Academic Course Calendar - Environment, Development and Peace - 2017 - 2018

Courses and Teachers
2017 - 2018 - Environment, Development and Peace
Course listings are continously updated with new information
Courses Teacher Credits # Weeks Dates
UPEACE Foundation Course
Mandatory
Alonso Muñoz
(Costa Rica)
Heather Kertyzia
(Canada)
Jan Breitling
(Germany)
Manish Thapa
(Nepal)
Mayumi Yamada
(Japan)
Mihir Kanade
(India)
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
21 Aug-08 Sep 2017
8:45am - 11:45am At Council Room
Environment, Conflicts, and Sustainability
Mandatory
Jan Breitling
(Germany)
3 credits
3 weeks
18 Sep-06 Oct 2017
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Council Room
The United Nations System and UPMUNC (Part I)
Mandatory
José Riera-Cézanne
(United States)
Mihir Kanade
(India)
2 credits
2 weeks
11-25 Oct 2017
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Water, Security and Peace
Recommended
Julie Ann Elkins Watson
(USA)
3 credits
3 weeks
30 Oct-17 Nov 2017
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #1
Sustainable Agriculture
Recommended
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
30 Oct-17 Nov 2017
1:15 AM - 4:15 AM At Classroom #4
Management of Coastal Resources
Recommended
Marco Quesada
(Costa Rica)
3 credits
3 weeks
20 Nov-05 Dec 2017
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #1
Forests, Forestry and Poverty
Recommended
Jan Breitling
(Germany)
3 credits
3 weeks
27 Nov-13 Dec 2017
1:15 PM - 4:15 PM At Classroom #2
Research Methods
Mandatory
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
15 Jan-02 Feb 2018
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Council Room
The Kurds between Past and Present Genocides in Iraq: Fresh Hopes or New Tragedies?
Optional
Mohammed Ihsan

2 credits
2 weeks
15-26 Jan 2018
At Classroom #3
Rethinking of Peace in the Anthropocene
Mandatory
Hans Günter Brauch
(German)
1 credits
1 weeks
5-9 Feb 2018
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Other
Natural Resource Management Field Course
Mandatory
Jan Breitling
(Germany)
3 credits
3 weeks
12-27 Feb 2018
1:15 PM - 4:15 PM At Council Room
Food Security
Recommended
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
5-23 Mar 2018
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #5
Climate Change Governance
Recommended
Narinder Kakar
(India)
2 credits
2 weeks
2-13 Apr 2018
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #5
Introduction to Responsible Management
Recommended
Andre Nijhof
(Netherlands)
2 credits
2 weeks
2-13 Apr 2018
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #4
Climate Change Governance II
Recommended
TBA .

1 credits
1 weeks
16-20 Apr 2018
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #5
Project Management
Recommended
Alonso Muñoz
(Costa Rica)
1 credits
1 weeks
16-20 Apr 2018
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #4
Climate Adaptation and Climate Justice
Recommended
Olivia Sylvester
(Canada)
3 credits
3 weeks
2-22 May 2018
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #5
The United Nations System and UPMUNC (Part II)
Mandatory
Ross Ryan
(Canada)
1 credits
1 weeks
28-30 May 2018
8:45 a.m. - 4:15 p.m. At Council Room
Leading in Times of Change: Innovating from the inside out
Mandatory
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
3 credits
3 weeks
4-22 Jun 2018
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Council Room



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COURSE DESCRIPTION

The UPEACE Foundation Course provides a critical and concise introduction to the broad field of “Peace Studies” for students in ALL UPEACE programs. It initially addresses key conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of the origins and development of peace studies as an interdisciplinary area within the fields of international relations and political economy. Based on a critical analysis of policies, strategies, institutions, organizations and movements, the course then examines a range of core issues, dimensions, perspectives and paradigms for understanding the root causes of conflicts and violence and constructive strategies to address them and build peace in contemporary global, international, regional, national and local contexts. The core concepts include militarization, disarmament and arms control; human rights violations and promotion; gender inequalities, gender-based violence and gender mainstreaming; structural violence, human security, development and globalization; environmental sustainability; corporate social responsibility; international law in conflict and peacebuilding; cultural and religious identities; media’s role in conflict and peacebuilding; strategies of nonviolence; and peace education. This Foundations course will be essential in catalyzing the awareness, understanding and motivation of UPEACE students in diverse academic programs to relate, ground and intersect their specific areas of academic and practitioner interest with core theoretical, conceptual and analytical ideas in peace studies.

This course will take a close look at the linkages between the environment and peace and conflict. First we will introduce the theme of global environmental change and its impacts on human security, development and life in general. We will discuss the different root causes of these environmental and social or development crises as they come forward in the literature, focusing on overpopulation, industrial development, and free market capitalism and globalization. Part of this discussion will be an analysis of the responses to this crisis and what can, should and is being done to stop it.

A second theme we will discuss is the way sustainability is defined and measured, analyzing different aspects of the political characteristics of measuring, and of the complexities around coming up and using indicators to measure something as complex as sustainability. We will analyze the often proposed focus based on the faith on technological efficiency, and demonstrate that technology by itself won’t solve the sustainability problem with regards to the environmental and social dimensions.

A third main theme of this course is to look at the different linkages between environment and violent conflicts. We will discuss the literature on environmental security, going from older frameworks of scarcity induced conflicts to more complex notions of natural resource abundance, globalization, and historical, political, ecological and economic issues that influence peace and conflicts. The topic of environmental peacebuilding will be presented and critically analyzed. We will make use of specific case studies that give insights into the often contradictory roles of the environment and natural resources when analyzing peace and conflicts.

The pursuit of an elusive peace for humanity has been one of the major driving forces for the establishment of international organisations throughout History. The struggled for maintenance of peace and peaceful settlement of disputes have been the most important aim of most Humanity. Two world wars have been needed, however, to institute finally an international organisation committed itself essentially “to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights, in the dignity and worth of the human person, in the equal rights of men and women and of nations large and small, to establish conditions under which justice and respect for the obligations arising from treaties and other sources of international law can be maintained, and to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom”  The United Nations emerged in 1945 as a stronger and wiser international organisation resolved to avoid the circumstances that led to the failure of its predecessor, the League of Nations.

After 70 years of its foundation, the historical, socio-political and economic development circumstances of the world have changed and with them, the UN has evolved towards a contemporary new architecture reflected in the adoption of an organisational philosophy able to respond to the current necessities of the world particularly on the subjects related to pacific settlement, collective security and development. One of the most important changes relates to the new criteria about Peace. In the world of former UN Secretary General Ban Ki Mon “Building peace is about much more than ending war. It is about putting in place the institutions and trust that will carry people forward into a peaceful future. We often have a limited window of opportunity in which to do this.”

This course explores conflict, insecurity and collaboration in relation to scarcity, poor quality, and variability of freshwater resources. Students will examine disputes and conflict over access to fresh water resources and rivers, including dam construction.  

A special focus will be on how conflict over transboundary freshwater resources has fostered peace building through cooperative co-management. Throughout the course, mechanisms and instruments will be introduced to assist the resolution and prevention of water-related conflict and insecurity including: international law; institutional arrangements; governance and policy reform; and involvement of civil society organizations.

In this course we will become familiar with contemporary issues in sustainable agriculture and critically analyze key debates in the field. To provide context to our discussions, we will situate the emergence of sustainable agricultural practices within their historic contexts. To identify contemporary issues in sustainable agriculture and key debates, we will be guided by the United Nations post-2015 development agenda. Throughout our course students will examine contemporary issues through a critical review of the published literature and through hands-on experience at the UPEACE farm, as well as with farmers and representatives of small-scale agribusinesses.

This course will provide a brief introduction to the particularities of coastal and oceanic resources and ecologies. Second, we will investigate the unique attributes of the human economic, social, and cultural systems (i.e. fishing, fisherman and fishing cultures) that are most directly dependent upon them. Among the many topics within this section, the course will specifically focus on understanding artisanal fisheries, large-scale/industrial fishing, and aquaculture, as well as the differences and conflicts that exist between these methods of resource extraction. Third, a broad overview of the development of the current resource crises and conflicts will be presented and examined via case studies from throughout the globe. Fourth, the evolution of and trends in coastal and marine management over the last century will also be a central aspect of this course.  

Thus, we will explore the evolution from traditional top-down models to the implementation of stakeholder inclusion participation, and comanagment. We will also thoroughly review the role of marine parks, protected areas, and no-take reserves in the management and conservation of coastal resources. Finally, through practical exercises, guest lectures, and field visits, students will be able to explore the complex nexus of relations between humans and coastal/marine resources as it applies to Latin America and the case of Costa Rica.  

In sum, students in this course will gain insight into and knowledge of how we have moved from the naïve perspectives of Mare Liberum and the inexhaustibility of oceanic resources, which were predominant in the 19th century, to the increasingly complex layers of marine tenure systems, marine protected areas, and precautionary approaches that characterize contemporary 21st century marine and coastal resource

Deforestation is seen by many as one of the main global environmental challenges of our times, because of its significant impact on biodiversity and its important contribution to Global Warming. This course analyzes the way deforestation has been and is being explained by both mainstream and alternative narratives, critically engages with the way it is defined and measured, and discusses the various attempts in stopping or reducing it. Additionally, this course takes a look at the links between poverty and deforestation, some of the possible strategies to reduce poverty through forest-based activities, and analyzes and discusses the importance of forests for humans and the challenges faced by those who try to manage them sustainably.

The central goal of this course is to provide the students with a basic variety of research tools, methods and approaches used in the social sciences.  The final goal of this course is to enable them to formulate research problems, select a research approach, develop and implement a research design, and review and criticize investigations executed by peers and colleagues in the wider research community.
This course offers students with foundational knowledge of qualitative and quantitative methods, elements to discern how and when they should be used, and the benefits and drawbacks of each specific method. It will develop students’ theoretical knowledge and applied skills in conducting qualitative and participatory research with ample field examples from the social and natural sciences, addressing issues, challenges and emerging trends in a globalized world.

This course introduces students to the struggles of Kurds in the context of genocides committed against
them in the past as well as in the current ongoing conflict against ISIS. It explores the Kurdish national
movement  and  its  prospects  and  challenges.  At  the  end  of  the  course,  the  students  will  have  an understanding of the history of the Kurds in the Middle East with specific emphasis on the Kurds of Iraq from the birth of Kurdish nationalism to the present day. The first session will offer an overview of the history of the Kurds and their relation with the succeeding Iraqi governments. The second session will cover the history of genocides in Iraq against the Kurds and other minorities exploring the causes and the consequences for the political and social stability of the area. The third session will focus on the heritage that this culture of violence has created in the area and the genocides committed by ISIS. The fourth session will discuss the future of Iraq and the Kurds in the context of the Middle East. The last session will explore which is the future of Iraq as a country after the liberation of Mosul and the new balance of power born from the end of the war with ISIS and the definitive collapse of the order established in 1916 with the Sykes-Picot Agreement.

This class is an opportunity to explore in-depth how different land-uses and conservation approaches intermingle in one particular region: the South of Costa Rica.  The purpose of the field trip is to obtain critical direct experience and knowledge of important natural resources management issues in a developing country, given the real political, economic and ecological context of the same. This course enables students to assess the contextual factors that affect natural resource management. Over the course of the trip, we will visit and be exposed to projects and issues with various resources, different actors involved in the management and different institutional settings.

The objective of this course is to first explore the nature of our food systems and the paradox of why, despite the apparent scientific and technological developments in agriculture enabling production of a worldwide food surplus, food insecurity is increasing globally. Secondly, students will explore what needs to change in our food systems in order to reach a goal of sustainable food security.

To achieve these two objectives, students will be encouraged to explore food security from a household and community perspective in order to understand the environmental factors that contribute to food insecurity. This knowledge-building process will be done through group tasks in the classroom and in the field. Students will be expected to undertake practical work to assess the situation of households vulnerable to food insecurity, hopefully in two locations, one urban and one rural. The course emphasizes “learning by doing” and so there will be field trips to two locations to meet vulnerable households and to assess successful local research initiatives which are increasing household and community food security.

Group work in the class will address defining food security and what constitutes a healthy sustainable food system. In addition, there will be group work, for example, in exploring the causes of famines, the issue of food justice and a right to food, the problems of food aid, and the implications of commoditization of our food systems. To bring out opposing viewpoints on food issues, part of the group work will be organized as debates. The intention of the course is to emphasise experiential learning rather than focus on formal lectures although there will be an initial presentation by the instructor on a food security topic prior to each workshop session. Hopefully, students will have gained both practical skills and theoretical knowledge about hunger, famine and food security and will feel confident and empowered to address these issues directly or indirectly in their future work.

This course analyzes the nature and evolution of systems of governance to address climate change at the international, national, and local levels, charting the changing history of climate policy from the issue's initial introduction into political discussion to its recent ascension to become the new "master concept" of environmental governance generally.  The roles of various stakeholders in the negotiation, including transnational institutions, nation states, nongovernmental organizations, private businesses, and municipal governments, will be examined, as will the efficacy of different mechanisms (state-led, market-based, hybrid, etc.) for enacting climate policy.  The potential impact of climate policy on particular environmental issues (e.g., hydroelectric and nuclear power) and social groups (e.g., women, minorities, indigenous peoples) will be discussed as well.  Case studies will examine specific instances of climate policy and negotiation, including recent UNFCCC conferences, Costa Rica's own payment for environmental services (PES) and "Peace with Nature" climate neutrality initiative, and the emerging debate over proposed REDD (Reduced Emissions through Deforestation and Degradation) mechanisms.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a toolkit to support responsible management and decision-making in private, public, and third sector organisations of different sizes. The course offers an understanding of how different strategic and operational decisions in organisations influence the actors, practices, and structures in the spheres of business, society, and the natural environment. Lectures will focus on studying and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of the contemporary management literature, including the shareholder primacy model, enlightened self-interest, institutional theory, stakeholder approach, corporate social responsibility, environmental management, corporate citizenship, public-private partnership, sustainable supply chain management, humanitarian logistics, sustainable organisation, and ecocentric organisation theory. In the course students will be working with several case studies and describing the current state of the managerial praxis, as well as evaluating the suggested implications to develop the organisational practices for sustainable development. As the main benefits, students will attain skills and knowledge that enables them to make their own judgements of what responsible management is, and what is not, in varying kinds of organisational settings.

We undertake dozens of projects every day, most of them excessively small to even think about them as projects. Others, sometimes way to big and complex to deal with without the proper planning. A project could be as simple as organizing a dinner party with a small group of friends, and as complex as relocating a whole factory to a different continent without stopping production, and everything in between. A project is considered to be a success if it achieves the objectives according to the acceptance criteria, within an agreed timescale and budget. Project management, therefore, is the application of processes, methods, knowledge, skills and experience to achieve those project objectives. This short self-guided online course is meant to provide the key concepts, standard terminology and guidelines of managing a project.

The UPEACE Model United Nations Conference (UPMUNC) is a graduate-level simulation of the real United Nations Organization, its most important specialized agencies, and other associated organizations. UPMUNC provides a common platform for UPEACE students and participants from several other universities to discuss international affairs and to gain a greater understanding of the procedures of the United Nations. Participants become familiar with key global issues by becoming part of the international decision making process to resolve them, and in so doing, are given an opportunity to apply their skills in negotiations, public speaking, and diplomacy.

This course, which is the concluding one in the Masters program, aims to help participants take the next step in their personal and professional journey. It focuses on a human paradigm of leadership – the ability to reflect on self, think about people you collaborate with, and reflect on frameworks for engaging people around a common goal. Using cutting-edge concepts in positive psychology, human centered design, and appreciative inquiry, the course will give participants the space, structure, support and motivation to answer some fundamental questions regarding strengths, limiting beliefs, and key priorities. The course is structured to be leaner-centered, and will involve a variety of teaching approaches, including brief presentations, case studies, guest speakers, a variety of group exercises, TED-style videos and simulations. Overall, the overarching objective of the course is to provide an opportunity for participants to step back from the day-to-day and reflect upon important questions about life goals and how to take action on them. 



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FACULTY

Alonso Muñoz is Instructor in the Department of Environment and Development at the University for Peace, where he coordinates the Master of Arts (MA) degree in Responsible Management and Sustainable Economic Development (RMSED). He holds a BSc. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Costa Rica and a Msc. in Business Administration. He has worked in the private sector as a consultant and as an entrepreneur, and has volunteered on various national and international projects regarding peace education, migration, environmental impact of systems and Social Enterprises. He is a novelist, a blogger, a peace advocate, an entrepreneur and passionate about social and environmental development.

André Nijhof (1969) has a masters degree in Business Administration from the University of Twente. He started his working life as a researcher of organisational change in multinational companies like Akzo Nobel, Asito, Shell Pernis, Stegeman Sara Lee and Vredestein. Based on his research he finished his PhD at the University of Twente just before the turn of the century (1999). Next he became a senior consultant at Q-Consult, where he specialized in corporate social responsibility and the implementation of management systems. Andre is former chairman of the Dutch Network on Business Ethics. Since 2007 he has been associate professor at the European Institute for Business Ethics, part of Nyenrode Business Universiteit.

He is editor of the Hexagon Book Series on Human and Environmental Security and Peace (HESP), of the Springer Briefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace (ESDP), of the SpringerBriefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice (PSP); of Pioneers in Arts, Humanities, Science, Engineering, Practice (PAH-SEH) and of The Anthropocene: Politik—Economics—Society—Science (APESS) with Springer International Publishing (Cham – Heidelberg). He has been visiting professor of international relations at the universities of Frankfurt am Main, Leipzig, Greifswald, and Erfurt; re-search associate at Heidelberg and Stuttgart universities, and research fellow at Har¬vard and Stanford Universities

Resident Professor and Academic Coordinator of Peace Education Programme
Heather Kertyzia is currently Resident Professor and Academic Coordinator of Peace Education Master Programme at the University for Peace. She is also an assistant professor of Negotiation, Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding at California State University Dominguez Hills. She focuses on peace education, working with teachers in participatory action research to create more peaceful secondary schools. As a former secondary school teacher, Heather understands the importance of the local community in building more socially, economically and environmentally just educational spaces. As an interdisciplinary student and scholar, she has worked with communities throughout the Americas, with a recent focus on partnering with local grassroots organizations in Nicaragua.

Jan Breitling is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environment and Development at University for Peace. He holds a BSc. in Tropical Forestry, from the Technological Institute of Costa Rica, and a MSc. in Environmental Sciences from WUR Wageningen University and Research Center, The Netherlands. His research interests include root causes of deforestation and Global Environmental Change, and Environmental Governance, specifically market based approaches addressing biodiversity conservation and Climate Change.
Professor José Riera-Cézanne is Adjunct Professor in the Department of International Law at UPEACE as well as an international consultant (United Nations and non-governmental organizations). He joined UPEACE in 2017 following 32 years of distinguished service with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), most recently as Special Adviser to the Assistant UN High Commissioner for Refugees (Protection), Mr. Volker Türk. Professor Riera-Cézanne is a seasoned expert in multilateral consultations and negotiations relating to refugees and other populations who are of concern to UNHCR and to the United Nations, as well humanitarian issues more broadly. He brings to UPAZ his in-depth knowledge of international refugee law and protection issues; international humanitarian law and norms relating to the protection of the world’s growing number of internally displaced persons; international law relating to statelessness and nationality; human rights law; international migration and efforts to improve global governance of international migration and refugee flows; international migration and human rights; comprehensive refugee response frameworks as called for in the United Nations General Assembly’s New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants of 2016; climate change and its ramifications for migration, displacement and planned relocation of affected populations; humanitarian accountability; evaluations of humanitarian assistance; fund raising from Governments, Foundations and others; and the UN’s cooperation with faith-based actors in development and humanitarian interventions. Professor Riera-Cézanne holds degrees from Yale College (BA cum laude, SY ’77), Columbia Law School (JD ’81), the Parker School of Foreign and International Law (Certificate in Foreign and International Law ‘81). He has also worked towards a doctorate from the Graduate Institute in Geneva, Switzerland, and studied at The Hague Academy of International Law (Private international law and Public international law). His principal area of academic research is documenting the impacts of climate change on human mobility and identifying effective adaptation strategies and State policies to promote them. He has lectured in a number of universities over the years, including the NATO School, (Germany) the University of Washington (USA) and the University of Groningen (Neth.). Lectures and presentations Contribution to the United Nations Global Compact on Refugees: Lessons from the 1989 International Conference on Refugees in Central America (CIREFCA), UNHCR-organized meeting on “Towards a global compact on refugees”, Thematic discussion 1 on Past and current burden- and responsibility-sharing arrangements, Palais des Nations, Geneva, 10 July 2017 Recent Developments in International Governance of International Migration and Refugee Flows: The New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants, Lecture at the University of Washington, Faculty of Geography and Migration, 27 February 2017 (Unpublished – available upon request) The UN’s Cooperation with Faith-based Actors: Recent Developments, Lecture at the University of Washington, Faculty of Geography and Migration, 27 February 2017 (Unpublished – available upon request)

Dr. Julie Watson is a PhD in geography with expertise in transboundary water conflict and cooperation.
Julie's goal is to figure out ways we can collaborate more effectively over shared water resources while addressing inequities in access to water for all its uses. She's especially interested in environmental justice, participatory processes, and the integration of qualitative, hard-to-measure values alongside the quantifiable in more holistic decision-making frameworks.
Julie is certified in mediation and transboundary water conflict transformation. She has produced a documentary film and measured its value as a facilitation tool, and she has created training modules and conducted workshops to build practitioner capacity for conflict management. Julie's passion is creating a resilient process and facilitating stronger partnerships to catalyze creative, strategic, and resilient water governance solutions for more peaceful, just water management.

 

Head, Dept. of Peace and Conflict Studies, Resident Professor and Academic Coordinator of International Peace Studies Programme and International Peace Studies with specialization in Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Programme
Dr. Manish Thapa is Head of the Department of Peace and Conflict Studies and Resident Professor of International Peace Studies Master Programme at the University for Peace. He is one of the founding members of Department of Conflict, Peace & Development Studies at Tribhuvan University Nepal (2007-2015). He is also currently Visiting Professor at the Institute of International Relations, University of Warsaw, Poland and Senior Research Fellow at Center for Europe – University of Warsaw- Poland. He received his Post Doctorate in International Relations from the University of Warsaw. He has served as Research Fellow in several universities and institutes in Europe and North America such as the University of Warsaw; Department of Peace & Conflict Research, Uppsala University; Brown University; McGill-Echenberg Human Rights Fellow & Jeanne Sauvé Scholar, McGill University; Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, University of Notre Dame. His publications include 6 books and numerous journal articles and book chapters including "Foreign Policy in the Global South: Anti-Westernism, Rhetoric and Identity" (Co-editor), London: Routledge 2017 (Forthcoming - In Press); "From Bullet to Ballot – Peacemaking and Peacebuilding in Nepal: Lessons Learned and Unlearned" (Editor), London: Routledge 2017 (Proposal accepted); “Internal Conflicts & Peacebuilding Challenges" (Editor), New Delhi: K W Publishers 2016 and "India in the Contemporary World: Polity, Economy and International Relations" (Co-editor), London: Routledge 2014.

M.Sc. in Marine Biology, Universidad de Costa Rica.  Ph.D. candidate, Marine Affairs Department, University of Rhode Island. Coordinator, Southern Central America Marine Program, Conservation International. Member of the Costa Rican Ocean Commission, in representation of Conservation International and of the Costa Rican Marine resources sub-commission, within the Presidential “Peace with Nature” Initiative. Appointed to Costa Rica’s technical working group for the South Pacific, for the assessment of the viability of establishing a new marine protected area in Costa Rica’s south Pacific. As a member of Costa Rica’s EEZ Commission, active participation in the elaboration of Costa Rica’s National Marine Strategy. Professor, Introduction to Fisheries Management (B-0681), School of Biology, University of Costa Rica.

Mayumi Yamada (Ph.D.).
Resident Professor and Head of Doctoral Programme

Dr. Mayumi Yamada is Resident Professor and Head of the Doctoral Programme of the UN Mandated University for Peace (UPEACE) in Costa Rica. Prior to joining UPEACE, she worked as the Recovery, Reintegration & Peace Building Officer of United Nations Mission in South Sudan. During the December Crisis 2013 in South Sudan, she remained as a life-saving staff, directly managing one of the biggest Protection of Civilians sites by supporting humanitarian assistance. Before joining UNMISS, she worked with UNDP Offices in Kazakhstan (Semipalatinsk: ex-nuclear testing sites), Maldives, Lao PDR and Solomon Islands, and the UN Centre for Regional Development (Disaster Management Planning Unit). She holds a Ph.D. Degree in Sustainable Development from Imperial College London, UK. She is originally from Kobe (Japan), who survived from the Great Hanshin- Awaji Earthquake in 1995.

Dr. Mihir Kanade (India) is the Academic Coordinator of UPEACE, the Head of its Department of International Law, and the Director of the UPEACE Human Rights Centre. He holds an LL.B. from Nagpur University (India) and a Master degree and Doctorate from UPEACE. He is also an adjunct faculty at Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio (Spain), Cheikh Anta Diop University (Senegal), and Long Island University (United States). His principal area of academic research and study is International Law, Human Rights and Globalization, covering several themes within that interface including trade and investment, sustainable development, forced migration, indigenous peoples’ rights, public health, amongst others. He has extensive experience in training staff of inter-governmental, governmental and non-governmental organizations, as well as professionals, in the field of human rights. He acts as an advisor to several human rights organizations and corporations on issues related to international law and human rights. He serves on the International Advisory Board of the International Bar Association on the topic of Business and Human Rights. He also leads a project of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on promoting the Right to Development. Prior to his pursuit in academia, Mihir practiced for several years as a lawyer at the Bombay High Court and at the Supreme Court of India.
Dr. Miriam Estrada-Castillo (Ecuador) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of International Law. Prior to joining UPEACE, Dr. Estrada-Castillo worked as the Senior legal and political officer in the United Nations Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED). Prior to that position, she has worked with the UN system in various capacities, including as the International Prosecutor General, UN Peacekeeping Mission for East-Timor (DPKO), Expert and Vice-Chairperson of the Monitoring Committee of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), Chief of Field of the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, and the Latin America Regional Adviser on Gender, Human Rights and Culture of Peace for UNESCO. She has also worked as the President of the Ecuadorian Supreme Court of Juvenile Justice and as the Minister of Social Affairs in Ecuador. In her academic life, she worked recently as the Director of Master Degree Courses on Gender and the Law and Children in Armed Conflict, Lund University, Sweden. She is a Visiting Professor of the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law (RWI) and has also taught courses as a Visiting Professor at the Australian National University. She is the author of the Ecuadorian Law on Violence against Women and of the first Legislation for Minors and Family in the country.

Director of the UPEACE Centre for Executive and Professional Education and a faculty member at UPEACE. Prior to this position, he served as Education Programme Manager of the Earth Charter Initiative, an international nonprofit organization. Before his 4-years in the non-profit sector, he worked both in the private sector and also as a high school teacher in Ecuador. He has a Bachelor's degree from Stanford University and his Master's from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mr. Kakar was most recently the Director of the University’s United Nations Liaison Office in New York, where he served concurrently as the Permanent Observer of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN). Prior to joining UPEACE, Mr. Kakar spent 30 years with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), holding diverse posts with progressively increasing responsibility in Yemen, Guyana, Turkey and China. He most recently served as the Country Coordinator in the Maldives. Among his other UNDP posts, he was Deputy Director and subsequently Director of the Division for Resource Mobilization in New York. During his long career with the United Nations, Mr. Kakar served on a number of bodies, including the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund from 1989 to 1995. He also chaired the Joint Appeals Board during the 1990s and was the first member of the United Nations Federal Credit Union Board of Directors, chairing it from 1991 to 1995. A citizen of India, Mr. Kakar received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Delhi Polytecnic, where he also earned a diploma in journalism. He obtained a Master’s degree from Haceteppe University in Turkey and, in 1995, was a social development Research Associate at Harvard University.
An ethnobiologist who researches food harvesting in Costa Rica. For the past decade her research program has focused on access to food in Costa Rican national parks. Specifically her emphasis has been on Indigenous rights to access and harvest cultural food. Olivia is a member of the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the International Society of Ethnobiology, the Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage Project, and the POLIS Project on Ecological Governance. Being active within these networks allows her to work at the interface of policy and practice regarding food harvesting and access.

Instructor, Liason, Media, Peace and Conflict Studies Specialization and Editor, Peace and Conflict Monitor and Peace and Conflict Review Ross Ryan holds degrees in political science and literature from McMaster University, Canada and the M.A. degree in environmental security from the University for Peace, Costa Rica. He is chief editor of the Peace and Conflict Monitor and managing editor of the Peace and Conflict Review, as well as instructor in the department of peace studies and liaison officer of the media, peace and conflict studies specialization. He is currently working on a research project entitled “Information Technology, Civic Engagement, and the Cyber-Ethnography of Peace Movements”.

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