Academic Course Calendar

Courses and Teachers
June 2018
Course listings are continously updated with new information
Courses Teacher Credits # Weeks Dates
The Law of the Sea
Mandatory
Gudmundur Eiriksson
(Iceland)
2 credits
2 weeks
4-15 Jun 2018
8:45am - 11:45am At Classroom #2
Globalization and Human Rights
Mandatory
Mihir Kanade
(India)
3 credits
3 weeks
4-22 Jun 2018
1:15pm - 4:15pm At Classroom #2
Identity Politics, Inclusion and Peace Building
Mandatory
Heather Kertyzia
(Canada)
Saumava Mitra
(India)
3 credits
3 weeks (NOTE: including four double sessions - days TBA - 8:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.)
4-18 Jun 2018
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #5
Transnational Organized Crime
Mandatory
Philip Reichel
(United States)
3 credits
3 weeks
4-22 Jun 2018
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #1
Reporting and Representing Distant Suffering
Mandatory
Heather Kertyzia
(Canada)
Saumava Mitra
(India)
3 credits
3 weeks (NOTE: including four double sessions - days TBA - 8:45 a.m.-4:15 p.m.)
4-18 Jun 2018
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #5
Education for Sustainability
Mandatory
Mirian Vilela
(Brazil)
3 credits
3 weeks
4-22 Jun 2018
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Classroom #3
Seminario Taller: Temas de la Agenda Internacional II (3 créditos)
Mandatory
Mariateresa Garrido Villareal
(Venezuela)
Sharon López
(Costa Rica)
3 credits
3 weeks
4-22 Jun 2018
8:45am - 11:45am. At Classroom #4
Leading in Times of Change: Innovating from the inside out
Recommended
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
3 credits
3 weeks
4-22 Jun 2018
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Council Room
Sustainable Development and Environment Diplomacy (1 credit)
Mandatory
Narinder Kakar
(India)
1 credits
1 week: Monday 18 June: Morning Session, Tuesday 19 June and Wednesday 20 June: Double session AM-PM.
18-20 Jun 2018
8:45am. - 4:15pm. At Classroom #2



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COURSE DESCRIPTION

The law of the sea is a discipline within the field of public international law which regulates the activities of States and persons at sea. Its rules are to a large extent laid down in the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. The Convention, which has properly been called the “Constitution for the Oceans”, can be regarded as one of the major accomplishments of the United Nations, in that it deals in a comprehensive manner with all aspects of the uses of the seas which cover over 70% of the world’s surface. The course traces the provisions of the Convention and thus provides an overview of the prevailing legal regime.

The 21st century is described as the age of globalization, a phenomenon which is increasingly affecting human beings in every aspect of their lives. While globalization has undoubtedly resulted in significant economic and social integration at the global level, the pace at which it is occurring has also brought with it several unintended consequences for the respect and promotion of human rights at other levels. The principal institutions facilitating this phenomenon such as the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and the World Trade Organization, have often been accused of keeping human rights issues out of their respective domains. Business Corporations also have been accused of undermining human rights, and at times even being complicit in gross violations. An important feature of globalization is its nexus with development policies in our contemporary world, including the newly adopted Sustainable Development Goals, development aid, regulation of infectious diseases, movement of people etc., often with regressive effects.
The critical challenge facing the present world order, therefore, lies in ensuring that the vehicles of globalization are oriented towards development and promotion of human rights, through appropriate laws and policies. This course will introduce students to the major themes and debates concerning these different linkages between globalization and human rights and explore the new streams of critique that have enabled a confluence as well as a questioning of the globalization-human rights interface.

This course will the complexity of genders, ethnicities races, sexual orientations, religions and their intersectionlity in contemporary peace keeping and peace building work. The course aims to deal with practical and theoretical aspects of identity and its effect on peace building and keeping in the field of conflict transformation and prevention. While notions of Hegemonic masculinies and feminities are questioning what constitute gender vs sex. The course will explore contemporary concepts that attempt to bridge conflicting identities and politicize the process of identity fluidity and development.

The course seeks to provide  a comprehensive and critical understanding of the expanding global problem of transnational organized crime which is undermining peace and human security, fuelling internal and international conflicts or violence, accentuating human rights violations and impacting negatively on the political, economic, social and cultural development of societies worldwide. Students will draw on conceptual/ theoretical and policy analyses, research findings and case studies from diverse regions and countries to examine various forms of transnational organized crime including the illicit arms trade, money laundering, illicit drug trafficking , theft of art and cultural objects, theft of intellectual property, piracy, cyber crime, trafficking in persons, trade in human body parts, environmental crime, intellectual property theft, organized fraud, infiltration of legal business, and graft and corruption.  The course will highlight the negative impact of transnational organized crime on state institutions and good governance (e.g., political, health, social, legal, justice, commercial and financial systems) and on  legal and social norms. Students will also examine recent initiatives by governments and international organizations, in particular the United Nations, to address and overcome such transnational organized criminality, such as notably the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its related protocols on Trafficking in Persons, Smuggling of Migrants and Trafficking of Firearms.

This course will focus on how conflicts and crises are conveyed in and through various media and by various actors and trace the concomitant role such ‘coverages’ i.e. representations and mediations, of human suffering has in creating conditions of global humanitarian and humane responses. Based on the body of research on portrayals of ‘distant suffering’ through audio-visual, visual and text-based media while drawing upon theoretical works of Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, Edward Said, Judith Butler, Barbie Zelizer, Lille Chouliaraki and Stuart Allan among others, this course will bring socio-semiotic understanding of media’s ‘messages’ into critical contact with how media depicts war and conflict for global audiences.

The course will also broaden the understanding of media to include not only news and other commercial and mainstream media but also humanitarian communications by international community organizations, international NGOs and other donor or charity-funded organizations as well as digital representations of conflicts and crises produced by local citizens and activists. Students will not only learn how commercial media distorts representation of conflicts and crises, reifies stereotypes and biases and creates ‘worthy’ and ‘unworthy’ victims but also how such representations are also present in humanitarian and activist communications. Furthermore, the students will engage with counter-flows to such biases and stereotypes in media representation which are emerging[1] in an increasingly complex global media system dependent on digital technology and globalized, de-centralized production systems.

This course introduces and explores the critically important notion of sustainability and the implications that the sustainable development agenda has for education, learning and social change. Sustainability embraces ecological mindfulness, competence, equity, social justice (intragenerational and  inter-generational), peaceful relationships and action for transformation. The aim of the course is to develop a sound understanding and appreciation of the scope and complexity of sustainability issues and their significance; an understanding of the role of education, and of the kinds of learning and education needed to help realize a safer and more liveable future at local, national and international scales; and to encourage a personal engaged response to these issues.  Key themes include: the concept of sustainable development (SD); responses to sustainability at personal, organisational, and community level including barriers and drivers; the role of worldviews and perception in relation to addressing sustainability issues; ecological perspectives and Gaian thinking; systems thinking and sustainability intelligence; exploring futures scenarios; re-thinking education for our times; transformative learning and sustainability pedagogy; sustainability literacy; the role of the Earth Charter; the transition movement, resilience, design and strategy for change.

This course, which is the concluding one in the Masters program, aims to help participants take the next step in their personal and professional journey. It focuses on a human paradigm of leadership – the ability to reflect on self, think about people you collaborate with, and reflect on frameworks for engaging people around a common goal. Using cutting-edge concepts in positive psychology, human centered design, and appreciative inquiry, the course will give participants the space, structure, support and motivation to answer some fundamental questions regarding strengths, limiting beliefs, and key priorities. The course is structured to be leaner-centered, and will involve a variety of teaching approaches, including brief presentations, case studies, guest speakers, a variety of group exercises, TED-style videos and simulations. Overall, the overarching objective of the course is to provide an opportunity for participants to step back from the day-to-day and reflect upon important questions about life goals and how to take action on them. 

The purpose of this course, in the first instance, is to develop understanding of the concept of sustainable development and its evolution over the past decades and the importance of mainstreaming it into national development plans and strategies. It will then explain how discussions are conducted in various UN for a between countries and groups of countries to develop  agendas and programmes like the Agenda 21; various environmental conventions; Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda, as also related thematic/sectoral issues.



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FACULTY

Gudmundur Eiriksson is Professor and Executive Director, Centre for International Legal Studies, Jindal Global Law School. He holds an A.B. degree and a B.S. degree (Civil Engineering) from Rutgers College, an LL.B. (Honours) degree from King’s College London and an LL.M. degree from Columbia University. He is a Fellow of King’s College London. Professor Eiriksson served from 1974 to 1976 as a Law of the Sea Officer in the Office of the Secretary-General of the United Nations for the Law of the Sea. He served from 1977 to 2014 in the Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Iceland, as Assistant Legal Adviser, Legal Adviser and Ambassador of Iceland in Ottawa, Pretoria and New Delhi. He was a member of the United Nations International Law Commission from 1987 to 1996 and a Judge at the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea from 1996 to 2002. He is a Judge ad hoc in the M/V “Norstar” Case before the Tribunal. He is a member of the Panel of Conciliators and Panel of Arbitrators, International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes, the Panels of Conciliation and Arbitration under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, the International Council of Environmental Law and the IUCN World Commission on Environmental Law. He is a member of the Icelandic Society of Professional Engineers. He is a life member of the Indian Society of International Law and a member of the Asian Society of International Law, the International Law Association and the American Society of International Law. He is a Member of the Editorial Board of the Inter-American & European Human Rights Journal/ Revista Interamericana & Europea de Derechos Humanos and the Advisory Board of the Nordic Journal of International Law. Professor Eiriksson is the author of The International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea and numerous articles on the law of the sea, legal education, international criminal law, international organizations, international relations, disarmament and human rights.

Resident Professor and Academic Coordinator of Peace Education Programme
Heather Kertyzia is currently Resident Professor and Academic Coordinator of Peace Education Master Programme at the University for Peace. She is also an assistant professor of Negotiation, Conflict Resolution and Peacebuilding at California State University Dominguez Hills. She focuses on peace education, working with teachers in participatory action research to create more peaceful secondary schools. As a former secondary school teacher, Heather understands the importance of the local community in building more socially, economically and environmentally just educational spaces. As an interdisciplinary student and scholar, she has worked with communities throughout the Americas, with a recent focus on partnering with local grassroots organizations in Nicaragua.

Mariateresa Garrido is Teaching Assistant and a Doctoral Student at UPEACE. She holds two Master's Degrees one from UPEACE in International Law and the Settlement of the Disputes and one from the Central University of Venezuela in International Law. Prior to her Master's Degree she had been working in promoting and defending human rights in Venezuela with different organizations such as Transparency International and Espacio Publico. Her principal research area is related to freedom of expression and safety of journalists.

Dr. Mihir Kanade (India) is the Academic Coordinator of UPEACE, the Head of its Department of International Law, and the Director of the UPEACE Human Rights Centre. He holds an LL.B. from Nagpur University (India) and a Master degree and Doctorate from UPEACE. He is also an adjunct faculty at Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio (Spain), Cheikh Anta Diop University (Senegal), and Long Island University (United States). His principal area of academic research and study is International Law, Human Rights and Globalization, covering several themes within that interface including trade and investment, sustainable development, forced migration, indigenous peoples’ rights, public health, amongst others. He has extensive experience in training staff of inter-governmental, governmental and non-governmental organizations, as well as professionals, in the field of human rights. He acts as an advisor to several human rights organizations and corporations on issues related to international law and human rights. He serves on the International Advisory Board of the International Bar Association on the topic of Business and Human Rights. He also leads a project of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights on promoting the Right to Development. Prior to his pursuit in academia, Mihir practiced for several years as a lawyer at the Bombay High Court and at the Supreme Court of India.

Executive Director, Earth Charter International Secretariat and the Earth Charter Center on Education for Sustainable Development
Mirian is the coordinator of the UNESCO Chair on Education for Sustainable Development with the Earth Charter. She holds a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, where she was an Edward Mason Fellow and a B.Sc. with focus on International Trade. She is currently working on a Doctorate on Education focusing her research on education for sustainability. She has worked with the Earth Charter International Initiative since the beginning of 1996, therefore for more than 20 years; she has facilitated consultation processes and workshops, and coordinated local, regional and international projects. She has been a Professor in the Master's Programs of the University for Peace since 2004 in the areas of Sustainable Development, Environmental Governance, and Education for Sustainable Development. Mirian participated actively in major United Nations Conferences on Sustainable Development such as: Earth Summit (1992), Rio+5 (1997), Rio+10 in Johannesburg (2002), and Rio+20 (2012), articulating consultations and dialogues with various groups and sectors, as well as collaborating and influencing these processes.

Director of the UPEACE Centre for Executive and Professional Education and a faculty member at UPEACE. Prior to this position, he served as Education Programme Manager of the Earth Charter Initiative, an international nonprofit organization. Before his 4-years in the non-profit sector, he worked both in the private sector and also as a high school teacher in Ecuador. He has a Bachelor's degree from Stanford University and his Master's from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Mr. Kakar was most recently the Director of the University’s United Nations Liaison Office in New York, where he served concurrently as the Permanent Observer of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN). Prior to joining UPEACE, Mr. Kakar spent 30 years with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), holding diverse posts with progressively increasing responsibility in Yemen, Guyana, Turkey and China. He most recently served as the Country Coordinator in the Maldives. Among his other UNDP posts, he was Deputy Director and subsequently Director of the Division for Resource Mobilization in New York. During his long career with the United Nations, Mr. Kakar served on a number of bodies, including the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund from 1989 to 1995. He also chaired the Joint Appeals Board during the 1990s and was the first member of the United Nations Federal Credit Union Board of Directors, chairing it from 1991 to 1995. A citizen of India, Mr. Kakar received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Delhi Polytecnic, where he also earned a diploma in journalism. He obtained a Master’s degree from Haceteppe University in Turkey and, in 1995, was a social development Research Associate at Harvard University.

Philip Reichel is Emeritus Professor in both Criminal Justice and Sociology at the University of Northern Colorado and Adjunct Professor at the University of New Hampshire Law School. He also serves as the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences’ NGO Alternate Representative to the United Nations. During his more than 40 years in academia, he has received awards for teaching, advising, service, and scholarship. Especially notable among those were his selection as his university’s Distinguished Scholar in 2003 and his selection in 2005 by the student council as Advisor of the Year. Professor Reichel is the author of Comparative Criminal Justice Systems: A Topical Approach, coeditor of the Handbook of Transnational Crime and Justice, coauthor of Corrections, and coeditor of Human Trafficking: Exploring the International Nature, Concerns, and Complexities. In addition, he has authored or co-authored more than thirty articles and book chapters. He has provided guest lectures at universities in Austria, Germany, and Poland, participated in a panel for the United Nations University, presented papers at side-events during the United Nations Congress on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (Brazil) and the United Nations Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice (Vienna), and was an invited speaker at Zhejiang Police College in Hangzhou, China. He remains active in his retirement by providing service to professional organizations, continuing to update his existing textbooks, and taking on new writing projects.

Saumava Mitra did his PhD from University of Western Ontario, Canada. His doctoral research was on the working conditions and image production of Afghan photojournalists who cater to global audiences. His abiding interest is in understanding the nuances of representations conflicts and crises and he has explored this topic from various angles in his previous research publications. He was recipient of an Erasmus Mundus scholarship from the European Union during his Master’s program in Journalism which he pursued in Denmark, Netherlands and the UK. Before his research career, he worked in international journalism and international development in India, Netherlands, Tanzania and Kenya.

Coordinadora Maestria en Derechos Humanos y Educación para la Paz Docente e investigadora de la Universidad Nacional
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