wars occur? What are the causes of terrorism? What are the main global threats of the 21st century? Why war? What is the role of the United Nations in resolving conflict? These and other central questions about the nature of global political relations are examined in this course.

This course introduces participants to the international law dimensions of peace and conflicts. It explores the international legal standards, both in treaty law and in customary international law, that underpin the prevention, management and resolution of inter-state and intra-state conflicts. The course adopts a diverse range of approaches to examine the rules, procedures, successes and failures of key international organizations, including the United Nations, as well as regional organizations, in responding to peace and conflict situations. Several case studies of actual policy responses, or lack thereof, will be explored in the course. Participants will also learn about the limits that international law places on States and non-state actors in peace and conflict situations, before moving into a critical discussion on the debates surrounding lack of enforcement of those standards in international law. Finally, the course will explore how international law intersects with other areas of inquiry related to peace and conflict studies, in order to promote multi-pronged responses to peace and conflict situations.

El Trabajo Final de Graduación - Tesis - se pretende alcanzar con la concentración en el segundo semestre, bajo la supervisión de un asesor ya sea en residencia en la Universidad o según lo determine el Departamento. La Facultad del Departamento coordinará el proceso de tutoría-investigación y escritura de los estudiantes, para ayudar a los estudiantes en la producción de una obra de calidad y perspicacia. Aunque la Facultad estará involucrada en cada etapa de la preparación del documento, se insiste en que los alumnos deben trabajar por su cuenta.

El aprendizaje, por experiencia, ayuda a los estudiantes a desarrollar estrategias creativas para la aplicación y práctica de su educación. Se ofrece a los estudiantes la oportunidad de concentrar la atención y sentido a su experiencia. Las prácticas académicas proporcionan experiencias sin precedentes para que los estudiantes, que toman los conocimientos y habilidades de pensamiento crítico que están aprendiendo en el aula y las aplican en un entorno profesional. Además, proporciona una excelente oportunidad para que el estudiante crea una red social con eventuales colegas en sus respectivas áreas de interés o profesión.

El modelo preferido de la educación experimental se basa en la filosofía de "educación cooperativa", reconociendo el papel respectivo de los estudiantes, universidades y organizaciones de acogida que trabajan juntos para permitir a los estudiantes a explorar sus metas profesionales. En el ámbito del derecho internacional, en particular, una experiencia de primera mano en el trabajo de organización es un complemento perfecto para los cursos académicos durante el programa de maestría.

El periodo de prácticas es una actividad académica y puede ser llevada a cabo por los estudiantes en lugar de una tesis. A la finalización con éxito de las prácticas en términos de los requisitos, con un valor de 8 créditos académicos, contando de esta manera con los requisitos de graduación finales de la misma manera que una tesis.

This course will be addressing the multidisciplinary and holistic concept of Human Security. In this light, it will consider that the new conception of Human Security is people-centred, comprehensive, context-specific and prevention-oriented framework that considers the broad range of conditions that threaten the survival, livelihood and dignity of people, particularly those who are most vulnerable. As such, the Course will be briefly addressing brief overviews on disarmament, the prohibition of weapons of mass destruction (nuclear and chemical weapons), an analysis of arms, control military restraints, reduction of production and trafficking of weapons. Notions on States’ obligations linked to the “responsibility to protect” -- in order to guarantee national and global security-- called Collective Security will be analysed. Similarly, the sessions will look at the seven fears of Humanity and the right to be protected against their complexities intertwined within the social, economic, and political factors going on in our troubled world.

One of the most important tasks of the media is to inform. Objectivity, neutrality and truth are three of the core terms of reference for this task, but in respective to conflicts this is not that easy. How is objectivity possible when it comes to crimes? How can one stay neutral when people suffer?
It is quite easy to state that the media are not neutral enough, and that they take sides and manipulate. Indeed, journalists are not necessarily immune towards propaganda – and yet, it would be short sided to see only this side of war journalism. There is much more to detect than only that. In Peace Journalism reporters are invited to take sides, to write in favour of Human Rights and to look for other perspectives than the usual negative ones. Thus, also Peace Journalism has its clear ethical rules.
During this course we will look at different forms of journalism in conflict situations. Ethical frameworks will give us an idea of the regulations that reporters have to deal with. At the same time this is only one part of the reality. Journalists in war situations and political conflicts are in constant danger. The space for the freedom of expression seems to diminish constantly. How is it possible to work under these circumstances?
Another challenge is the lack of money that the majority of the international media outlets have to deal with, which results in less and less official war correspondents. For journalists this means to work on a freelance basis and be less protected but freer at the same time. What does this mean for the daily work?
This course will give us a glance into a world that is often described in a far too romantic or adventurous way. We will look at examples of text, photography and videos, from mainstream media to bloggers and grassroot journalism, which we will try to analyse from diverse sides, bearing in mind that journalism finally is mostly this: a modern form of storytelling.

This course is offered onsite at the UPEACE campus in Costa Rica.

It will cover the following topics:

  • Educating in a Changing World: Principles, concepts, frameworks and methodologies for educating in a fast-changing world.
  • Pedagogies for the 21st Century: The most suitable teaching and learning strategies in an era where content is freely accessible, information overload is the norm, and ‘making things stick’ is an art.
  • Design Thinking: Applying the principles of design thinking for educators who are ready to implement their ideas and build innovative learning environments.
  • Global Citizenship: Case studies, frameworks, and tools to enable participants to integrate the values of global citizenship, environmental consciousness, and social justice into their future projects.
  • Storytelling and pitching: As ‘edupreneurs’ or innovators in educational change, this course will help you communicate your story to connect with the hearts and minds of your audience. 

Doctor en Ciencias. Mención Ciencias Jurídicas. Mención Honorífica. (2006) Especialista en Derecho Internacional, (1996) Abogado (1992) Facultad de Ciencias Jurídicas y Políticas. Universidad Central de Venezuela. Caracas. Magister Scientiarum en Políticas Públicas. (1998) Certificado en Estudios Diplomáticos (1997) Universidad de Oxford. St. Cross College. Reino Unido. Ex sub director de la Academia Diplomatica de Venezuela (1999-2000), Asesor Legal de la Delegación Regional del Caribe del Comité Internacional de la Cruz Roja (CICR)Coordinador de Investigación. Centro de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad Central de Venezuela. Caracas, 2005 – 2009. Coordinador académico,Facultad de Ciencias Jurídicas y Políticas. Universidad Central de Venezuela. Caracas, 2009 – 2010.  Profesor visitante en la Washington College of Law, Washington DC, Sergio Arboleda y Javeriana en Colombia, Alfonso X El Sabio en Madrid, entre otras. Ha sido consultor para el BID, CAF y gobiernos en América Latina. Autor de 4 libros y más de 40 artículos en revistas y publicaciones académicas.  Actualmente Decano y profesor asociado de la Universidad para la Paz, ONU. San José de Costa Rica.



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FACULTY

Alonso Muñoz is Instructor in the Department of Environment and Development at the University for Peace, where he coordinates the Master of Arts (MA) degree in Responsible Management and Sustainable Economic Development (RMSED). He holds a BSc. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Costa Rica and a Msc. in Business Administration. He has worked in the private sector as a consultant and as an entrepreneur, and has volunteered on various national and international projects regarding peace education, migration, environmental impact of systems and Social Enterprises. He is a novelist, a blogger, a peace advocate, an entrepreneur and passionate about social and environmental development.
Dr. Abdalla is the Senior Advisor on Policy Analysis and Research at the Institute for Peace and Security Studies (IPSS) of Addis Ababa University, and the Senior Advisor on Conflict Resolution at KARAMAH (Muslim Women Lawyers for Human Rights). In 2013-2014, he was Vice President of SALAM Institute for Peace and Justice in Washington, D.C. From 2004-2013 he was Professor, Dean and Vice Rector at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace (UPEACE) in Costa Rica. Prior to that, he was a Senior Fellow with the Peace Operations Policy Program, School of Public Policy, at George Mason University, Virginia. He was also a Professor of Conflict Analysis and Resolution at the Graduate School of Islamic and Social Sciences in Leesburg, Virginia. He practiced law as a prosecuting attorney from 1978 to 1987 in Egypt. He then emigrated to the U.S. where he obtained a Master's degree in Sociology and a Ph.D. in Conflict Analysis and Resolution from George Mason University. He has been teaching graduate classes in conflict analysis and resolution, and has conducted training, research and evaluation of conflict resolution and peacebuilding programs in several countries in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. He teaches regularly (face-to-face and online) at American University in Washington, D.C., University for Peace, University of Addis Ababa, and Open University of Catalonia. Dr. Abdalla pioneered the development of the first conflict resolution training manual for the Muslim communities in the United States titled (“…Say Peace”). He also founded Project LIGHT (Learning Islamic Guidance for Human Tolerance), a community peer-based anti-discrimination project funded by the National Conference for Community and Justice (NCCJ). In 2011, he established with Egyptian UPEACE graduates a program for community prevention of sectarian violence in Egypt (Ahl el Hetta).
Arlinda Rrustemi born in Pristina, Kosovo. She is a researcher and lecturer at Leiden University and she also assists in the Global Affairs minor. She was a research assistant to Prof. Jaap de Hoop Scheffer. She was involved in courses taught at the Advanced LL.M. programme in Public International Law and at Leiden University College. She holds a B.A. (cum laude) from the Roosevelt Academy and an LL.M. degree in Public International Law from Utrecht University. Arlinda is pursuing a doctoral degree in the interdisciplinary research of law and politics called "State-Building through Life Stories: Incorporating Local Perspectives”, supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). She has previously worked as a project intern at the Youth Initiative for Human Rights (YIHR) in Kosovo, as a legal intern at the International Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), as an external relations intern at the International Criminal Court (ICC) and as intern at various Ministries in the Republic of Kosovo. Her research interests are in post-conflict reconstruction, state, nation and peace building, the accountability of international organizations, international relations and diplomacy. Her research interests are in post-conflict reconstruction, state, nation and peace building, storytelling, humanitarian intervention and the accountability of international organizations.
Daniela Ingruber is an Austrian war researcher, journalist and editor, also working as a consultant for film productions and film festivals. Since 2008 she has been a core faculty member of the UNESCO Chair for Peace at the University of Innsbruck/Austria. From March 2017 on she will be Program Coordinator of the respective Peace Studies Master Program. Besides she lectures at the UN-mandated University for Peace (Upeace) in Costa Rica, in Thailand and at different Universities in Austria. Her main fields of research are conflict transformation through art, ethical journalism, war photography, storytelling as well as social hubs and their role in peaceful resistance. It is important for her to combine theory with practical work, thus she tries to combine academic research with experiences in art as well as in field work of conflict regions. Currently Daniela Ingruber is preparing 3 publications as a co-editor, one on transrational resonances of the many peaces (USA), one on art & politics (Austria) as well as one on endings (Singapore). www.nomadin.at nomadin@nomadin.at

Juan Carlos Sainz-Borgo is the Dean for Academic Affairs and Associate Professor at UPEACE. He is also Associate Professor of International Law at the Universidad Central de Venezuela in Caracas since 1998. Professor of Humanitarian International Law at the Universidad Sergio Arboleda in Bogota since 2009; he was Fulbright Visiting Professor at the Washington College of Law at the American University in 2008-2009. He served as Jurist to the Regional Delegation of Venezuela and the Caribbean of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). Juan Carlos Sainz-Borgo has a Law Degree, Master in International Law and Doctorate (Cum Laude) from the Universidad Central de Venezuela in Caracas and a Master Degree from Oxford University, UK. He has published four books on international law and international relations and a numerous articles in different publications in the field.

Kees Wiebering has been a professional practitioner in peacebuilding projects since the mid-1990s. Over the years, he designed, implemented, monitored and evaluated peacebuilding projects, as well as taught and facilitated many workshops on cross cutting peace building related issues. He works as independent consultant, mediator, trainer and coach for professionals in peacebuilding. His work focuses on dialogue, conflict sensitivity, peace and conflict impact assessment, intercultural communication, project development and peace education.

He holds a Master of Science in Philosophy and Physics and holds degrees in organisation development and mediation. He was member of the core-trainer team for a 4-month course for peacebuilders at the Academy for Conflict Transformation in Cologne, Germany. He is an independent lecturer at the Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main. His research interests are the role of dialogue in peace processes, civil society development and NGO cooperation.

Head, Dept. of Peace and Conflict Studies, Resident Professor and Academic Coordinator of International Peace Studies Programme and International Peace Studies with specialization in Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Programme
Dr. Manish Thapa is Head of the Department of Peace and Conflict Studies and Resident Professor of International Peace Studies Master Programme at the University for Peace. He is one of the founding members of Department of Conflict, Peace & Development Studies at Tribhuvan University Nepal (2007-2015). He is also currently Visiting Professor at the Institute of International Relations, University of Warsaw, Poland and Senior Research Fellow at Center for Europe – University of Warsaw- Poland. He received his Post Doctorate in International Relations from the University of Warsaw. He has served as Research Fellow in several universities and institutes in Europe and North America such as the University of Warsaw; Department of Peace & Conflict Research, Uppsala University; Brown University; McGill-Echenberg Human Rights Fellow & Jeanne Sauvé Scholar, McGill University; Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame. His publications include 6 books and numerous journal articles and book chapters including "Foreign Policy in the Global South: Anti-Westernism, Rhetoric and Identity" (Co-editor), London: Routledge 2017 (Forthcoming - In Press); "From Bullet to Ballot – Peacemaking and Peacebuilding in Nepal: Lessons Learned and Unlearned" (Editor), London: Routledge 2017 (Proposal accepted); “Internal Conflicts & Peacebuilding Challenges" (Editor), New Delhi: K W Publishers 2016 and "India in the Contemporary World: Polity, Economy and International Relations" (Co-editor), London: Routledge 2014.

Dr. Mihir Kanade (India) is the Academic Coordinator of UPEACE, the Head of its Department of International Law, and the Director of the UPEACE Human Rights Centre. He holds an LL.B. from Nagpur University (India) and a Master degree and Doctorate from UPEACE. He is also an adjunct faculty at Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio (Spain), Cheikh Anta Diop University (Senegal), and Long Island University (United States). His principal area of academic research and study is International Law, Human Rights and Globalization, covering several themes within that interface including trade and investment, sustainable development, forced migration, indigenous peoples’ rights, public health, amongst others. He has extensive experience in training staff of inter-governmental, governmental and non-governmental organizations, as well as professionals, in the field of human rights. He acts as an advisor to several human rights organizations and corporations on issues related to international law and human rights. He serves on the International Advisory Board of the International Bar Association on the topic of Business and Human Rights. He also leads a project of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on promoting the Right to Development. Prior to his pursuit in academia, Mihir practiced for several years as a lawyer at the Bombay High Court and at the Supreme Court of India.
Dr. Miriam Estrada-Castillo (Ecuador) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of International Law. Prior to joining UPEACE, Dr. Estrada-Castillo worked as the Senior legal and political officer in the United Nations Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED). Prior to that position, she has worked with the UN system in various capacities, including as the International Prosecutor General, UN Peacekeeping Mission for East-Timor (DPKO), Expert and Vice-Chairperson of the Monitoring Committee of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), Chief of Field of the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, and the Latin America Regional Adviser on Gender, Human Rights and Culture of Peace for UNESCO. She has also worked as the President of the Ecuadorian Supreme Court of Juvenile Justice and as the Minister of Social Affairs in Ecuador. In her academic life, she worked recently as the Director of Master Degree Courses on Gender and the Law and Children in Armed Conflict, Lund University, Sweden. She is a Visiting Professor of the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law (RWI) and has also taught courses as a Visiting Professor at the Australian National University. She is the author of the Ecuadorian Law on Violence against Women and of the first Legislation for Minors and Family in the country.

Director of the UPEACE Centre for Executive and Professional Education and a faculty member at UPEACE. Prior to this position, he served as Education Programme Manager of the Earth Charter Initiative, an international nonprofit organization. Before his 4-years in the non-profit sector, he worked both in the private sector and also as a high school teacher in Ecuador. He has a Bachelor's degree from Stanford University and his Master's from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

An ethnobiologist who researches food harvesting in Costa Rica. For the past decade her research program has focused on access to food in Costa Rican national parks. Specifically her emphasis has been on Indigenous rights to access and harvest cultural food. Olivia is a member of the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the International Society of Ethnobiology, the Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage Project, and the POLIS Project on Ecological Governance. Being active within these networks allows her to work at the interface of policy and practice regarding food harvesting and access.

Instructor, Liason, Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Specialization and Editor, Peace and Conflict Monitor and Peace and Conflict Review Ross Ryan holds degrees in political science and literature from McMaster University, Canada and the M.A. degree in environmental security from the University for Peace, Costa Rica. He is chief editor of the Peace and Conflict Monitor and managing editor of the Peace and Conflict Review, as well as instructor in the department of peace studies and liaison officer of the media, peace and conflict studies specialization. He is currently working on a research project entitled “Information Technology, Civic Engagement, and the Cyber-Ethnography of Peace Movements”.

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