Academic Course Calendar

Courses and Teachers
From February 2018 To February 2018
FROM TO
Course listings are continously updated with new information
Courses Teacher Credits # Weeks Dates
Rethinking of Peace in the Anthropocene
Recommended
Hans Günter Brauch
(German)
1 credits
1 weeks
5-9 Feb 2018
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Other
Regional Mechanisms for Human Rights Protection (3 credits)
Mandatory
Frans Jacobus Viljoen
(South Africa)
Jorge Francisco Calderón Gamboa
(Mexico)
Julie Diane Recinos
(USA)
María Pía Carazo Ortiz
(Costa Rica)
3 credits
3 weeks
7-27 Feb 2018
1:15pm - 4:15pm At Classroom #3
International and Transnational Adjudication
Mandatory
Miriam Estrada-Castillo
(Ecuador)
3 credits
3 weeks
7-27 Feb 2018
8:45am - 11:45am At Classroom #3
Tools for Conflict Resolution and Transformation
Mandatory
Balázs Kovács
(Hungary)
3 credits
3 weeks
7-27 Feb 2018
8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. At Council Room
Seminario Taller: Temas de la Agenda Internacional (3 créditos)
Mandatory
Kevin R. Casas-Zamora
(Costa Rica)
Marcia Aguiluz
(Costa Rica)
Raúl Benitez-Manaut
(México)
3 credits
3 weeks
7-27 Feb 2018
1:15pm - 4:15pm At Classroom #4
Natural Resource Management Field Course
Mandatory
Jan Breitling
(Germany)
3 credits
3 weeks
12-27 Feb 2018
1:15 PM - 4:15 PM At Council Room
Social Entrepreneurship
Mandatory
Alonso Muñoz
(Costa Rica)
3 credits
3 weeks
12-27 Feb 2018
8:45 AM - 11:45 AM At Classroom #4
Hybrid Diploma in Social Innovation
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
18 months
22-24 Feb 2018
Positive Leadership
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
3 days
22-24 Feb 2018
Personal Branding: Telling your story
Optional
Mohit Mukherjee
(India)
0 credits
1 day
25-25 Feb 2018



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COURSE DESCRIPTION

The world is changing. Some argue that there are signs showing that the world order established after World War II will cease to be and be replaced by a new one. Many recent developments point towards an erosion of democratic and human rights values. Is there a risk that the human rights protection systems become diluted and irrelevant? Human rights bodies perform their duties in the context of today’s political developments. How are they faring? Are they doing a good job? Are they efficient in promoting and protecting human rights?

The main objective of this course is to provide students with a theoretical and practical understanding of international and regional human rights systems. The course aims to familiarize the students with the governing norms, institutions and procedures of universal and regional mechanisms for human rights protection and promotion. This shall be done in a comparative manner. Current challenges and difficulties of the regional and international systems, as well as their advantages and disadvantages, will also be addressed.

The course starts with a general introduction to the international human rights protection mechanisms. This will be followed by an introduction and overview of the European, Inter-American and African human rights systems. We will also focus on issues such as gross violations, vulnerable groups, rights of minorities, and economic, social and cultural rights, among others.

This course offers a general overview of the international legal system of courts and tribunals. It will provide students with a thorough understanding of the role as well as the limitations and potential of international adjudicatory bodies in international law and international relations. The course will look at the historical and political context in which international adjudication was first developed and later expanded. It will analyze the specific position and place that international adjudicatory bodies hold in the global governance system. In this quest for understanding we will consecutively deal with the International Court of Justice as the prime example of a ‘world court’ and with some of its most salient features and characteristics. Close attention will be given to rules of jurisdiction and competence, as well as procedure. We will then turn to regional courts and how these are playing and have played a role in the establishment of solid regional political identities. After this we will look at courts that are meant to protect the dignity and fundamental rights of individuals and we will consider the characteristics of human rights courts as well as international criminal courts. A recent trend has been the parallel development of international claims tribunals and arbitration mechanisms for investment disputes. Likewise, dispute settlement mechanisms in international financial institutions, as well as in the context of free trade agreements, have taken flight and are reshaping the global picture of adjudication and formal dispute settlement mechanisms. Finally, we will consider the role of domestic courts and the transnational dimension of domestic litigation.

Designed as an advanced workshop, this course provides a conceptual, theoretical and analytical understanding of, as well as practical skills in conflict analysis, negotiation, resolution and transformation essential in peacebuilding within and between states. Drawing on examples of complex conflicts involving nation-states, non-state groups, communities and citizens, students will examine various frameworks and tools for analyzing those conflicts, including the drivers, processes of escalation and conditions for de-escalation. The course will also provide basic knowledge, tools and skills in the vital strategy of negotiation in managing and resolving conflicts. It focuses on how the process of conducting diplomatic negotiations and other informal processes aimed at managing inter-state and intra-state conflicts have an impact on the outcomes of those conflicts, laying the foundations for outcomes ranging from stable peace to further escalation of violence. The workshop will also introduce students to various types and strategies of mediation as an important means of alternative conflict or dispute resolution. In the concluding sessions, students will examine the differences between conflict resolution and conflict transformation which focuses especially on addressing the root causes of conflicts, transforming and building long-term relationships with grassroots and community empowerment and fostering reconciliation.

This class is an opportunity to explore in-depth how different land-uses and conservation approaches intermingle in one particular region: the South of Costa Rica.  The purpose of the field trip is to obtain critical direct experience and knowledge of important natural resources management issues in a developing country, given the real political, economic and ecological context of the same. This course enables students to assess the contextual factors that affect natural resource management. Over the course of the trip, we will visit and be exposed to projects and issues with various resources, different actors involved in the management and different institutional settings.

The worlds of ‘working for the betterment of society’ and ‘private enterprise’ are often seen as incompatible. This course will attempt to breakdown that perception in order for participants to see the social sector as a place of opportunity, both to ‘do good’ but also to innovate and build a financially sustainable social enterprise, whether non-profit, for-profit, or some combination of the two. The course suggests that in order to get a socially beneficial idea off the ground, effectively grow it, and make it financially sustainable, social entrepreneurs need to think creatively beyond models of traditional non profits or for-profits. 

This hands-on and dynamic course will expose participants to a number of cases of social entrepreneurs who have converted their desire of building a better world into a reality. The course will include a field-based case where participants will experience first hand a social enterprise in Costa Rica. The course hopes to inspire participants with an entrepreneurial spirit, help gain an understanding of the challenges of the start-up process, and think about the complexities of growing and managing it.

The Hybrid Diploma in Social Innovation is awarded upon completing 5 of the UPEACE Centre’s courses within a period of 18 months, including one onsite professional development workshop.  You will begin the program in Costa Rica from February 22-24, 2018 for the Positive Leadership seminar. Also required is the online course ‘Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Social Change.’ 

In addition to these courses, you may choose 3 more from the following options:

  • Skills for Effective Negotiations
  • Designing Your Life: Innovating From the Inside Out
  • Educating in Changing Times: Reflect, Rethink, Rebuild
  • Mission Impossible: Measuring Outcomes & Impact
  • Social Media for Social Innovation
  • Regenerative Leadership

These courses are offered several times during the year, so make sure to check our list of courses and their upcoming dates.  In order to enroll in these courses, just send us your choice of courses, so we can reserve your space. 

Please note that travel expenses to and in Costa Rica for the Positive Leadership workshop are not included in the Hybrid Diploma cost of $2,395.

This course will cover the following themes:

  • Integral Leadership
  • Appreciative Inquiry
  • Self-Evaluation and energy audit
  • Conflict Style and Resolution
  • Practicing Innovative Thinking
  • Getting Things Done

By the end of this course, you will have cultivated:

  • A deeper understanding of your why and Purpose
  • A clear empowering story – for personal branding and change making
  • A written personal statement that can serve as your bio, summary on LinkedIn, or anyplace else where a concise, inspiring personal blurb is helpful
  • Inspiration and a new confidence in your personal story and storytelling skills
  • A new network of local and international colleagues interested in making positive impact
  • A certificate from the UN-mandated University for Peace to include on your resume and professional profile


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FACULTY

Alonso Muñoz is Instructor in the Department of Environment and Development at the University for Peace, where he coordinates the Master of Arts (MA) degree in Responsible Management and Sustainable Economic Development (RMSED). He holds a BSc. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Costa Rica and a Msc. in Business Administration. He has worked in the private sector as a consultant and as an entrepreneur, and has volunteered on various national and international projects regarding peace education, migration, environmental impact of systems and Social Enterprises. He is a novelist, a blogger, a peace advocate, an entrepreneur and passionate about social and environmental development.

Balázs Áron Kovács currently serves as the programme manager of forumZFD, a German NGO working in the field of conflict transformation. He is in charge of forumZFD’s programme in the Philippines. Earlier he taught international relations at Webster University Thailand and peace and conflict studies at the United Nations-mandated University for Peace in Costa Rica and the Philippines. Balazs received his PhD degree in 2017 from the University of New England, Australia, in peace studies/politics and international studies. His research focuses on local-level peace-building, state theory, and state-society interactions of the violent kind.

Frans Viljoen obtained the degrees LLB, MA (in Afrikaans literature) and LLD (on the African regional human rights system) from the University of Pretoria (UP); and the degree LLM from Cambridge University.  In October 2007, he was appointed as Director of the Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria. He is also the academic co-ordinator of the LLM (Human Rights and Democratisation in Africa), presented by the Centre, in collaboration with seven partner law faculties across Africa. He is also the author of numerous articles, especially dealing with human rights issues, and International human rights law in Africa. He is editor-in-chief of the African Human Rights Law Journal and co-editor of the English and French versions of the African Human Rights Law Reports

He is editor of the Hexagon Book Series on Human and Environmental Security and Peace (HESP), of the Springer Briefs in Environment, Security, Development and Peace (ESDP), of the SpringerBriefs on Pioneers in Science and Practice (PSP); of Pioneers in Arts, Humanities, Science, Engineering, Practice (PAH-SEH) and of The Anthropocene: Politik—Economics—Society—Science (APESS) with Springer International Publishing (Cham – Heidelberg). He has been visiting professor of international relations at the universities of Frankfurt am Main, Leipzig, Greifswald, and Erfurt; re-search associate at Heidelberg and Stuttgart universities, and research fellow at Har¬vard and Stanford Universities
Jan Breitling is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environment and Development at University for Peace. He holds a BSc. in Tropical Forestry, from the Technological Institute of Costa Rica, and a MSc. in Environmental Sciences from WUR Wageningen University and Research Center, The Netherlands. His research interests include root causes of deforestation and Global Environmental Change, and Environmental Governance, specifically market based approaches addressing biodiversity conservation and Climate Change.
He is currently a Senior Legal Officer at the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, where he has worked since 2007. He obtained his law degree (JD equivalent) at the Universidad Iberoamericana (UIA), Mexico City, and an LL.M. degree in International Legal Studies at American University-Washington College of Law in 2007. He has also undertaken specialized studies in international criminal law at Leiden University. In Mexico, Jorge was active in different NGOs and worked on several community projects with indigenous peoples. He also worked as a Deputy Visitor at the Human Rights Commission of Mexico City (Ombudsman). He was a Research Assistant at the Academy on Human Rights and Humanitarian Law and an intern at Human Rights First in Washington, D.C, and Seconded Jurist at the ECHR in France. He has been a Professor on Human Rights at the University of Costa Rica (UCR) and in other international Masters programs in the Americas, as well as lectured in different countries in the Americas, Europe, and Africa. He is author of several articles on international human rights.
Julie Diane Recinos is a senior coordinating attorney at the InterAmerican Court of Human Rights, where she has worked since 2008. She holds a BA in history and political science magna cum laude from the University of Florida and a JD cum laude from the University of Notre Dame, both in the US. She has also undertaken advanced studies in human rights at the University of Oxford, UK, and has written and taught on international human rights instruments and standards in various academic and governmental institutions around the world. She specializes in gender rights.
El Doctor Casas Zamora es Investigador Asociado del Programa Peter D. Bell sobre Estado de Derecho en América Latina en el Diálogo Interamericano, en Washington D.C. Anteriormente fue Secretario de Asuntos Políticos en la Organización de los Estados Americanos, Investigador Asociado en el Programa de Política Internacional de Brookings Institution, y Segundo Vicepresidente y Ministro de Planificación Nacional y Política Económica de Costa Rica. Es Licenciado en Derecho por la Universidad de Costa Rica, Máster en Gobierno de América Latina por la Universidad de Essex y Doctor en Ciencias Políticas por la Universidad de Oxford. Es autor de numerosas publicaciones sobre gobernabilidad democrática, financiamiento político, seguridad ciudadana y relaciones cívico-militares en América Latina. Su tesis doctoral, titulada, “Pagando por la Democracia en América Latina: Financiamiento Político y Subsidios Estatales a los Partidos en Costa Rica y Uruguay”, ganó el Premio Jean Blondel 2004 del European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR) a la mejor tesis doctoral en Ciencias Políticas en Europa y fue publicada en el año 2005 por el ECPR. Sus publicaciones recientes incluyen: Kevin Casas Zamora & Miguel Carter, “Beyond the Scandals: The Changing Context of Corruption in Latin America” (Washington, D.C., Inter-American Dialogue, Rule of Law Report, 2017); Kevin Casas Zamora & Daniel Zovatto, The Cost of Democracy: Essays on Political Finance in Latin America (Washington, D.C., International IDEA – OAS – Inter-American Dialogue, 2016); Kevin Casas Zamora, ed., Dangerous Liaisons: Organized Crime and Political Finance in Latin America and beyond (Brookings Institution Press, 2013); Kevin Casas Zamora, The Besieged Polis: Citizen Insecurity and Democracy in Latin America (Brookings Institution - OAS, 2013). En 2007 fue seleccionado por el Foro Económico Mundial como Jóven Líder Global. Desde el 2013 es miembro del Bretton Woods Committee.
María Pía Carazo Ortiz (Costa Rica) has a Law degree from the University of Costa Rica (1996) and an LL.M. degree from the University of Heidelberg, Germany (1999). She is currently completing her Ph.D., also at the University of Heidelberg. Her areas of research include fundamental issues of Public International Law, Refugee Law, International Criminal Law, Transitional Justice, Human Rights (with an emphasis on regional protection systems) and Comparative Legal Studies (specially of Latin America, Spain, Portugal and Germany). Among her previous work experience she worked as a junior research fellow at Max-Planck Institute for Comparative Public Law and International Law in Heidelberg, Germany. She has also lectured and taught at different institutions, including the University of Bonn, Germany.
Dr. Miriam Estrada-Castillo (Ecuador) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of International Law. Prior to joining UPEACE, Dr. Estrada-Castillo worked as the Senior legal and political officer in the United Nations Security Council Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED). Prior to that position, she has worked with the UN system in various capacities, including as the International Prosecutor General, UN Peacekeeping Mission for East-Timor (DPKO), Expert and Vice-Chairperson of the Monitoring Committee of the UN Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), Chief of Field of the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, and the Latin America Regional Adviser on Gender, Human Rights and Culture of Peace for UNESCO. She has also worked as the President of the Ecuadorian Supreme Court of Juvenile Justice and as the Minister of Social Affairs in Ecuador. In her academic life, she worked recently as the Director of Master Degree Courses on Gender and the Law and Children in Armed Conflict, Lund University, Sweden. She is a Visiting Professor of the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law (RWI) and has also taught courses as a Visiting Professor at the Australian National University. She is the author of the Ecuadorian Law on Violence against Women and of the first Legislation for Minors and Family in the country.

Director of the UPEACE Centre for Executive and Professional Education and a faculty member at UPEACE. Prior to this position, he served as Education Programme Manager of the Earth Charter Initiative, an international nonprofit organization. Before his 4-years in the non-profit sector, he worked both in the private sector and also as a high school teacher in Ecuador. He has a Bachelor's degree from Stanford University and his Master's from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Es Investigador del Centro de Investigaciones sobre América del Norte de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM. También es Presidente de la Organización no gubernamental “Colectivo de Análisis de la Seguridad con Democracia. A.C.”. Tiene estudios de Sociología en la UNAM, de maestría en Economía y Política Internacional en el CIDE y de doctorado en Estudios Latinoamericanos en la UNAM. Ha sido profesor de la Universidad de Columbia en Nueva York (2001), de la Universidad Americana de Washington (2006-2007), Del Centro de Estudios Hemisféricos de la Defensa de la Universidad Nacional de la Defensa de Estados Unidos (2004). Fue investigador visitante del Woodrow Wilson Center de la ciudad de Washington en 1998 y 2003. Es colaborador de la Universidad Para La Paz. En 1992 impartió el Seminario "Seguridad, Desarme, Desarrollo y Paz", en el Programa de Maestría en Relaciones Internacionales. 1 al 12 de junio de 1992.
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